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Marsha Bowers
Lives in California, United States
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Perched inside the sky fifty-two tales above Tokyo, a model new exhibition celebrates a 30-yr retrospective of Studio Ghibli, the Japanese animation studio
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Dog Mosaic at the Olearie Exhibit – Rome, Italy and Roman Dog Names
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What did the ancient Romans name their four-legged best friends? Lucius Iunius Moderatus Columella gives us a few recommended names in the section of his work on agriculture dealing with the rearing and training of dogs. Other likely sources used by the ancient Romans for dog names may have come from literature, in much the same way that people today draw on literature for naming their dogs.

Here is a list of some of the names in both Greek and Latin as mentioned by some writers. Each name is followed by gender and meaning.

Agre. f. “Hunter”. One of Actaeon’s hounds in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. …keen-scented…

Argiodus. m. “White-tooth”. One of Actaeon’s hounds in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. …from a Cretan father and a Spartan mother…

Celer. m. “Speedy”. A recommended dog name in Columella’s On Agriculture.

Ferox. m. “Savage”. A recommended dog name in Columella’s On Agriculture.

Harpyia. f. “Seizer”. One of Actaeon’s hounds in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. …with her two pups…
Dog Mosaic at the Olearie Exhibit – Rome, Italy and Roman Dog Names Quote from the original post. What did the ancient Romans name their four-legged best friends? Lucius Iunius Moderatus Columella gives us a few recommended names in the section of his work on agriculture dealing with the rearing ...
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white rose from my garden
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Corinthian black-figure hydria, Nereids lamenting the death of Achilles.
Greek, Corinthian, 560 – 550 BC
Nereids info from wiki
In Greek mythology, the Nereids are sea nymphs (female spirits of sea waters), the 50 daughters of Nereus and Doris, sister to Nerites. They often accompany Poseidon, the god of the sea, and can be friendly and helpful to sailors fighting perilous storms, as the Argonauts find the Golden Fleece.

Nereids are particularly associated with the Aegean Sea, where they dwelt with their father Nereus in the depths within a golden palace. The most notable of them are Thetis, wife of Peleus and mother of Achilles; Amphitrite, wife of Poseidon; and Galatea, lover of the Cyclops Polyphemus.

They symbolized everything that is beautiful and kind about sea. Their melodious voices sang as they danced around their father. They are represented as very beautiful girls, crowned with branches of red coral and dressed in white silk robes trimmed with gold, but who went barefoot. They were part of Poseidon’s entourage and carried his trident.
Corinthian black-figure hydria, Nereids lamenting the death of Achilles. Greek, Corinthian, 560 – 550 BC Nereids info from wiki. In Greek mythology, the Nereids are sea nymphs (female spirits of sea waters), the 50 daughters of Nereus and Doris, sister to Nerites. They often accompany Poseidon, ...
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L. Boualem (LB CASA I JARDI)'s profile photoMarsha Bowers's profile photo
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Thanks L! hugs back and you also have great weekend!

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Horus.............. King Tut's Treasures, Egyptian Museum #Cairo 💝
Peace & Love Be Upon #Egypt.......... Earth & You....... 
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3-D Simulations and NASA Supercomputer Help Further Discovery of the Origin of Stars This simulation captures a mix of radiation, magnetic fields, gravity and other physical phenomena. It was produced with UC Berkeley’s code and run on the Pleiades supercomputer at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing facility at NASA’s Ames Research Center. What processes are involved in the formation of individual stars and stellar clusters in our own galaxy and other galaxies? Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are using NASA’s most powerful supercomputer, Pleiades, to create unique star-formation simulations to answer this fundamental scientific question.
 
 
 
Like something from a video game, the simulations zoom through the entire evolution of young star clusters. A giant cloud of interstellar gas and dust collapses under the forces of gravity. Inside the cloud, turbulent clumps of gas form and then collapse. The collapsed clumps form star clusters, and then the magnetized, swirling cores further evolve to form individual or small groups of stars.
 
 
 
These complex simulations as seen here — which capture a mix of radiation, magnetic fields, gravity and other physical phenomena — were produced with UC Berkeley’s code and run on the Pleiades supercomputer, located at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley. Currently ranked as the seventh most powerful system in the U.S., the Pleiades supercomputer was critical for obtaining the high-resolution results that match closely with observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and other observing telescopes. Scientists demonstrated the accuracy of the code by performing many independent tests of different elements of physics modeled against real known data. 
 
 
 
The science team is enhancing the code to produce new simulations that will allow them to zoom in on the formation of stellar disks — pancake-shaped disks of gas and dust surrounding protostars that are believed to be the first stage of planet formation.
 
 
 
Reaching this goal will require even more computing power. The NAS facility is continuously growing its supercomputing capability to support even higher resolution star-formation simulations — plus hundreds of other NASA mission projects in aeronautics, Earth and space science and exploration of planets and the universe.
 
Author: Jill Dunbar, Ames Research Center
Image credit: NASA Ames/David Ellsworth/Tim Sandstrom, UC Berkeley/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/Richard Klein
Media contact: Kimberly Williams, Ames Research Center
 
#spaceexploration #nasa
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Mona Lisa of Galilee, art in mosaic, from the 3rd century city of Sepphoris, in what was Then Roman Palestine. She is part of a large mosaic - Whose main subject is Dionysus - Which decorates the floor in a grand villa.

Today, this place known for its Hebrew name Tzippori is a national park near an agricultural settlement. Archaeological excavations discovered a Roman theater, a stronghold of the Crusaders, the network of streets and the ruins of buildings. The most exciting discovery is an impressive amount of Roman and Byzantine mosaics. There is a reconstructed Roman villa whose floor is covered with colorful mosaics depicting scenes of Roman cults. One of the paintings depicts a woman who has been called "The Mona Lisa of the Galilee" (3rd century). There is the construction of the Nile mosaic from the Byzantine period remains with works by artists from the 5th century, with Egyptian and hunting scenes celebrate the high waters of the Nile.

Mosaic is possibly a word of Greek origin (of μουσαικόν, transl. Mousaikón, "work of the Muses"), although the technique is ancient. It is a built-in small pieces (tesserae) of stone or other materials such as plastic, sand, paper or shells, forming specific pattern. The aim of the design is to fill some sort of plan (generally, floor or wall).

It is a type of ancient decorative art, which brings us back to the Greco-Roman antiquity, when reached its apogee. In their preparation they were used various types of materials.

Source: Wikiart

#art   #history   #historical   #archeologia   #artwork   #historic   #ancient  
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Continued prayers for Nice and all the victims and their families <3
may you find the strength you need during this time.
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Bless them

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hehe happy weekend to all!
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Thanks Marsha I'll let him know,
hes doing well !

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My absolutesarts website portfolio
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tanx Rob! Have a great weekend!
Marsha's Collections
Story
Tagline
Fine Artist
Introduction
Artist specializing in Fine Art Paintings and Decorative art. My websites are-
Marsha Bowers Fine Art
and
Zulim Bowers Designs
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
California, United States
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Phone
1-559-298-9888
Work
Occupation
Fine Artist & Decorative Painter
Skills
fine art, trompe l'oeil, murals, gilding, painted furnishings
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Gender
Female