Profile

Cover photo
Arthur Gillard
Lives in Sacramento, CA
966 followers|515,903 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
As gaming continues to evolve, it is fascinating to see games emerging from various cultures around the world. 

<quote> Game development is on the rise in Africa. Just for example, the first-ever West African Gaming Expo was hosted in Lagos last fall, and an eagerly-anticipated roleplaying game made in Cameroon will launch later this year.

Polygon's Colin Campbell goes inside Kiro'o Games' Aurion, Legacy of the Kori-Odan, whose developers hope to express their heritage through a game with traditional RPG style and influences:

Wikipedia names 84 games that are set in Africa, including around 20 that are based on animals, hunting or wildlife, with a smattering of driving and touring titles. Most others feature visiting Westerners involved in combat. The heroic white man in the exotic jungles of Africa is an entertainment tradition that goes back to Tarzan, but in the special case of video games, most fictional visitors to that continent come heavily armed and in uniform. Kiro'o is creating a martial fantasy of its own, one that draws upon local traditions.

"There is not in fact one 'African mythology,'" says Meli. "We are really diverse. In Cameroon alone we have over 250 ethnic groups. But in Aurion you will find architectural inspiration inspired from West Cameroon tribes. Clothing of an African inspiration, but without making it too exotic. The lance of the main character, Urithi, was designed with the ambition to mix a lance and a Zulu shield..." </quote>
Game development is on the rise in Africa. Just for example, the first-ever West African Gaming Expo was hosted in Lagos last fall, and an eagerly-anticipated roleplaying game made in Cameroon will...
1
Add a comment...

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Congratulations to Anita Sarkeesian, one of Time's "100 most influential people." Profiled below by +Wil Wheaton. Keep up the good work! :)

#gaming  
3
Add a comment...
 
"I run like a girl, just try to keep up." Spotted while walking home. I approve.   #SightsOfSacramento  

BONUS: I love that my reflection is visible in this picture. I didn't mean for it to be a selfie...
4
Add a comment...

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Cosy sleeping fox. Found somewhere on teh intertubes a while ago...lost the source. 
6
1
Arthur Gillard's profile photoLaura Gibbs's profile photo
2 comments
 
I support this. :)
Add a comment...

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Two interesting articles on potential negative effects of children playing games that are beyond their maturity level, and what would be an appropriate response to that.

1) Headteachers [in England] threaten to report parents who let their children play 18-rated games: A necessary step, or a step too far?

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2015-03-30-headteachers-threaten-to-report-parents-who-let-their-children-play-18-rated-games

Gives useful background; basically teachers sent out a letter to parents threatening to report them to child protection services if they discover a child under 18 is playing games rated 18+. Most people, myself included, seem to think this is going way too far and is unhelpful at best.

2) "He suddenly became incredibly sullen, angry and frustrated. He was 10": Teachers versus parents who let their kids play adult games: the other side of the story

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2015-04-02-he-suddenly-became-incredibly-sullen-angry-and-frustrated-he-was-10?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=socialoomph [also linked below]

A rebuttal to the outcry to the first article by a teacher in England who is also an avid gamer. 

If this interests you, I strongly recommend reading both articles in full. The second article is more in-depth and probably covers everything you need to know. It seems quite nuanced to me.
1
Add a comment...

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Sounds interesting! 

<quote> Can science fiction be a form of social activism? Walidah Imarisha thinks so, and she's recruited everyone from LeVar Burton to Mumia Abu-Jamal to help her prove it.

"Whenever we try to envision a world without war, without violence, without prisons, without capitalism, we are engaging in an exercise of speculative fiction," writes Imarisha in Octavia's Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements, an anthology of short sci-fi stories co-edited by her and Adrienne Maree Brown. "Organizers and activists dedicate their lives to creating and envisioning another world, or many other worlds, so what better venue for organizers to explore their work than through writing science fiction stories?"

Although the anthology features established names and writers like LeVar Burton, Tananarive Due and Mumia Abu-Jamal—who shares an essay about Star Wars and imperialism—the editors reached out to lesser known social activists and organizers as well, including some who had little to no experience with fiction and science fiction.

Some were initially hesitant to participate, but Imarisha says that simply creating the space for them had a powerful impact, and that most responded within a few weeks with "incredible ideas and some with dozens of pages already written... The writers in this collection just need a little space, and perhaps permission."

The editors were also particularly interested in including the voices of people from marginalized backgrounds in Octavia's Brood. "For those of us from communities with historic collective trauma, we must understand that each of us is already science fiction walking around on two legs. Our ancestors dreamed us up and then bent reality to create us."

The anthology's title is a reference to the celebrated black science-fiction writer Octavia Butler, whose work often explored issues of inequality and identity. As with many anthologies, some of the stories in Octavia's Brood are hit or miss, but most are quick, short-story trips to distant or disturbingly familiar worlds that offer insight into our own.

Highlights include "Revolution Shuffle" by Bao Phi, a story about a work internment camp for people of color set during a zombie apocalypse, and "The Long Memory" by Morrigan Phillips, about a society rejecting the wisdom of the intergenerational memory-keepers who act as their historians—and their conscience.

Imarisha calls the progressive strain of sci-fi in Octavia's Brood "visionary fiction," defined by its insistence on imagining freer and more liberated worlds or critiquing injustice, rather than uncritically recreating the power structures of the world as we know it in fantastical garb... </quote> 
<p>Whenever we envision a world without war, without prisons, without capitalism, we are producing speculative fiction. Organizers and activists envision, and try to create, such worlds all the time. Walidah Imarisha and adrienne maree brown have brought twenty of them together in the first anthology of short stories to explore the connections between radical speculative fiction and movements for social change. The visionary tales of <em>Octavia&...
2
Laura Gibbs's profile photoArthur Gillard's profile photo
2 comments
 
You're welcome! :)
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
966 people
truBrain's profile photo
Omily Smith's profile photo
Scott Blevins's profile photo
Marck Gomez's profile photo
Sam Almaguer's profile photo
Nancy Hayes's profile photo
Mark Rosst's profile photo
Dr. Kemi Gerfen's profile photo
Eduardo Gamboa's profile photo
 
This is very sweet. The Internet has a lot of great people on it. 
Vlogbrother/The Fault In Our Stars author John Green is one of my favorite people on the Internet (along with his brother Hank, of course).
1
Add a comment...

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
This really needs to happen, asap! I have nothing against Big Pharma coming up with nifty new drugs--but we need to have ALL the data on them. 

<quote> The World Health Organization called on Tuesday for the release of clinical trial results for all drugs, vaccines and medical devices - whatever the result - in the latest salvo against the withholding of data.

Marie-Paule Kieny, assistant director general at the United Nations health agency, said failure to disclose trial results led to misinformation and could result in skewed priorities for research and public health interventions.

"It creates indirect costs for public and private entities, including patients themselves, who pay for sub-optimal or harmful treatments," she said.

In recent years, the pharmaceuticals industry has gone a long way to commit to disclosing results for new clinical studies, but critics argue it is still not doing enough to ensure doctors have access to all drug data.

The WHO also wants disclosure of older unreported clinical trials, the results of which may still have an important bearing on medical practice and scientific research today.

Ben Goldacre, a British doctor and author who has led a campaign urging full disclosure, said the WHO statement was "powerful and welcome" but required practical implementation, for example through routine audits to identify completed but unreported trials. </quote> 
2
Add a comment...
 
Blackbird murals in an alley in Sacramento. #SightsOfSacramento  
2
Add a comment...

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Long article about accusations that esports players may use cognitive performance-enhancing drugs such as Adderall. +William Harryman, I know you've covered the issue of doping in more traditional sports, so this may be of particular interest to you.
Hours before Steven* was due to compete in his second professional eSports tournament, another team-member offered him a pill. "I had taken Adderall for a w…
1
William Harryman's profile photo
 
Adderall and Provigil are the ones I have heard about most. A couple of other drugs used for narcolepsy are also popular with competitive gamers and surgeons.
 
Add a comment...

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
Very interesting perspective, highly recommended. 

<quote> Sherlock Holmes gets to be brilliant, solitary, abrasive, Bohemian, whimsical, brave, sad, manipulative, neurotic, vain, untidy, fastidious, artistic, courteous, rude, a polymath genius. Female characters get to be Strong. </quote> 
Sherlock Holmes gets to be brilliant, solitary, abrasive, Bohemian, whimsical, brave, sad, manipulative, neurotic, vain, untidy, fastidious, artistic, courteous, rude, a polymath genius. Female characters get to be Strong.
1
1
Jim Tipping's profile photoJon Gorrono's profile photo
 
The writer makes some interesting distinctions. Nevertheless, action movie characters are seldom very deep. I don't go to those movies looking for realism; I bloody well won't get it. Honestly, I've pretty much stopped going to action movies at all.

TV does offer a few female central characters with depth and complexity. Consider Carrie in Homeland, or Elisabeth Moss's cop in Top of the Lake. Or her role in Mad Men, for that matter; we've watched Peggy become a different person, as interesting as Don Draper.
Add a comment...

Arthur Gillard

Shared publicly  - 
 
I enjoyed this article on the nature of play, and how you can find enjoyment in a game by not doing what you're "supposed to." 

#gaming  
My favourite thing in Dying Light isn’t the freerunning, or the day/night cycle, or the customisable weapons that I nevertheless do enjoy crafting in
10
1
Maksymilian Misiurski's profile photo
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
966 people
truBrain's profile photo
Omily Smith's profile photo
Scott Blevins's profile photo
Marck Gomez's profile photo
Sam Almaguer's profile photo
Nancy Hayes's profile photo
Mark Rosst's profile photo
Dr. Kemi Gerfen's profile photo
Eduardo Gamboa's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Book editor
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
"More like a cat than a washing machine."
Bragging rights
Effing the ineffable since 1967.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Sacramento, CA
Previously
vancouver, B.C. - Halifax, N.S. - Glace Bay, N.S. - Terrace, B.C. - pocket universe - alternate timeline
Links