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Hunter Lovins
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Attended Pitzer College
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Hunter Lovins

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Ah this could be exciting: researchers at Tulane have cultured a bacteria to convert the cellulose in paper directly into butanol - quite a nice fuel. Check it out: http://tulane.edu/news/releases/pr_082511.cfm
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While this is a new discovery it's really not surprising. We have known since early 2007 that the lowly termite is capable of cranking out two liters of hydrogen gas by digesting just one sheet of paper. Here is the link to the DOE info:
http://www.jgi.doe.gov/education/bioenergy/bioenergy_4.html

The bottom line? You give me a biomass and I'll give you a biofuel.
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Hunter Lovins

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Stephen Keaveny originally shared:
 
This issue of Scientific American looks interesting.

William Gibson - "The Internet, which I think of as a sort of meta-city, has made it possible for people who don't live in cities to master areas of expertise that previously required residence in a city" also mentions new planned cities like http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masdar_City and there are plenty others like this in China - China's planned megacity: Pop. 42 million - The Week http://look.ie/oYF1PS although Well-Planned New Cities in China Becoming Ghost Towns | MedIndia http://look.ie/pn7JHg
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the "China's planned megacity" story turned out to be inaccurate (http://www.france24.com/en/20110129-china-denies-plan-create-worlds-biggest-city), but the plans for the circum-Bohai megalopolis in the North (http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/01/bohai-economic-rim.html) are even more Gibsonian.

260 millions living along a high speed maglev line? what's Mandarin for "the Sprawl?"
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Hunter Lovins

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Emily Campbell originally shared:
 
Consider this - the Colorado River is over-allocated by 4 million acre feet in an average year, and the twelve-year drought that has plagued the region since October 2009 is still going strong. Climate change and top-soil degradation (which adds to air pollution and melts snowpacks) threaten future supply. BUT the public still thinks that the west has enough water to support even more thirsty fossil fuel development in order to bail us out of our energy crisis. Oil Shale, Tar Sands, Uranium, Fracking, and even industrial solar projects require billions of gallons of water. A 500 mega-watt coal power plant uses 2.2 billion gallons of water annually! And we really think THIS is the solution?
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It is an unbelievably scary scenario, no matter how you slice it. Thanks for spreading this message, because I agree, the effects will be more dramatic than anyone knows how to deal with. I mean to even contemplate the societal effects of true competition for water where access has barely been a thought is simply terrifying.

Yet, the pro-oil shale discussions continue to pervade and each lob-sided commercial on TV or radio spread such glowing messages it is painfully hard to watch and listen knowing what a decision to pursue them as a major energy source could entail. Another great example of turning a blind eye to the long term picture.

Sadly, it seems like the message you and the article spread is faint comparatively, how can we begin to bring it main stage? Or is it already to a degree? I think the solar community really needs to keep this in mind and embrace the "dry" model as some have developed, or else this could be an incredibly powerful blow against the industry and by extension renewables as a whole.

Thanks for the post and the work you do, it's my hope for me to be able to contribute as much one day soon too!
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Nuclear will cost Japan more than other options. Take home quote from Robert Feldman, chief economist at Morgan Stanley: "The current strategy to rely on nuclear to replace fossil fuels is a non-starter. Nuclear power is much more expensive than people believed given decommissioning costs, long-term uranium costs and (waste disposal) costs," http://t.co/yeq6Jk9
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Have her in circles
1,518 people
Udruga Kalcedon's profile photo
Jay Guru's profile photo
Casey Dilloway's profile photo
Kevin Bracy Knight's profile photo
Kevin Burke's profile photo
Chong Kee Tan's profile photo
Emily Campbell's profile photo
Work
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  • Madrone Project
    Chief Insurgent, present
  • Natural Capitalism Solutions
    President, 2002 - present
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A Colorado cowgirl, Hunter has been a leader of the sustainability movement since before the word existed. Named Sustainability Pioneer by the European financial community, Millennium Time Magazine Hero for the Planet and Newsweek's Green Business Icon, she is President of Natural Capitalism Solutions, and professor of sustainable management at Bainbridge Graduate Institute. She is the Chie Insurgent of the Madrone Project
Education
  • Pitzer College
    Sociology, Political Studies, 1968 - 1972
  • Loyola Marymount University
    law - JD, 1972 - 1975