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Bruno L. Giordano
7,347 followers -
Interested in human processing of natural sounds, perception, neuroscience, photography
Interested in human processing of natural sounds, perception, neuroscience, photography

7,347 followers
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If you are in neuroscience, and ever wondered what information theory can do for you, and would like to have code to give it a try, you will definitely love this!

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"For conveying one's intellect, it is important that one's voice, quite literally, be heard"

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Unpublished preprints in the life sciences

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A nice experiment ran by the NIPS organizers on the reliability of the review process: "Half the papers appearing at NIPS would be rejected if the review process were rerun".... and this is likely not the only case.

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Nice study: "Exaggeration in news is strongly associated with exaggeration in press releases. Improving the accuracy of academic press releases could represent a key opportunity for reducing misleading health related news" #impact   Via +Dale Barr 

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A very nice study on the comparison of computational models of inferior temporal cortex during visual-object processing.

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Auditory pitch has an intrinsic spatial connotation: Sounds are high or low, melodies rise and fall, and pitch can ascend and descend. In a wide range of cognitive, perceptual, attentional, and linguistic functions, humans consistently display a positive, sometimes absolute, correspondence between sound frequency and perceived spatial elevation, whereby high frequency is mapped to high elevation. In this paper we show that pitch borrows its spatial connotation from the statistics of natural auditory scenes. This suggests that all such diverse phenomena, such as the convoluted shape of the outer ear, the universal use of spatial terms for describing pitch, or the reason why high notes are represented higher in musical notation, ultimately reflect adaptation to the statistics of natural auditory scenes.

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Language-related brain regions: similarities and differences) between monkeys and humans.
A new study compared (fMRI) ventrolateral frontal cortex, a key structure for language but also decision-making and cognitive flexibility, in humans and monkeys. The authors found surprising similarities in the connectivity. At the same time, however, they showed  key differences in the way that they interact with brain areas involved with hearing. The data might give hints on the evolutionary processes underpinning our ties to other primates but also drove to distinctions.

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And the answer, based on this review, appears to be no (obviously)

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A very informative review of studies on the processing of auditory objects in the brain!
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