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Francisco Hilario (BaseballSisco)
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On This Day in Baseball History February 25, 1934: Legendary New York Giants manager and the man known as the “Little Napoleon of the baseball diamond,” John J. McGraw (April 7, 1873 - February 25, 1934) dies from an internal hemorrhage due to uremia at New Rochelle Hospital. McGraw was 61-years old.

Here are a few of his achievements as a manager:
- 33 years as a MLB manager of which 31 seasons with the Giants
- 2,763 regular season wins (Second behind Connie Mack)
- .586 winning percentage for third best (with 2,000+ games managed)
- Three World Series Championships (1905, 1921 and 1922) and 10 National League Pennants
- Hall of Fame Inductee in 1937

#JohnMcGraw #LittleNapoleonoftheBaseballDiamond #MugsyMcGraw #NewYorkGiants #OnThisDayinBaseballHistory #ThisDayinBaseballHistory #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco

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On This Day in Baseball History February 25, 1934: Legendary New York Giants manager and the man known as the “Little Napoleon of the baseball diamond,” John J. McGraw (April 7, 1873 - February 25, 1934) dies from an internal hemorrhage due to uremia at New Rochelle Hospital. McGraw was 61-years old.

Here are a few of his achievements as a manager:
- 33 years as a MLB manager of which 31 seasons with the Giants
- 2,763 regular season wins (Second behind Connie Mack)
- .586 winning percentage for third best (with 2,000+ games managed)
- Three World Series Championships (1905, 1921 and 1922) and 10 National League Pennants
- Hall of Fame Inductee in 1937

#JohnMcGraw #LittleNapoleonoftheBaseballDiamond #MugsyMcGraw #NewYorkGiants #OnThisDayinBaseballHistory #ThisDayinBaseballHistory #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco

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On This Day in Baseball History February 24, 1966: After selecting University of Southern California standout pitcher Tom Seaver in the January 1966 draft, the Atlanta Braves signed Seaver to a $40,000 contract to start his professional career with the Richmond Braves.

Ok folks, this isn’t a “What if” scenario. We all know that Seaver came up with the New York Mets and won the 1967 National League Rookie of the Year. But the Braves did indeed draft and sign Seaver. So what happened? Read on.

Then MLB Commissioner William Eckert deemed that the Braves’ contract with Seaver was void since it violated the rules in place for the signing of amateur players. To make matters worse, since the college season was underway Seaver’s signing with a professional team made him ineligible to play college ball. This messy situation was resolved in the following manner.

Commissioner Eckert ruled that there would be a special lottery for Seaver which would include any team (except the Braves) who would be willing to match the offer made to Seaver by the Braves. The Cleveland Indians, the New York Mets and the Philadelphia Phillies all through their names into the mix and the winning team of the lottery were the Mets. We all know how Seaver and the Mets turned out.

But just imagine how different things could have been with lets say Seaver pitching in Atlanta alongside future fellow Hall of Famer Phil Niekro or in Philadelphia alongside Steve Carlton. Or how would have the Miracle Mets would have looked without Seaver. Would there even been a Miracle Mets team of 1969? We’ll never know the answer to those questions.

#TomSeaver #TomTerrific #AtlantaBraves #NewYorkMets #PhiladelphiaPhillies #ClevelandIndians #UniversityofSouthernCalifornia #USC #OnThisDayinBaseballHistory #ThisDayinBaseballHistory #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco

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On This Day in Baseball History February 24, 1966: After selecting University of Southern California standout pitcher Tom Seaver in the January 1966 draft, the Atlanta Braves signed Seaver to a $40,000 contract to start his professional career with the Richmond Braves.

Ok folks, this isn’t a “What if” scenario. We all know that Seaver came up with the New York Mets and won the 1967 National League Rookie of the Year. But the Braves did indeed draft and sign Seaver. So what happened? Read on.

Then MLB Commissioner William Eckert deemed that the Braves’ contract with Seaver was void since it violated the rules in place for the signing of amateur players. To make matters worse, since the college season was underway Seaver’s signing with a professional team made him ineligible to play college ball. This messy situation was resolved in the following manner.

Commissioner Eckert ruled that there would be a special lottery for Seaver which would include any team (except the Braves) who would be willing to match the offer made to Seaver by the Braves. The Cleveland Indians, the New York Mets and the Philadelphia Phillies all through their names into the mix and the winning team of the lottery were the Mets. We all know how Seaver and the Mets turned out.

But just imagine how different things could have been with lets say Seaver pitching in Atlanta alongside future fellow Hall of Famer Phil Niekro or in Philadelphia alongside Steve Carlton. Or how would have the Miracle Mets would have looked without Seaver. Would there even been a Miracle Mets team of 1969? We’ll never know the answer to those questions.

#TomSeaver #TomTerrific #AtlantaBraves #NewYorkMets #PhiladelphiaPhillies #ClevelandIndians #UniversityofSouthernCalifornia #USC #OnThisDayinBaseballHistory #ThisDayinBaseballHistory #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco

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On This Day in Baseball History February 19, 1946: It is announced that New York Giants outfielder Danny Gardella jumped from the Major Leagues to the new Mexican League, becoming the first player to do so.

According to the book Mexican Raiders in the Major Leagues: the Pasquel Brothers vs. Organized Baseball, 1946 by G. Richard McKelvey:

"On February 19, it was announced that Danny Gardella, a second year outfielder with the New York Giants in 1945 and a player of modest ability, had signed a contract to play for the Vera Cruz Blues. It was reported that Pasquel had offered Gardella $8,000 with a $5,000 signing bonus, which was twice the salary he was making with the Giants."

The five Pasquel Brothers signed a total of 23 MLB players who jumped ship to play for the Mexican League, leading to MLB Commissioner Happy Chandler to ban those players.

Gardella, who was one of the banned players, sued MLB and the New York Giants in United States District Court in New York on the basis that professional baseball was unlawfully him of his livelihood through the reserve clause (a player was owned by the first team that signed them until they were traded or released.) Gardella’s lawyers claimed that in doing so, professional baseball was violating federal anti-trust laws.

While the case was dismissed in 1948 based on the a 1922 Supreme Court ruling that established that baseball was not business that engaged in interstate commerce within the meaning of federal antitrust law. But in February 1949 a federal appeals court ruled against the decision and ordered the case to be re-tried. To avoid further litigation, MLB Commissioner Chandler rescinded all the bans and offered amnesty to the players who had gone to Mexico. Gardella would briefly sign with the Cardinals for the 1950 season.

Gardella’s case against professional baseball would be one of the earliest cases in which a player challenged baseball’s reserve clause in court.

#DannyGardella #MexicanLeague #PasquelBrothers #ReserveClause #LaborHistory #BaseballLaborHistory #OnThisDayinBaseballHistory #ThisDayinBaseballHistory #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco

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On This Day in Baseball History February 19, 1946: It is announced that New York Giants outfielder Danny Gardella jumped from the Major Leagues to the new Mexican League, becoming the first player to do so.

According to the book Mexican Raiders in the Major Leagues: the Pasquel Brothers vs. Organized Baseball, 1946 by G. Richard McKelvey:

"On February 19, it was announced that Danny Gardella, a second year outfielder with the New York Giants in 1945 and a player of modest ability, had signed a contract to play for the Vera Cruz Blues. It was reported that Pasquel had offered Gardella $8,000 with a $5,000 signing bonus, which was twice the salary he was making with the Giants."

The five Pasquel Brothers signed a total of 23 MLB players who jumped ship to play for the Mexican League, leading to MLB Commissioner Happy Chandler to ban those players.

Gardella, who was one of the banned players, sued MLB and the New York Giants in United States District Court in New York on the basis that professional baseball was unlawfully him of his livelihood through the reserve clause (a player was owned by the first team that signed them until they were traded or released.) Gardella’s lawyers claimed that in doing so, professional baseball was violating federal anti-trust laws.

While the case was dismissed in 1948 based on the a 1922 Supreme Court ruling that established that baseball was not business that engaged in interstate commerce within the meaning of federal antitrust law. But in February 1949 a federal appeals court ruled against the decision and ordered the case to be re-tried. To avoid further litigation, MLB Commissioner Chandler rescinded all the bans and offered amnesty to the players who had gone to Mexico. Gardella would briefly sign with the Cardinals for the 1950 season.

Gardella’s case against professional baseball would be one of the earliest cases in which a player challenged baseball’s reserve clause in court.

#DannyGardella #MexicanLeague #PasquelBrothers #ReserveClause #LaborHistory #BaseballLaborHistory #OnThisDayinBaseballHistory #ThisDayinBaseballHistory #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco

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I came across this news blurb from the February 12, 1915 New York Times. I makes you wonder how different the Baseball landscape would be today if there was a Federal League franchise in the Bronx.

Would the Yankees have still moved to the Bronx in 1923? Or would the American League have the Yankees or another team move to the Bronx as a preemptive move to try and block the Federal League from moving further into the NYC area.

It really is interesting to think about how today’s MLB would look with three leagues instead of two and with teams potentially still playing in Buffalo and Indianapolis.

The other Federal League teams played in current MLB cities of Baltimore, Chicago, Kansas City, Pittsburgh and St. Louis with another team in Brooklyn.
Any thoughts?

#FederalLeague #MLB #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco
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I came across this news blurb from the February 12, 1915 New York Times. I makes you wonder how different the Baseball landscape would be today if there was a Federal League franchise in the Bronx.

Would the Yankees have still moved to the Bronx in 1923? Or would the American League have the Yankees or another team move to the Bronx as a preemptive move to try and block the Federal League from moving further into the NYC area.

It really is interesting to think about how today’s MLB would look with three leagues instead of two and with teams potentially still playing in Buffalo and Indianapolis.

The other Federal League teams played in current MLB cities of Baltimore, Chicago, Kansas City, Pittsburgh and St. Louis with another team in Brooklyn.
Any thoughts?

#FederalLeague #MLB #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco
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On This Day in Baseball History January 29, 1901: At a meeting in Philadelphia, Byron Bancroft “Ban” Johnson, Charles Comiskey, Connie Mack and John McGraw announce that a new major league will commence play for the 1901 season. The former minor league known as the Western League will be rechristened the American League. The league would play its inaugural season in the following cities: Chicago, Boston, Detroit, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Cleveland and Milwaukee.

In 1902, Milwaukee would be replaced by St. Louis. In 1903 the Baltimore franchise would be relocated to New York City. The league would remain the same for 52-years until the St. Louis Browns moved to Baltimore becoming the Orioles for the 1954 season.

#AmericanLeague #ByronBancroftJohnson #BanJohnson #CharlesComiskey #ConnieMack #JohnMcGraw #WesternLeague #OnThisDayinBaseballHistory #ThisDayinBaseballHistory #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco

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On This Day in Baseball History January 29, 1901: At a meeting in Philadelphia, Byron Bancroft “Ban” Johnson, Charles Comiskey, Connie Mack and John McGraw announce that a new major league will commence play for the 1901 season. The former minor league known as the Western League will be rechristened the American League. The league would play its inaugural season in the following cities: Chicago, Boston, Detroit, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Cleveland and Milwaukee.

In 1902, Milwaukee would be replaced by St. Louis. In 1903 the Baltimore franchise would be relocated to New York City. The league would remain the same for 52-years until the St. Louis Browns moved to Baltimore becoming the Orioles for the 1954 season.

#AmericanLeague #ByronBancroftJohnson #BanJohnson #CharlesComiskey #ConnieMack #JohnMcGraw #WesternLeague #OnThisDayinBaseballHistory #ThisDayinBaseballHistory #BaseballHistory #HistoriaDelBeisbol #Baseball #Beisbol #BaseballSisco
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