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As If
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Interactive Worlds & Immersive Obsessions
Interactive Worlds & Immersive Obsessions

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As If Productions is a design and development studio specializing in custom websites, online services, games, live online events and interactive systems. Tod Foley is a freelance writer, editor, programmer and game designer, creator and publisher of "UbiquiCity", "DayTrippers", "Other Borders", "Watch the World Die" and author of Iron Crown's "CyberSpace" RPG.

As If Productions Website
http://asifproductions.com

Games
http://www.drivethrurpg.com/browse/pub/6911/As-If-Productions
http://www.rpgnow.com/browse/pub/6911/As-If-Productions

Writing and Editing
http://asifproductions.com/freelance-writer-editor

Small Business Websites
http://asifproductions.com/axis-cms

Big Business Websites
http://asifproductions.com/webdevportfolio

Tip Jar
https://paypal.me/AsIfProductions

Over at Patreon, I've divided my projects into separate accounts, allowing Patrons to choose those they're most interested in. The following projects are in need of your support:

AsIf - the central AIP Patreon account, aka the skunkworks.
https://www.patreon.com/asif

DayTrippers - expansions, supplements and adventure modules for the surreal science fiction reality-hopping roleplaying game.
https://www.patreon.com/daytrippers

Fictioneers - a directory of small-press RPGs and Storygames.
https://www.patreon.com/fictioneers

Fractopia - a podcast on near-future speculative fiction.
https://www.patreon.com/fractopia

StoryGameSpace - a modern PBP system for enhanced literary play.
https://www.patreon.com/storygamespace

UbiquiCity - a collaborative near-future sourcebook and anthology.
https://www.patreon.com/ubiquicity

3StringGuitar - just what it sounds like.
https://www.patreon.com/3stringguitar

Check 'em out. Every bit helps, and there's always lots of work to do. Your support will help make all these things better, stronger, and faster!
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The flickering needle jumps into red. New York crawls out of its bed. And the lamb lies down on Broadway.
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This just blew me away.
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Some people have difficulty discerning the ground covered by the "Fractopian" sub-genre; even offering quips to the effect of "oh, so, cyberpunk." But let's be pragmatic here: if the term "cyberpunk" covered the ground I was interested in, I wouldn't have needed to use another term. For starters, it might be easiest to illustrate what Fractopian Fiction is by pointing out what it isn't: It isn't cyberpunk, it isn't solarpunk; it isn't utopian and it isn't dystopian; all of those things are too categorical, too "all of a piece" to encompass the diversity and subtlety of the Fractopian worldview.

One way to put it might be: Fractopian Fiction is a "MetaModern" approach to covering ground which is viewed more homogeneously through those other genres. Its concerns and values are more philosophical and emotional than those of ideological allegory or "high-concept" adventure.

It is an attempt to write realistic speculative fiction in a world much like our own, but that just happens to take place in our future. Fractopian Fiction is at times ironic, at times sincere, and always focused more on the human condition than on technology or action for its own sake.

A look at films like "Her" or "Advantageous" will shed some light here: although both visions explore advanced digital technology and societal change, neither film presents a world you could rightly call "cyberpunk" (they're too light), nor "solarpunk" (they're too dark). From the Fractopian position one could easily see either a utopia or a dystopia just around the corner, and yet that corner hasn't been turned. In short, the Fractopian world is fragmented, diverse, multi-layered and troubled, just like the real world today. Politically, it admits both Capitalist Realism and socialized solutions to many of today's cultural issues, and like our own world, it teeters on a knife-edge between the two.
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Now up on YouTube...
Fractopia #4: Capitalist Realism
A discussion with writer and interactive media consultant Michael Utvich, examining the future of labor, employment, identity, and Capitalist Realism in the age of advanced automation.
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Because science fiction plays such a key role in shaping public opinion, he would like to see more science fiction that grapples with realistic issues like AI creating a permanent ‘useless class’ of workers. “If you want to raise public awareness of such issues, a good science fiction movie could be worth not one, but a hundred articles in Science or Nature, or even a hundred articles in the New York Times,” he says.

But he thinks that too much science fiction tends to focus on scenarios that are fanciful or outlandish.

“In most science fiction books and movies about artificial intelligence, the main plot revolves around the moment when the computer or the robot gains consciousness and starts having feelings,” he says. “And I think that this diverts the attention of the public from the really important and realistic problems, to things that are unlikely to happen anytime soon.”
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Just published a new short short by +Jens D. on ThisIsFractopia.com ... CitySys Health Irreg Report 23/567: A Day in the Field with Jeremy describes a day in the life of a Health Inspector in UbiquiCity.
#UbiquiCity #Fractopia #FoodPrinting
http://thisisfractopia.com/fiction/health-report
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New Thom Yorke
From Suspiria (Music for the Luca Guadagnino Film) - available October 26th
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"It is part of the philosophic dullness of our time that there are millions of rational monsters walking about on their hind legs, observing the world through pairs of flexible little lenses, periodically supplying themselves with energy by pushing organic substances through holes in their faces, who see nothing fabulous whatever about themselves."
- Martin Gardner; "The Annotated Alice"
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