Profile

Cover photo
James Meadows
Works at Assemblies of God
Attended University of Phoenix
Lives in Kansas City, Missouri
51,784 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
CONTINUOUS ATTENTION CALLS THE CUSTOMER

Last year Adobe issued its annual survey results on digital marketing.  The report provides some fascinating insights into how businesses are continuing to respond to and capitalize on social media.  I highly recommend the report.

A particularly important point in the report involves how organizations think about their investment in digital marketing.  Because digital marketing is itself a maturing market, optimization is achieved more through small steps as opposed to massive changes.  This requires continuous attention to the customer experience.  Will every business commit to that journey?  Not necessarily, as Adobe reports:

“The journey toward optimization is one that many start but few complete.  By its very nature, digital optimization is ongoing, with no true end point.  But as we enter this customer-focused marketing era, optimization should be seen as an organization-wide mindset that involves continuous, iterative improvement of digital experiences to achieve business goals.”

Unlike some things in life, you cannot set it and forget it.  However, what you can do is continuously keep your digital marketing at the top of its game by making regular small changes and measuring the results.  Because the marketplace is changing constantly, you can never assume that your current optimization configuration is settled law.  Rather, you must keep your finger on the pulse of your customers so that you know when changes to your approach are wise:

“An organization with a culture of optimization uses data to identify areas for improvement on their digital properties, tests ways to make those improvements, and makes frequent and iterative changes based on what works and what doesn’t.”

Therefore, as you commit to the ongoing refinement of your digital marketing strategy, you thereby enhance the quality of your customer experience.  In today’s competitive marketplace, that is a goal worth achieving.

http://adobe.ly/1O2CJCK

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
IN FROM THE OUTSIDE

Arnold Donald is the relatively new CEO of Carnival, a leading travel and pleasure cruise company.  In his effort to infuse new creativity throughout the organization, he capitalized on diversity principles.  He understood how important it is to bring in fresh blood.  Therefore he worked hard to bring in new-hires from other industries and simultaneously he worked to promote internal promising candidates from various backgrounds.  His efforts so far have been successful.

Mark Conroy, an industry consultant, observed Carnival’s recent positive growth and expansion.  His assessment links to a successful diversity strategy (Christopher Palmeri “Carnival Rocks the Boat” Bloomberg Businessweek, 11/16/15–11/22/15, pp. 22–23.):

“‘Mr. Donald has kind of shaken up the place.  . . . You had people who grew up in the business, and they’re always doing the same thing.  People from the outside look at things differently.’”  (p. 23)

Sometimes organizational leadership is hesitant to bring in someone “different.”  Maybe they are worried about rocking the boat.  Maybe they are worried about what new ideas might arise.  Maybe they are worried that the future will not match their vision.

Sometimes, the best move a company can make is to bring in someone “different.”  Rocking the boat with new ideas might be exactly what is needed to produce a future that blows everyone’s vision out of the water.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
THE ESSENCE OF LEADERSHIP

People do not always understand it, but leadership does not come from a title.  Leadership comes from relationship, influence, and persuasion.  The genuine leader must know how to build relationships and persuade people, and that will never happen without influence.

Bernard Tyson is the CEO of Kaiser Permanente.  In the 1990s, he was in a variety of VP roles.  Although he was not yet the CEO, Tyson continued to learn all he could about leadership.  He obviously understood the essence of leadership because he put it into practice.  That is what sustained him in all his roles to that point in time but it also prepared him for his future CEO role.  Tyson describes his experience (“How Did I Get Here?: Bernard Tyson” Bloomberg Businessweek, 9/28/15–10/4/15, p. 96):

“I learned how to lead by selling and influencing, as opposed to having complete control.”

The true leader is never the person with the title.  It is always the person with the influence.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
MOTIVATIONS FROM THE HEART

Doing a job for a wage is honorable.  More honorable still is doing a job from the heart independent of the wage.  Sometimes we perform a certain job simply because we are being paid to do it.  Yet those times when we perform a job because our heart is in it raises the endeavor to a new plane.

Whether the motivation is merely money or passionately personal, we should monitor our motivation.  Why?  Because it can tell us a lot about ourselves and how effective we might be in the job we are doing.

Bernard Tyson is the CEO of Kaiser Permanente.  He shares a compelling personal insight behind his career motivations (“How Did I Get Here?: Bernard Tyson” Bloomberg Businessweek, 9/28/15–10/4/15, p. 96):

“My mom was sick from diabetes, so we were in hospitals a lot, and I decided I wanted to run my own.”

Our careers can grow from many different motivations ranging from merely money to the passionately personal.  I have a feeling the passionately personal breeds the greatest success.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
KNOWING WHAT IS NOT GUARANTEED

In business and in life in general, some situations are guaranteed and some are not.  Wise is the person that understands the difference.  Some of these situations involve the mundane, some involve life and death, and some fall somewhere in between those two extremes.  Wise is the person that keeps the situation’s location on that continuum in proper perspective.

I think that periodic review of these truths is time well spent.  Sometimes making that time is difficult, especially if you are anything like me.  I have so much to keep on my mind and so little mind on which to keep it.  Maybe you don’t have that problem, but I sure do.

Bernard Tyson is the CEO of Kaiser Permanente.  He reflects pointedly on a rather significant item related to guarantees (“How Did I Get Here?: Bernard Tyson” Bloomberg Businessweek, 9/28/15–10/4/15, p. 96):

“No one is promised the end of today.”

Thinking similarly in another age, Emily Dickinson mused:

“Because I could not stop for Death,

He kindly stopped for me.”

Within the last year or so, I have endured the deaths of a significant number of friends, associates, and relatives.  It simply seemed to be a season in which an unusually high number of people I know did not reach “the end of today.”  We all are painfully aware that those are never easy times.  Unfortunately, they are largely unavoidable times.

Because no one is promised the end of today, we should live each day in such a manner that we would have no regrets if it were our last day.  That is a tall task.  I suspect it is a task that if fulfilled, we would all find ourselves to be better people, our businesses to be better enterprises, and this world to be a better place.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
THE INSTANT CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE

Businesses talk a lot about the importance of the customer experience, what leads up to it, what goes into it, and how important it is.  Let’s face it: everything in your business has to be working toward an excellent customer experience if you are serious about that goal.  One item that is not always addressed is simply the customer experience that occurs by just a moment’s exposure.  I call this the instant customer experience.

Bernard Tyson is the CEO of Kaiser Permanente.  I love the way he captures this essence of the instant customer experience (“How Did I Get Here?: Bernard Tyson” Bloomberg Businessweek, 9/28/15–10/4/15, p. 96):

“I still do hospital visits, and I can tell how well it’s run in a couple minutes:  How clean are the floors?  How does the staff respond?  What’s the vibe?”

If the instant customer experience is not good, the customer may not stick around to enjoy the full customer experience.  All those individual exposures (whatever they may be) instantly communicate a customer experience.  The only question is will it be an excellent customer experience or something less?  You decide.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
HIPPITY HOP LIVING

Have Wi-Fi, will travel seems to be the motto of the day anymore.  Our ubiquitous, powerful technology has enabled increasingly greater freedoms in what we do for a living and how we do it.  This also translates to more options in where you lay your head at night.  A new company called Common is capitalizing on these trends by creating flexible co-living arrangements catering to the urbanite Internet-enabled worker as reported by Kyle Chayka (“Putting the App in Apartment” Bloomberg Businessweek, 11/16/15–11/22/15, pp. 33–34):

“Common is part of a trend called co-living, a Silicon Valley spin on the hippie collectives from California’s past.  It’s selling a lifestyle enabled by the Internet: Communes for digital nomads.  ‘You can stay in one place and move anytime to another place.  It’s like having an apartment everywhere,’ says Kirill Sopot, co-founder of San Francisco’s Coliving Club, a chain of four houses.” (p. 34)

Using online flexible contracts, renters within the building can change from one bedroom to another or even upgrade to full apartments as needed.  Commons is not the only company to satisfy this niche.  Other companies include WeWork, Nest Copenhagen, Caravanserai, Quantierra, Embassy Network, and Roomi, to name a few.

Real estate has always been an exciting market-driven venture.  It appears that the real estate market is becoming ever more flexible in what works, in more ways than one.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...
In his circles
62 people

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
DIGITAL MARKETING PRIORITIZATION

Last year Adobe issued its annual survey results on digital marketing.  The report provides some fascinating insights into how businesses are continuing to respond to and capitalize on social media.  I highly recommend the report.

One of the first insights that stood out to me are what the numbers say about how intensely (or how mildly) organizations are embracing all that digital marketing has to offer.  A key question asked was “does your organization have initiatives in place to mature your digital marketing?”  Note the interesting spread in the results:

45%—My organization does not formalize plans.

36%—There are priorities in place this year that will help.

19%—We make specific plans and investments to mature.

For a long time, social media and digital marketing were on the cutting edge.  Not every business seriously considered them.  Many today still don’t.  Be that as it may, the organizations that want to maximize their target audience influence are the organizations that make digital marketing a top priority.

And that is why the numbers are so interesting to me.  Only 19% of the respondents were able to affirm that they make specific plans and investments to mature their digital marketing programs.  There is a reason it is called the cutting edge.  It appears that the cutting edge today is only 19%.

Repeatedly, I have seen this to be true: the organizations that make social media and digital marketing a top priority are the organizations that thrive.  The ones that don’t always seem to have a good excuse, but good excuses don’t make payroll.

http://adobe.ly/1O2CJCK

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
SEEING YOUR BLIND SPOTS

Can you see your own blind spots?  By definition of course, the answer is no.  What is true for a person is true for a corporation.  That is why diversity is so important to individuals and to corporations.

Jan Swarz is the president of Princess Cruises.  One day in a corporate meeting, the discussions involved what should be done about bedding on the company’s 18 ships.  After lots of talk about various aspects of mattress construction and fabrics, Jan exposed a blind spot by highlighting the menopause situation (Christopher Palmeri “Carnival Rocks the Boat” Bloomberg Businessweek, 11/16/15–11/22/15, pp. 22–23. 96):

“That’s something few men would have brought up at a high-level corporate meeting.  But the average Princess guest is 53 years old, Swartz says, and she’d gotten an earful from some of them about the night sweats and hot flashes associated with menopause.  So she pushed her staff to find duvets that look plush without trapping too much heat and to design the bedding in layers that could easily be taken on and off.”  (p. 22)

Another problem solved because someone on a team with a different viewpoint spoke!  This is how diversity works.  It doesn’t matter how smart you or your team might be.  Even genius requires perspective for its wisest application.  Diversity can bring that needed perspective.

As it turns out, Arnold Donald (the CEO) had appointed Swartz to her position with the specific purpose of stimulating diverse thinking.  And it worked.  And Donald has continued to look for ways to diversify his staff so that Princess Cruises will continue to benefit from diversity.  He clearly understands its value as he affirms:

“‘I guarantee if you get a diverse group of people aligned around a common objective with a process to work together, they will out-engineer, out-solution a homogeneous team 90 percent of the time and create things none of them alone would have created.’” (p. 22)

The next time your team has an important objective to achieve, remember that it will be even more important that you involve a diversity of people . . . unless of course, you are happy about all your blind spots.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
UNPACKING TOO SOON

We never know for sure where life is going to take us. Even when we think we do know, that very knowledge can be self-limiting. Let’s face it—has anyone among us always known exactly what we needed? Some of the time, yes, but not all the time.

Sometimes we carry preconceived notions into a new role. Not every one of those preconceived notions is necessarily accurate or realistic. Sometimes it is difficult to get over ourselves and come to that point where we realize we do not have all the answers. Moreover, not having all the answers is okay.

Bernard Tyson is the CEO of Kaiser Permanente. In 1992 (a long time before his present role), he became the CEO of the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in Santa Rosa. He also had some preconceived notions. Reflecting on those preconceived notions, Tyson learned that he may have unpacked too soon (“How Did I Get Here?: Bernard Tyson” Bloomberg Businessweek, 9/28/15–10/4/15, p. 96):

“I thought I had arrived—I never thought it would only last for a year.”

We must choose to be flexible. That flexibility requires that we cast aside our preconceived notions. I was once asked to fill the pulpit of a church for just four Sundays. At least that was my preconceived notion. Those four Sundays turned into a successful two-year ministry as the senior pastor.

We never know how, when, and where opportunity will knock. If we are willing to dismiss our preconceived notions, then maybe we can enter into something new and exciting.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
ADVICE ON RECEIVING ADVICE

Sometimes we come across the most amazing items when we take other people’s advice.  If another person’s advice pushes your buttons and you are able to improve your life through it, then more power to you!  Then of course, we know that some advice is not worth contemplating.

Some rather humorous pieces of advice (with or without merit) come our way too.  Bernard Tyson is the CEO of Kaiser Permanente.  He shares a strong yet humorous word of advice (“How Did I Get Here?: Bernard Tyson” Bloomberg Businessweek, 9/28/15–10/4/15, p. 96):

“Drink black coffee.  My uncle told me it impresses people and puts the fear of God in them.”

Personally, I’m not sure if someone drinking black coffee impresses me or if I just feel sorry for that person.  Regardless, I don’t think I will take that advice.  I can find other ways to impress people.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...

James Meadows

Shared publicly  - 
 
THE MOST IMPORTANT PERSON

In any organization we can banter about who is the most important person.  Whether it is inflated egos, a genuine desire to make a difference in people’s lives, or anything in between, concerns about individual importance exist.  That is why it is always refreshing to hear from someone who puts importance in proper perspective.  Bernard Tyson expresses this concept well.

Tyson is the CEO of Kaiser Permanente.  Reflecting on his own position in his organization, here is how he keeps his role in perspective (“How Did I Get Here?: Bernard Tyson” Bloomberg Businessweek, 9/28/15–10/4/15, p. 96):

“My role is significant but not the most important in the organization.”

Executive leadership is incredibly significant, but it is not necessarily the most important.  The untold numbers of colleagues with whom the leader works are ultimately extremely important.  If it wasn’t for them, the executive leader’s role would be greatly hampered.  Genuine leaders recognizes these universal truths.

The next time that you or I start to think about how important our roles are, let’s stop and ponder the importance of all the colleagues with whom we work.  Ultimately, I think what is most important is what we can do working together, rather than thinking about the person in the mirror.  That is a challenge that probably will keep us all busy every single day.

[Today’s post— Blog.reliableinsights.com.]
1
Add a comment...
People
In his circles
62 people
Work
Occupation
Training Team Manager, Business Consultant, Freelance Corporate Writer, Ordained Minister, and Associate Faculty Member
Employment
  • Assemblies of God
    Ordained Minister, 1985 - present
  • Jimfreelance.com
    Freelance Corporate Writer, 1988 - present
  • Reliableinsights.com
    Business Consultant, 1999 - present
  • University of Phoenix
    Associate Faculty, 2010 - present
  • Tyco Integrated Security
    Training Team Manager, 2005 - present
  • Central Bible College
    Adjunct Faculty, 1997 - 2002
  • AT&T
    Quality Manager, 1996 - 2005
  • New Paradigm Business Enterprises
    Owner, 1995 - 1996
  • Assemblies of God
    Data Control Clerk, 1986 - 1988
  • Eastman Kodak
    Chemical Technician, 1978 - 1985
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Kansas City, Missouri
Story
Introduction
  • Assemblies of God Ordained Minister.
  • Tyco Integrated Security Training Team Manager.
  • Freelance Corporate Writer.
  • Business Consultant.
  • University of Phoenix Associate Faculty.
  • Passionate about all I do, and always carry an indelible sense of humor.
  • Although I am involved in many different disciplines, I continuously find they synergistically cross-pollinate to make me even more effective in each one.
  • Business blog www.blog.reliableinsights.com.
  • Business humor blog www.recallredeemerman.blogspot.com.

 

Bragging rights
Survived Y2K and three teenagers. Married 32 years to the same wonderful woman. Two-time winner of the AT&T Winning Spirit Award.
Education
  • University of Phoenix
    M.B.A., 2007 - 2009
  • Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary
    D.Min. (all but project), 1993 - 1996
  • Assemblies of God Theological Seminary
    M.Div. Pastoral Counseling, 1986 - 1988
  • Central Bible College
    Theology and Philosophy, 1985 - 1985
  • Rochester Institute of Technology
    B.S. Chemistry, 1978 - 1983
  • Broome Community College
    A.A.S. Chemical Technology, 1975 - 1978
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married
Other names
James T. Meadows; Jim Meadows