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Alfonso Zambrano
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Netflix has recovered impressively from a nasty stumble in 2011, when it announced changes to its pricing structure so unpopular that they had to be abandoned. As customers quit, its share price plunged. This year it has been the best-performing share in the S&P 500. Investors are pleased that it is devoting some $150m of the $2 billion it spends each year to acquire content on original programming http://econ.st/180IfD1 
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In Mexico many are reluctant to admit that the country has become a middle-class nation. This is partly because so much of Mexico's historical narrative is about poverty. It is also because, for armchair socialists, the ways of defining the middle class includes access to things that are often considered abhorrently American http://econ.st/14xzM8I
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Increible.
High school students riot after teachers stop them from cheating on exams.

High school students taking university entrance exams in the small Chinese city of Zhongxiang went on a rampage after teachers actually tried for the first time to seriously crack down on cheating. 

The school brought in 54 teachers from other schools to administer the test and set up metal detectors to find electronic cheating devices. 

They also deployed officials to patrol the area outside the school to catch people using transmitters to beam answers to test takers. 

As soon as the test was over, a mob of students, parents and others started throwing rocks, with some chanting: "There is no fairness if you do not let us cheat." (The idea is that cheating is so widespread in China that one school not being allowed to cheat is unfair.) Teachers were trapped inside while police tried to protect the school. 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/10132391/Riot-after-Chinese-teachers-try-to-stop-pupils-cheating.html
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In 2012, Americans worked less and watched more TV, a new government survey found. http://on.wsj.com/13XQqPI

How do you spend your time?
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There are good arguments for and against aggressive public policy to stop obesity. Tomorrow at 12:30 ET / 17:30 UK time, Charlotte Howard, The Economist's Health care correspondent, and Thomas Farley, Health Commissioner of New York City, will discuss the government’s role in the health of its citizens via a live Hangout. To pose a question please comment below and for more details visit our event page http://bit.ly/13tjnBl
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Sales of George Orwell’s novel “1984” jumped over 4,900% on Amazon following reports of a classified program that lets the U.S. government collect personal data. | http://bloom.bg/14vgKBS

(Photo: CBS Photo Archive)
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Privacy is over...
The U.S. government has been collecting detailed info on the phone calls and Internet communications of millions of citizens for years. Is it legal? What do they do with the data?

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Pero en Venezuela los animales del gobierno dicen que el capitalismo está en crisis ... 
Household net worth increased to $70.3 trillion in the first quarter of 2013, exceeding its pre-recession peak for the first time. | http://bloom.bg/15Ekos3

(Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg)
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Dear Google users—

You may be aware of press reports alleging that Internet companies have joined a secret U.S. government program called PRISM to give the National Security Agency direct access to our servers. As Google’s CEO and Chief Legal Officer, we wanted you to have the facts.

First, we have not joined any program that would give the U.S. government—or any other government—direct access to our servers. Indeed, the U.S. government does not have direct access or a “back door” to the information stored in our data centers. We had not heard of a program called PRISM until yesterday.

Second, we provide user data to governments only in accordance with the law. Our legal team reviews each and every request, and frequently pushes back when requests are overly broad or don’t follow the correct process. Press reports that suggest that Google is providing open-ended access to our users’ data are false, period. Until this week’s reports, we had never heard of the broad type of order that Verizon received—an order that appears to have required them to hand over millions of users’ call records. We were very surprised to learn that such broad orders exist. Any suggestion that Google is disclosing information about our users’ Internet activity on such a scale is completely false. 

Finally, this episode confirms what we have long believed—there needs to be a more transparent approach. Google has worked hard, within the confines of the current laws, to be open about the data requests we receive. We post this information on our Transparency Report whenever possible. We were the first company to do this. And, of course, we understand that the U.S. and other governments need to take action to protect their citizens’ safety—including sometimes by using surveillance. But the level of secrecy around the current legal procedures undermines the freedoms we all cherish.

Posted by Larry Page, CEO and David Drummond, Chief Legal Officer
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