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Chris Lele
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2,021 followers
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Khan Academy recently released free SAT prep material in conjunction with the College Board, the creators of the test. 

Our thoughts might surprise you: http://bit.ly/1IyCp1V
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If you haven't been checking out the weekly Magoosh Brain Twisters (#Brain Twister), you are missing out (well, that's if you like the masochism that comes doing brutally difficult questions :)).

So far, nobody has yet to solve the question correctly. Will you be the first?

http://magoosh.com/gre/2014/magoosh-brain-twister-now-thats-quite-a-playlist/

 
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Here is our awesome new Vocabulary Builder App. Boost your vocabulary easily and effectively. I also found it highly addictive :)
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Oh, and I almost forgot! Here is particularly interesting Vocab Wednesday: Pirate words. Don't forget to watch the video too :)
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I just posted this month's GRE "Article of the Month". This one is actually a collection of responses to an intriguing question: Which idea from science should be retired? 
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Want to ace #SAT Reading? Learn the 350 most important #vocab words with our new (and FREE!) online flashcards: http://sat.magoosh.com/flashcards :) 
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Usually I focus on words that have surprising second definitions—definitions you would never be able to guess based on the original definition. Today, I’ve chosen words that have a second definition that is loosely related to the original definition.
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Check us out on Instagram! Lots of good vocab and #GRE  tips here. :) 
It's happened! Magoosh GRE is finally on Instagram. Follow us for cool memes, math jokes, vocabulary pics and more: http://instagram.com/magooshgre 
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At one point, actually only a mere two years ago, the GRE tested obscure vocabulary. The test was different back then (the revised GRE became the standard in Aug. 2011) and had two very vocab-heavy question types: Analogies and Antonyms.

Back then knowing the word was often enough to net students a point. As a result, students crammed thousands upon thousands of words. One recourse the GRE test writers had was to use increasingly obscure words, so a majority of students wouldn’t end up answering a difficult question correctly.  Thus, words like etiolate, foudroyant, and nimiety would show up in antonym questions—words so obscure that not even bombastic academicians use. Indeed, the word etiolate has only been used once in the 160-plus year history of The New York Times, and that entry was to underscore the rarity of the word.

All this may be interesting as a tidbit of test prep arcanum—though you’d be forgiven for thinking the question moot, now that the test has changed. But the question of obscure vocabulary is relevant for two reasons. Read on to find out these reasons! 
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I’m not sure why it took me so long, but I’ve finally spent some time on vocabulary.com. The site had been recommended by students a few times before, but I only gave the site a cursory glance, thinking it not much different—or superior—to wordnik.com.

Wordnik.com, which I’ve recommended to students thus far, not only gives you the definition of the words; it also gives you example sentences. Learning vocabulary for the revised GRE requires great example sentences, and Wordnik—more or less—provided these.

But, to tell the truth, I found myself gravitating more to nytimes.com to look up example sentences, because I knew the consistency of writing would be stellar. Wordnik.com, by contrast, was a little too ecumenical, picking example sentences from just about any online source. And of course there were those impenetrable definitions taken from stodgy old dictionaries, written, most likely, by troglodytic lexicographers.

After a mere one hour on vocabulary.com, I can say my apostasy is complete: I am now a fan of vocabulary.com and only see myself consulting wordnik.com for the range of definitions it provides for each word.

So why is vocabulary.com so much better? Read on to find out. 
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