Profile

Cover photo
James Meadows
Works at Assemblies of God
Attended University of Phoenix
Lives in Kansas City, Missouri
45,750 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 10

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.  For the past two weeks, I have made one of Mumaw’s major points the subject of each day’s blog post and offered my analysis and reflection.  Today, I will wrap up this series.

Mumaw defines visual resonance as:

“The ability to evoke or suggest personal images, memories, and emotions.”

He identifies the salient characteristics that trigger visual resonance:

Emotional.

Experiential.

Entertaining.

Novel.

Authentic.

Story.

His concluding point is that brands are not people.  Therefore, the question becomes what is it about your brand or product that helps people?

I love this concluding thought.  It makes perfect sense to me.  The key contributors to visual resonance all roll up to the idea of helping people.  I see several reasons for this phenomenon.

People Still Care For Other People.  In spite of all the world’s problems and pain, most people genuinely care for other people.  That quality is intrinsic to our very being.  Therefore, any brand that touches on that element will immediately resonate with people.

People Remember The Heroes And The Zeros.  People may be very busy, but people tend never to forget.  This is especially true when it comes to the heroes and the zeros.  Do a mental inventory right now; you can remember the organizations and brands that you have stamped as heroes as well as the ones you have stamped as zeroes.  Moreover, you know exactly why in each case.

People Love To Affiliate With People Lovers.  Like attracts like.  Human nature draws people to other people and organizations that love people.  We find ways to spend time with them.  We all like to be affiliated with that which is noble, pure, and good.  This is why people love to affiliate with people lovers wherever they may be found.

So, the final question then is what is it about your brand or product that helps people?  The organization or creative that wants to connect with its audience must know how to answer that question convincingly.  When it does that, you have an explosively winning combination—it is simultaneously good for business and people.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 8

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.  Mumaw defines visual resonance as:

“The ability to evoke or suggest personal images, memories, and emotions.”

Mumaw emphasizes that the power of the picture’s composition captures our attention.  I agree heartily.  Certain images simply draw you into them because they instantly tell a story or imply matters that are off screen.  Our imagination takes over and perpetuates the work started by the photo’s initial presentation.  That ongoing imagination reserves space in our brains.  It connects us to the brand and the brand to us, and therein lies its power.

The organization or creative that wants to connect with its audience must always remember that the composition of the picture can write more than mere words on the recipient’s brain—even beyond its viewing.  And isn’t that exactly what you want your brand to do?

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 6

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.  Mumaw defines visual resonance as:

“The ability to evoke or suggest personal images, memories, and emotions.”

One of the contributors to visual resonance is novelty.  Mumaw emphasizes that difference is noticed.  Oreo did this effectively by sculpting various shapes and images out of their traditional cookies.

I believe that difference can be simple or complex.  It all depends on your preferences and your creativity.  What is important for the organization is that it is willing to try.  A great way to start is by asking two important questions:

What have we done in the past?
What can we do in the future that we have never done in the past or that we can do differently?

By analyzing the answers to the first question, you will lay the groundwork for creative answers to the second question.  You have to understand the inventory of your past to unleash the potential of your future.

The organization or creative that wants to connect with its audience must be willing to capitalize on novelty.  You never know how that might play into personal images, memories, and emotions.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 4

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.

Mumaw talked much about the experiential element; put people in a place.  A picture that displays action, atmosphere, movement, emotion, and striking content compels the viewer into that experience.  We’ve all been there and shall continue to be there.  The truth is as old as time.  We can talk all day long about the intellectual efficacy of your particular idea, but when a person experiences that idea, everything changes.

The organization or creative that wants to connect with its audience must continuously capitalize on the element of the experiential.  Ultimately, you cannot argue with someone’s experience.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 2

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.

Mumaw talked much about emotion because it is the common human element that comes from our hearts.  More specifically, his point was that people read emotions into images based on our experiences.  That is powerful because it means that a picture will instantly command attention as it resonates with something in that person’s history.  It calls up something from within, creating a tighter connection.  This underscores how and why pictures have such potential.

Even though you might read a somewhat different emotion into a picture than I do, and even though your personal history is different from mine, the point is that the picture captures us each.  Therein lies the power of the image.  It is powerful not because of the image intrinsically but because of what it evokes from each of us.

I greatly appreciated the excellent job Mumaw did reminding us of these powerful human dynamics and how they relate to what we do in social media.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
WRAPPING UP THE CODE ISSUE

In June, I read the entire special double issue of Bloomberg Businessweek on computer coding (Paul Ford, “The Code Issue”, 6/15/15–6/28/15).  As I posted in late June, I knew then that I had come across something that powerfully stands out, something that is extra special.  The entire issue is devoted to helping readers understand a little about how computers work and much more about what writing code involves.  It covers technical points, mathematics, the culture and quirks of coders, and how coding fits into the larger business world.  It is a very big topic to cover, yet Bloomberg Businessweek does so in a very informative, thorough, and sometimes humorous fashion.  I thoroughly enjoyed the lengthy read.

Today, after having devoted 32 blog posts to what I felt were the most interesting, timely, and exquisite quotes from the issue, and after having devoted one blog post to the excellent Bloomberg Businessweek reader feedback, I am now wrapping up this series.  I am choosing to conclude the series the same way it began.  The issue’s introduction so well foreshadows the significance of the content, that I believe concluding with it will reinforce its enduring value.  Whether you are a hardcore geek, a coder, a PC novice, someone who just never thinks about coding, or a technophobe, you will richly benefit from exploring the tome.  With that said, here is the splendid opening segment that enticingly leaves the reader hungering for more.  My encouragement to you is to go out and get that “more” (“Introduction” by Josh Tyrangiel, 6/15/15–6/28/15, p. 13):

“Software has been around since the 1940s.  Which means that people have been faking their way through meetings about software, and the code that builds it, for generations.  Now that software lives in our pockets, runs our cars and homes, and dominates our waking lives, ignorance is no longer acceptable.  The world belongs to people who code.  Those who don’t understand will be left behind.

. . . [This issue] may take a few hours to read, but that’s a small price to pay for adding decades to your career.”

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 9

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.  Mumaw defines visual resonance as:

“The ability to evoke or suggest personal images, memories, and emotions.”

Mumaw emphasizes the power of story in our images.  I absolutely agree with him.  Everyone loves a good story and we all have them—we’ve all lived them.  Therefore, images that evoke story will connect.  People will remember those images.  Because a picture is worth a thousand words (and then some), an organization’s brand is strengthened when those kinds of images are wisely used.

This is where the creative element becomes very important to your strategy.  Every picture tells a story, but not every picture tells the story that you want it to tell.  Pictures must be chosen carefully.  Some of the tests by which your picture should be evaluated include:

A focus group.
Perceptions derived from the culture.
Correlation with current events.
Conventional and societal etiquette.
Your gut.  (Never forget the gut check.)

The organization or creative that wants to connect with its audience must always remember the power of story.  That is why finding the right image is so very important.  Pick the right one and your story will be told for a very long time.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 7

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.  Mumaw defines visual resonance as:

“The ability to evoke or suggest personal images, memories, and emotions.”

To facilitate visual resonance, Mumaw highlights authenticity.  I agree with him in that our images must capture real moments of real people.  Audiences are jaded by the unreal continuously replacing the real.  People are smart enough to see through that.  To that point, Mumaw articulates what should be an immutable law of the creative:

“Just because we have the power of Photoshop does not mean we should wield the power of Photoshop.”

In a world in which the unreal has replaced the real for far too long, people are hungry for authenticity.  When they see that which is real connected to an organization, its brand elicits increased respect and power.  No organization can afford to lose that opportunity.

The organization or creative that wants to connect with its audience must always remember authenticity.  In a world that has too often been robbed of authenticity, people will beat a path to the door where they find it.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 5

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.

His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.  I love the way that Mumaw defines visual resonance:

“The ability to evoke or suggest personal images, memories, and emotions.”

When personal images, memories, and emotions conflate with the organization, a connection is naturally made and the brand is strengthened.  To the extent this occurs in an entertaining manner, the connection will be even stronger.  Therefore, the organization should never discount the entertainment element in building its brand.

All those personal images, memories, and emotions, combined with the entertainment element enable people to remember the brand.  Connections are made in so many potential ways.  If you remember a brand, that is good for that organization.  However, if you remember a brand connected with something entertaining, that is more potent.  The brand memory becomes more durable.

Certainly, some brands will be able to do this more easily than others will.  Some of this is industry specific.  However, the organization that excludes the entertainment element is limiting its reach.  Nevertheless, my guess is that too many organizations are choosing to limit their reach by limiting the entertainment element.  Fortunately, and especially with the advent of social media, that is slowly changing.

The organization or creative that wants to connect with its audience must continuously capitalize on personal images, memories, and emotions.  Add in the entertainment element and you have a surefire combination.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 3

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.

Mumaw talked much about emotion because it is the common human element that comes from our hearts.  More specifically, his point was that people read emotions into images based on our experiences.  That is powerful because it means that a picture will instantly command attention as it resonates with something in that person’s history.  It calls up something from within, creating a tighter connection.  This underscores how and why pictures have such potential.

Someone once said, a picture is worth a thousand words.  And that is probably a very low estimate.  At a recent Emfluence presentation, I learned that our brains process visuals about 60,000 times faster than text alone.  Here are the ways that pictures add value:

They quickly capture our attention.

They evoke emotions.

Once seen, the recipient’s brain does all the work!

Sometimes we like to make fun of the pictures we see in various ads, social media campaigns, and PR stunts.  However . . . it captured at least some attention, right?  I am not advocating being flippant, tasteless, or excessive.  I am advocating that any organization or creative that wants to be more effective in honing its brand cannot afford to ignore picture power.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
VISUAL RESONANCE—PART 1

As a member of the Social Media Club of Kansas City, I was privileged last month to attend a very exciting meeting at which Stefan Mumaw (Director of Creative Strategy at Hint) was the presenter.  Drawing from his rich experience, Mumaw did an excellent job sharing an amazing array of ideas, tips, and observations that would be helpful to anyone involved in social media strategy, advertising, and marketing.  His presentation was entitled “Visual Resonance.”  It focused on the characteristics of images and videos that help to evoke a passionate audience connection and result in increased shares.

An absolutely foundational point Mumaw emphasized involves how we use people in pictures.  Simply adding people to images does not equal adding humanity.  We need images that evoke emotion.  This is what makes the difference between a social media or advertising campaign that sizzles and one that falls flat.

This dynamic continues to fascinate me.  Although a person’s intellect of course plays into how that person will respond, a person’s intellect never represents the entire response.  When a person feels an emotional response, that is very real—heartfelt real.  It has the potential to go very good or very bad.  That is why the emotional element must never be underestimated in social media and advertising campaigns.  It packs more punch than we sometimes realize, but capitalizing on that punch in the right manner will make all the difference.

Mumaw had much more to offer.  Therefore, I will be sharing additional insights in future blog posts.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
READERS RESPOND TO THE CODE ISSUE

In June, I read the entire special double issue of Bloomberg Businessweek on computer coding (Paul Ford, “The Code Issue”, 6/15/15–6/28/15).  As I posted in late June, I knew then that I had come across something that powerfully stands out, something that is extra special.  The entire issue is devoted to helping the readers understand how computers work and what writing code involves.  It covers technical points, mathematics, the culture and quirks of coders, and how coding fits into the larger business world.  It is a very big topic to cover, yet Bloomberg Businessweek does so in a very informative, thorough, and occasionally humorous fashion.  I thoroughly enjoyed the lengthy read.

Although I feel the issue is an indispensable read in today’s world, I sadly realized that many folks simply would not take the time.  Therefore, beginning in late June and through yesterday’s blog post I simply shared what I felt were the most interesting, timely, and exquisite quotes from the issue and with minimal commentary from me.  Most of them speak for themselves very well.  Whether you are a hardcore geek, a coder, a PC novice, someone who just never thinks about coding, or a technophobe, perhaps you found something of value in at least some of the segments I shared.

I enjoyed all the responses and comments that came my way regarding some of the quotes.  Additionally, I was especially impressed by the feedback that went directly to Bloomberg Businessweek from its readers (“Feedback: What Is Code?” 6/29/15–7/5/15, p. 6).  For example, Matt Regan gives the issue this assessment:

“One of the most original and entertaining pieces I’ve read in a long time.  Excellent work!

And hilarious.”

The accolades from folks directly involved in the industry are especially meaningful.  Vishaal Kalwani writes:

“Literally every line of your article was something that resonated with me.  It seemed like you went into my head, took every original thought and feeling I have about programming, and then decorated it with beautiful prose.”

Karl Beecher offers words of commendation for the honesty of the piece in addressing some of the injustices in the field:

“As a fellow programmer, what I really appreciated was your attention to some of the undesirable behavior in the industry: the misogyny, the religious attitudes to programming languages, the endless conferences which often just reinforce tribalism and hierarchy, etc.  These are all things that have really bothered me over the years, yet I’ve usually found that no one else around me even sees these problems, making me feel something of an outsider in my own industry.  So it was really refreshing to read the words of a programmer who expresses these problems in a way that strikes such a chord with me.”

Finally, Marty Leisner commiserates over the perpetual problems of human nature, meetings, and logic while trying to execute coding projects:

“With software, you generally can’t have consensus—my experience in meetings is, whoever is the loudest for the longest wins.  If a car was done in software, the software engineer would say: ‘Let’s put the gas pedal on the ceiling and the brake pedal in the back seat.’  The manager, who has no clue, would say, ‘Sure, try it.’”

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...
People
Work
Occupation
Training Team Manager, Business Consultant, Freelance Corporate Writer, Ordained Minister, and Associate Faculty Member
Employment
  • Assemblies of God
    Ordained Minister, 1985 - present
  • Jimfreelance.com
    Freelance Corporate Writer, 1988 - present
  • Reliableinsights.com
    Business Consultant, 1999 - present
  • University of Phoenix
    Associate Faculty, 2010 - present
  • Tyco Integrated Security
    Training Team Manager, 2005 - present
  • Central Bible College
    Adjunct Faculty, 1997 - 2002
  • AT&T
    Quality Manager, 1996 - 2005
  • New Paradigm Business Enterprises
    Owner, 1995 - 1996
  • Assemblies of God
    Data Control Clerk, 1986 - 1988
  • Eastman Kodak
    Chemical Technician, 1978 - 1985
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Kansas City, Missouri
Story
Introduction
  • Assemblies of God Ordained Minister.
  • Tyco Integrated Security Training Team Manager.
  • Freelance Corporate Writer.
  • Business Consultant.
  • University of Phoenix Associate Faculty.
  • Passionate about all I do, and always carry an indelible sense of humor.
  • Although I am involved in many different disciplines, I continuously find they synergistically cross-pollinate to make me even more effective in each one.
  • Business blog www.blog.reliableinsights.com.
  • Business humor blog www.recallredeemerman.blogspot.com.

 

Bragging rights
Survived Y2K and three teenagers. Married 32 years to the same wonderful woman. Two-time winner of the AT&T Winning Spirit Award.
Education
  • University of Phoenix
    M.B.A., 2007 - 2009
  • Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
    D.Min. (all but project), 1993 - 1996
  • Assemblies of God Theological Seminary
    M.Div. Pastoral Counseling, 1986 - 1988
  • Central Bible College
    Theology and Philosophy, 1985 - 1985
  • Rochester Institute of Technology
    B.S. Chemistry, 1978 - 1983
  • Broome Community College
    A.A.S. Chemical Technology, 1975 - 1978
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Other names
James T. Meadows; Jim Meadows