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Kalluther Qel'Droma
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When a Leech uses alchemicals from their bandolier, does that count against their Load?

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Hiya folks, haven't checked out blades since v2 a while back. Read through a fair bit of v7 (not all though). Quite liking the changes I'm seeing. I've noticed certain things have been emphasized more or clarified to help get the intent behind the rules and make running the game a lot smoother.

However, I do have a question about the probability spread of the core rules mechanic. I'm not sure if it should go into the game question or discussion subheading, but here goes.

6 or 6+ results are "full successes."
4/5 are success with complication.

Ignoring the fact that 4/5 are also successes, and just looking at the potential for free and clear "full successes," the maximum dice a character could have are 4. If they push themselves, they can get up to 5 (I seem to recall you can now push or devil's bargain. Not both. Could be wrong though.).

Looking at the math of that, at 4 die - free and clear success happens 51% of the time, or ~60% at 5 die. (http://anydice.com/program/91c0)

Ok, good so far. I've been thinking about what this probability spread implies for the fiction of the game, and here is where my question lies. Characters with actions rated at 4 have a little over 50% chance for free and clear success. In any other game, I would have said, "how odd, they're the upper limit of what a human can be in this game.. and they can only get through things without mucking them up 50% of the time?" Well part of this could be explained by the fact that these are action ratings not skill ratings. Since actions are a somewhat nebulous rating that covers not only competence but a level of je ne sais quas, I'm guessing that there is some other factor at work beyond just your skill at Prowling or Skirmishing.

The conclusion I've come up with is, perhaps the basic premise is that the world is just this jacked up. In previous editions there was a section talking about how rolling should be done more sparsely than in a traditional RPG like dnd (didnt find that section in v7, assuming it still applies though or I'm just blind). So the characters are only rolling for situations where at best they have a 50/50 shot of making it through unscathed.

If this is the case, this idea would ripple out to affect how different phases of the game are handled. At character creation, if a character has 2 ranks in an action, they're dealing with situations where a character of that competence has only a 50/50 shot of making it through unscathed. As they progress to be that character with 4 ranks in an action, they just no longer roll for a situation that a 2 rank character might. Does this analysis seem correct?

To be clear, I'm not expressing any dissatisfaction, just trying to use the mechanics to guide how the fiction is to be approached. Get a sense of how the stakes increase as play continues.

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Hiya folks! Took forever, but here's the next episode of my crew's Mythic Mortal play through. Enjoy more Capitalist Crusader hijinks. Ooh, BTW, it's def nsfw.

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Well, here's an AP of Mythic Mortals when it's not run by David. Figured I'd throw this down in the group in case anyone is ghosting here wondering how the game runs.  The answer is: super smooth, super fun. I hope you all enjoy listening to this as much as we enjoyed playing the game. Just a blast all around! 

In regards to DC for tricks and out of combat rolls (the discussion at the end of the game):
I'm thinking this is actually a question which actually holds true for a lot of games, namely, when do you call for a roll?
I've come to find my answer to that question is markedly different from others, and I really think the answer depends on each individual GMs gaming style. However, for your purposes, I think you really need to decide what is critical or important for your game. If the whole thing lives in combat, and out of combat is a chance to just roleplay and move plot along, then I think you could safely say no rolls required.

Furthermore, to really highlight the theme of each play mat, you might include in an optional rules section: feats of strength are DC 9 for brutes, stealth actions are dc 9 for sneaks, hunting/tracking is DC 9 for hunters, Crafting is Dc 9 for Brewers. And then just make the blanket statement, for everyone else, the DC to perform a trick is 7 unless otherwise specified. So, a Brewer doing a feat of strength has to hit a 7, but any crafting would be DC 9. Basically, the formula would be, 1) A standard target number for all classes to perform any kind of trick. 2) A specified target number to do particular kinds of actions that fall within the thematic purview of a Play-Mat

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As requested. A guide to how I set-up my roll20 for Mythic Mortals. This is not the only way, but it certainly is a way.

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This is my roll20 Set-up for tonight's Mythic Mortals one-shot. Each player has a space for their "Mat."  Larger rectangles are for their Card Draws. Smaller Squares are for their Stability Track. Game starts in 2 hours. Got a full roster. I'm pretty pumped to roll out the first adventure of the Capitalist Crusaders, America's Mightiest, Fiscally Responsible Heroes.

Side-note: Mr. Schirduan, would you like me to send you an audio recording of this? I was planning on making a podcast ep out of the session (provided it works out well). But in either event I can send you a copy so you have a sense of how it runs when it's not you running it :).
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Running a quick one-off of Mythic Mortals to test it out this Saturday at 10:30PM eastern on roll20. Got room for 1 more player. So if anyone is willing to help me try it out, let me know or message me on roll20 (username Luzelli).

I can bullshit my way through this, but I'd like to hear if the community has a more concrete notion on how to handle this:

When an Enemy Faction is attempting to gather information on the PCs, the QS says the PCs may resist this by making a roll.  What roll would that be? As worded, I feel like that means they make some kind of Effect roll to resist the enemy's gather info.  But could there be an action roll involved as well?

Here's what I'm thinking of doing: The PCs are met with a "news-reporter" who's asking them about the crimes they were picked up by the police for. This guy is going to try and get an interview in their base and all that jazz so he can talk to them and "get their side of the story as he's investigating police corruption."  Any thoughts on how I should let the PCs resist this attempt at gathering info on them?

I Done Fucked Up. (<---That's the TLDR; WARNING Long post ahead)

So, Saturday I ran my first game of Blades.  Boy was it disastrous.  90 to 95% of that was my fault. We started with character creation, but a lot of the players were so excited they already brought characters to the table. Mistake number 1. I relented and let some of the folk get a jump start at character creation, rather than force everyone to do it together at session 0. The result? People came in with very different expectations of play style. The end result was a chaotic mess. Characters that really shouldn't have been in a crew were suddenly found working together.  Ok, so that's not too big of a problem, goof on my part. Talked to everyone, there's a bit of retconning/tinkering that's gonna go on so our official session 1 will run a lot smoother.  Now for the real major fuck-ups.

Remember I said this was Session 0? Well 50% of the time was spent on Crew Creation (expected) and the rest was spent running through a light prologue section. My intentions were 1) Introduce the characters to the other players, the world, and myself; 2) Give everyone some practice with the Action-Effect mechanics. Let them see how the dice-pools are constructed and how the results are put into play. Sounds noble and pure right? Good thing to get people to learn before they're in a high pressure environment no? WRONG!

So, I opened up with the PCs being rounded up by Inspectors. I basically stole the opening scene for The Wire Season 5, complete with Bunk's speech about how staying silent don't work unless you some kind of criminal mastermind. Then I went around and had him throw baseless accusations at each of the PCs to see how they would react and then give them a moment to tell everyone about their character, what they look like, etc etc. So, the PCs find out they're being falsely accused; someone was witnessing on them having been in an area doing some illegal spirit snatching and also murdering a civilian who wasn't in the game. How did this go wrong? Well at it's core, from what I can tell, Blades is a resource management game. What I should have said was, "Hey guys, this is just a prologue. We're doing this just to introduce characters and give you a chance to show us a bit of what they're like." Instead I said, "Ok, we're just gonna do a little prologue."  Since I didn't include the last bit there, the PCs (understandably) began to work up ways to get outta that situation. Literally, my next move was going to be, Inspector leaves, your lawyer shows up and gets you released (cause ya know, of course they'd have a "criminal" lawyer).

The end result? Plenty of unnecessary shenanigans were put into effect. Dice were thrown around like it was a back-alley craps game, and quite honestly, none of this was important enough for us to waste our time on it.  What wooould have been better is if I said, "Ok, I can tell you guys are about to try some shennanigans to get out of this mess, would you like to make a teamwork action out of this?"  Then I could have got a bit of narration from everyone of how they work as a unit and then it could have all been handled in one roll. But noooo, i wanted to teach them how the dice mechanics work right? So like a fucking idiot I have them roll for everything under the sun.  "Oh you'd like to do some Magnitude 1 channeling would you? Ok, roll a bunch of bullshit. Oh yeah, the danger here isn't enough to actually warrant a roll, but i feel like i need more virtual dice in my life, so lets just hit that macro."  That was me.  Bad me.   After the fact I went through the QS and reread the section on handling inconsequential moments with one blanket roll, did a facepalm and drank my sorrows away.

The end result of all this foolishness is everyone (myself included) felt like we wasted our time on something that I should have said, "Yo, let me see what your characters are like. Put the dice away, enjoy getting in the skin of this other person, and I'll hook you up with your first score. After which point, we'll open up the board to the players and you guys take the steering wheel."  Basically, I ran the game like a traditional RPG.  Which it is not.  It is something different entirely. Works in a different way. I'm not saying this is a bad thing, I'm saying it's very different to other kinds of games I've run. I've been told it follows a similar thematic philosophy as Hillfolk. In terms of how it is to be GM'd i mean.

In conclusion, what did I learn:
1) STICK TO THE SCORE --- DOWNTIME - SCORE paradigm.
You can roleplay those moments in between, that's cool. But unless they are absolutely critical to what's happening, just let things be. Save the rolls for stuff that truly matters. And given the way things are in blades, let the players know upfront "Hey guys, this is just going to be a characterization scene so you can present your character to us and we can all get a better understanding of what they're like and the group dynamic."

2) If the player doesn't give a damn about the obstacle.. let it all happen.  One of my players wanted to snatch something off the detective's cork board in the inspector's station. I told him, "Ya know, there are a lot of folk around here. If you just try to snatch something off the board, they're gonna try to stop you." To which he said, ok cool. But then I did a bit of GM trickery and got him into thinking he shouldn't be cool with that outcome. Bad me. I should have said, "Ok, you grab the notecard that has a bit of info about yourself on it. And then an inspector notices and stops you being like 'Hey! What do you think you're doing, keep your hands to yourself scumbag!'"  If he was cool w/ being caught, who am I to stop it?  SO LET THINGS RIDE!
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