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h/t +Stefan Andersson 

Except the gynosome isn't a penis. As Jason Goldman explains in an article about the gynosome, this is a hitherto unknown form of sexual organ in the animal kingdom. When female members of the Brazilian bug species Neotrogla mate with males, they insert their gynosomes into the male's sexual organ. Once inside the male's body, the gynosome inflates and grows spines, then absorbs both sperm and nutrients from the male for several days.

I'm sorry, but does this sound like a penis to you? When was the last time you found a penis that grew spines, absorbed nutrients, remained erect for 75 hours, or allowed its owner to get pregnant? Pretty much the only thing this organ has in common with a penis is that it's used to penetrate a partner during sex.

http://io9.com/your-penis-is-getting-in-the-way-of-my-science-1564473352
Earlier today, scientists announced they'd discovered an insect with a new kind of female sex organ. It looks a bit like a penis, and is called a gynosome. But almost every news outlet covered the story by describing the insects as "females with penises." This isn't just painfully wrong -- it's bad for science.
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Alain Van Hout's profile photoÆthelfeld Engelchen's profile photoOne Million People who accept Evolution's profile photo
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I still don't get it. Might have to read her article again after a cup of tea!
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In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises
40-70 hours?? Ooooohhh....that is indeed very impressive! 
:P

"Although sex-role reversal has been identified in several different animals, Neotrogla is the only example in which the intromittent organ is also reversed," says Kazunori Yoshizawa from Hokkaido University in Japan.

During copulation, which lasts an impressive 40 to 70 hours, female insects insert an elaborate, penis-like organ into males' much-reduced, vagina-like opening. The researchers speculate that the insects' sex organs and sex-role reversal may have been driven over evolutionary time by the resource-poor cave environment in which the bugs live. Males of the genus provide females with nutritious seminal gifts in addition to sperm, making it advantageous for females to mate at a higher rate.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140417101146.htm
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+Alain Van Hout, I was a bit unspecific in the name of brevity. I've added "in general", to be more specific.

Yes, the examples you cite are quite okay, but I think I've seen worse headlines regarding this discovery.

I also agree with you that the io9 post was unbalanced. I just quit reading when it began ranting at perceived problems.
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These compounds make up the majority of their skin secretions and act as a first line of defense against bacteria and other microorganisms that thrive in the wet places frogs, toads, salamanders and other amphibians live. A previous study identified on the skin of the Russian Brown frog 21 substances with antibiotic and other potential medical activity. Lebedev’s team set out to find more of these potential medical treasures.

via +Kristof Van Hees 
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Awww :~D
 
Monkey Planet

The Beeb has a wonderful new series featuring Professor George McGavin from the University of Oxford. Titled Monkey Planet, it describes the various species of primates that inhabit our planet. The footage is amazing, which isn't a surprise given it's a BBC Nature documentary. I think my favourite part so far was this behind-the-scenes clip of Bonobos. They are so adorably playful and boisterous!

If you have access to the BBC iPlayer (or ahem, a handy plugin that allows you to view UK content) this series is definitely worth checking out: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01r52gr

+Erin Kane this might be of interest to you, if you haven't seen it already!

#ScienceEveryday  
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+Hurol Aslan 
Your guess is as good as mine...
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h/t +Stefan Andersson 

Except the gynosome isn't a penis. As Jason Goldman explains in an article about the gynosome, this is a hitherto unknown form of sexual organ in the animal kingdom. When female members of the Brazilian bug species Neotrogla mate with males, they insert their gynosomes into the male's sexual organ. Once inside the male's body, the gynosome inflates and grows spines, then absorbs both sperm and nutrients from the male for several days.

I'm sorry, but does this sound like a penis to you? When was the last time you found a penis that grew spines, absorbed nutrients, remained erect for 75 hours, or allowed its owner to get pregnant? Pretty much the only thing this organ has in common with a penis is that it's used to penetrate a partner during sex.

http://io9.com/your-penis-is-getting-in-the-way-of-my-science-1564473352
Earlier today, scientists announced they'd discovered an insect with a new kind of female sex organ. It looks a bit like a penis, and is called a gynosome. But almost every news outlet covered the story by describing the insects as "females with penises." This isn't just painfully wrong -- it's bad for science.
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Happy Easter to those who celebrate :-)
Have a great weekend (we've got a loooong bank holiday weekend! Yayy!!) to those who don't celebrate, and hope to see you on the other side.
;-)
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+Paulina Friedman
I love going for these midnight masses in Christmas, Easter and New Year. I don't believe in the theology behind it but these are occasions for great celebration, particularly in the romantic atmosphere of night. In kerala, India where I live, we never have winters and midnight temperature is always between 17-25 c. So it feels great. The only thing which can spoil the fun is Kerala's national bird, the mosquito. But a nice moquito repellent takes care of that.
Happy Easter!
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We are all dreamers...
Who doesn't? :D
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