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Michael Pattinson
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Clinical Hypnotherapist & Ego States Psychotherapist
Clinical Hypnotherapist & Ego States Psychotherapist

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What is Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Irritable bowel syndrome or IBS for short affects between 14 and 25% of the general population (Jones and Lydeard, 1992). The major symptoms of the the condition are abdominal pain, altered and frequent bowel movements – all of which impair quality of life most often to a high degree. Interestingly the causes of IBS are not well understood but it is thought that a combination of stress, anxiety, and past trauma often play a role in its development (Rutter and Rutter, 2002). It has been found medication has limited efficacy in its treatment but study after study indicates hypnosis and hypnotherapy more often than not is a very effective treatment for IBS.



http://www.hypnotherapymelbourne.net/hypnosis-ibs-melbourne/
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By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), physical inactivity is the fourth-leading risk factor for global mortality, causing an estimated 3.2 million deaths around the world annually. Readers of this blog need no convincing that it’s important to be active every day. But is spending more time on it enough to reduce the risk of early death? Not necessarily. How we perceive this activity turns out to be just as important. We learn of this from the authors of an intriguing study in Health Psychology devoted to physical activity and mortality.


Octavia Zahrt and Alia Crum at Stanford University were inspired by an earlier experiment involving hotel room attendants who completed a 20-minute intervention informing them that their daily work satisfied exercise recommendations and highlighting the benefits of this active lifestyle. This intervention not only shifted room attendants’ perceptions, but also resulted in health improvements including lower blood pressure and reductions in weight and body fat.

Zahrt and Crum examined data from 61,141 Americans (selected to be representative of the general population) to determine whether the way we think about our own physical activity could be of major and long-term significance for health. The data came from the US National Health Interview Survey and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which included questions assessing how much exercise individuals think they get compared with their peers. The surveys also asked respondents detailed questions about actual physical activity they had undertaken, and in some cases participants wore an accelerometer to measure their activity objectively. The researchers cross-checked these survey data against the National Death Index records as they stood 21 years after the exercise surveys had been completed.

As the researchers expected, perceived physical activity relative to peers was closely associated with risk of dying. Even after adjusting for actual levels of physical activity, individuals who perceived themselves as less active than others were up to 71 per cent more likely to die in the follow-up period than those who perceived themselves as more active. One can say with confidence that individuals’ perceptions about their level of physical activity were strongly related to their longevity, even after accounting for the effects of actual physical activity and other known determinants of mortality such as smoking or obesity.

There are a few potential explanations. A convincing one is that perceptions can affect motivation. For instance, a room attendant’s awareness that she is getting exercise at work might increase her confidence and commitment to a healthy lifestyle, and motivate her to act on this “active” identity. Conversely, longitudinal research shows that individuals who perceive themselves as unfit compared with their friends are less likely to exercise a year later.

Another potential mechanism is that perceptions can have emotional consequences. Public health messages often warn of the “life-threatening consequences” of physical inactivity. A person’s perception that she/he is inactive might thus lead to fear and stress about not getting enough exercise, with harmful consequences for health.

Still another explanation is that our positive beliefs and expectations can directly induce physiological responses, even following inert treatments, as shown by the placebo effect (similarly, negative expectations can lead to a harmful “nocebo effect”). Following this logic, participants in the current research who failed to realise that they were getting good exercise may not have experienced its full physiological benefits. Conversely, negative expectations related to the belief that one is not getting enough exercise could have become self-fulfilling because of nocebo-like effects.

Today we are not able to give a conclusive answer to the question of which of these mechanisms is most important. Perhaps a constellation of them? Or maybe there is another, unknown process involved.

Whatever the mechanisms at play, what do these results mean for mere mortals, and for those who are involved in promoting an active lifestyle? Instead of working out, should we stand in front of the mirror and repeat to ourselves “I’m an active and physically fit person”? To be clear, the authors warn that their findings don’t mean exercise is unimportant. Separate from the influence of our perceptions, physical activity continues to be a crucial determinant of health. However, a more thorough understanding of these results could help us optimise public health messages, finding the happy medium between highlighting that people need to exercise more, but not to the extent that they become downhearted about the exercise they do get.

Further studies will doubtlessly bring us more answers, but before that happens, let’s get up, walk away from the desk, and look at our activity with friendlier eyes than before.

—Perceived physical activity and mortality: Evidence from three nationally representative U.S. samples

Tomasz Witkowski - doktor psychologii. Pwsin 2006/10/20 fot.K.Zuczkowski

Post written by Dr Tomasz Witkowski for the BPS Research Digest. Tomasz is a psychologist and science writer who specialises in debunking pseudoscience in the field of psychology, psychotherapy and diagnosis. He has published over a dozen books, dozens of scientific papers and over 100 popular articles (some of them in Skeptical Inquirer). In 2016 his latest book Psychology Led Astray: Cargo Cult in Science and Therapy was published by BrownWalker Press. He blogs at https://forbiddenpsychology.wordpress.com/.
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“Change will lead to insight far more often than insight will lead to change.”
― Milton H. Erickson
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Remembrance Day.
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The practice of hypnotherapy in treating and managing claustrophobia is gaining ground. Hypnosis is now seen by some as an accepted form of intervention that is non-invasive and chemical-free
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Symptoms of Claustrophobia

The onset of panic may vary from one sufferer to another. A claustrophobic may feel a bolt of sudden fear when getting into an elevator or going inside a cellar. A common trigger for a sufferer arises when they need to go through an MRI machine. Being restrained or incarcerated can also bring about different manifestations of the disorder.

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If you are struggling to lose weight, there are four main ways hypnosis can help:

Hypnosis has the ability to help you increase your will power around food choices. It can reinforce your desire to eat healthy and to have a stronger decision making ability to block bad calorie choices like eating ice cream and chocolate.

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Suffering from fears?

Public speaking anxiety (Glossophobia) is the most common anxiety and phobia that people possess – statistics suggest that nearly 3 in 4 people suffer from this condition. Some research does seem to show that people who suffer from this type of phobia or anxiety have had a negative experience as a child in a public speaking environment.


http://www.hypnotherapymelbourne.net/public-speaking-melbourne/
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Facing what we feel is the most important step in making changes. Sensing them in the body

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