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Tiago Stürmer Daitx
292 followers -
A (software (optimizer|developer)|linux sys admin|thinkerer|rpg entusiast|eternal geek|below average cyclist|winter kind of guy).
A (software (optimizer|developer)|linux sys admin|thinkerer|rpg entusiast|eternal geek|below average cyclist|winter kind of guy).

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It's not just cyclists, it's everybody - breaking the law in traffic - http://blog.koehntopp.info/index.php/1253-breaking-the-law-in-traffic/

The reasons seem to differ, but that apparently matter not much for the outcome.

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Using 128 KB buffers will probably give you the best performance when copying files on Linux (cp already does that) due to the kernel's readahead buffer size.

https://eklitzke.org/efficient-file-copying-on-linux

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From the Full ACK Dept: »Q: Why do TCP connections always die?
A: Death is one of the inevitable consequences of the original SYN«
-- https://twitter.com/danslimmon/status/763801826969792512
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Abstract:

Can bits of an RSA public key leak information about design and implementation choices such as the prime generation algorithm? We analysed over 60 million freshly generated key pairs from 22 open- and closedsource libraries and from 16 different smartcards, revealing significant leakage. The bias introduced by different choices is sufficiently large to classify a probable library or smartcard with high accuracy based only on the values of public keys. Such a classification can be used to decrease the anonymity set of users of anonymous mailers or operators of linked Tor hidden services, to quickly detect keys from the same vulnerable library or to verify a claim of use of secure hardware by a remote party. The classification of the key origins of more than 10 million RSA-based IPv4 TLS keys and 1.4 million PGP keys also provides an independent estimation of the libraries that are most commonly used to generate the keys found on the Internet.

Our broad inspection provides a sanity check and deep insight regarding which of the recommendations for RSA key pair generation are followed in practice, including closed-source libraries and smartcards.

https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity16/technical-sessions/presentation/svenda

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If you like classic video games and if you like to get really, really mad about copyright law and big corporations, this one is for you:

http://kotaku.com/the-sad-story-behind-a-dead-pc-game-that-cant-come-back-1688358811

The super fun and atmospheric homage to 60s secret agent movies, No One Lives Forever, was about to be re-released and modernized to run on current systems (including Linux, by the way). Unfortunately, it's not clear who owns which parts of the rights to the franchise. And the companies involved have no interest in finding out, basically saying: Maybe we got some IP here, maybe not. We don't know. We're also too indifferent to find out. But if you publish that shit and it turns out we do have rights, we'll sue your behinds.

So now the world needs to wait another... what is it now? 70 years? Or are we at 90 years already until this becomes public domain? Nevermind, I'm sure someone (cough**Disney**cough) will make sure to extend copyright limits before that ever happens.

Another piece of culture lost.

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»tfw ransomware has a more elegant and ethical sunsetting policy than every drm scheme and cloud service in existence«
-- https://twitter.com/tobypinder/status/733048990862823425
» tfw ransomware has a more elegant and ethical sunsetting policy than every drm scheme and cloud service in existence«
-- https://twitter.com/tobypinder/status/733048990862823425
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