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Sherrill Farms
Texas hay farm
Texas hay farm
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Sherrill Farms's posts

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Over $1000 learning how to help bees properly. Ouch.

The Cost of Keeping Bees https://thebillfold.com/the-cost-of-keeping-bees-accf7e1bc85b?source=rss----cd5e31c1d068---4

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A fresh dose of spring lambs does everybody some good -

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Hay nets stretch your hay and help you maintain your easy keeper's proper weight.

"One study* demonstrated that mature horses fed off of the stall floor consumed hay at a rate of 3.3 lb (1.5 kg) per hour, while those fed from a slow-feed haynet with 1-inch (2.54-cm) holes consumed 1.9 lb (0.86 kg) per hour. Using the example above, eight flakes of hay, or 24 lb (11 kg), would give the horse a little over seven hours of chew time. If the same horse were to eat the eight flakes from a slow-feed haynet, as described above, it would take nearly 13 hours of time."

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Think the first cutting hay is undesirable? Take another look...

“A lot of producers think the second and third cutting are the best because they look good, but they are usually the lowest in nutritional quality,” he said. “As temperatures rise throughout the season, plants produce more lignin and that reduces digestibility.”

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Neighbors helping neighbors-

"So far the group has taken in roughly 90 calves. That number is still rising even days after the fire."

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If you're in Texas and you're interested in fence laws Texas AgriLife is offering a webinar on Wednesday of next week.

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Our thoughts are with the Canadian cattlemen who are affected by the TB testing being conducted in the Alberta area.



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"Hay should be tested for nutritional quality, which will give producers the necessary information to help determine supplementation requirements."

"...to maintain its body condition, a lactating cow would require hay that is about 11.5 percent protein and 62-63 percent total digestible nutrients, or TDN. A dry cow in late gestation would need about 8 percent protein and 55 percent TDN."


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"Increasing the forage in a horse's diet will help prevent impactions and will also reduce the risk of hypothermia (low body temperature). Horses require more calories in the winter just to stay warm, and the body's fermentation process for digesting hay and roughage also generates heat that helps maintain body temperature. The best colic prevention in this situation is to allow a horse 24-hour forage access so the fermentation process never slows or stops. Adding grain and sweet feed supplements (if warranted) is fine, but they do not provide the same warming and digestive benefits as a continual forage supply."

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"The energy that comes from hay has unique advantages. Unlike starch and sugar calories, which peak quickly then bottom out, fermentation of fiber and complex plant carbohydrates that are not digestible in the small intestine produces a steady, uninterrupted flow of volatile fatty acids (VFAs)."
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