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Clark Shah-Nelson
153 followers -
education + technology X online + education
education + technology X online + education

153 followers
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Clark Shah-Nelson commented on a post on Blogger.
Hi Wendy - and thanks for sharing your experience. It's really unfortunate that you had such a negative experience - something I would certainly not wish upon anyone! This was definitely a first time major learning experience for us, and from what I saw on all ends (virtual users, facilitators, presenters, on-site attendees) - for most of the others involved. A lot of people did not quite know how to react to such a new thing - some were shy being on camera and didn't want to sit at a kubi table, some were just amazed to hear and see a person on the other end moving the camera. Definitely a lot of input to chew on for a next iteration! - We had a vast array of experiences to reflect upon - and the session you were involved with was particularly cursed - in that they had switched days/times and the primary stream with MediaSite hadn't been changed - thus making us scramble to figure out why there was no streaming going on rather than being able to focus on the other aspects. We also quickly discovered that what is really needed is, in addition to someone in the room, 1 experienced virtual facilitator on each Kubi - who can manage microphones, help with introductions as people come in, help with moving the camera/Kubi, etc. (We had 1 for the whole room (Wendy for this session), with 4 Kubis - and while it worked in many sessions, with that person visiting all 4 Kubis, it was too many. I would probably not have more than a couple Kubis in the room or would limit the number based on the number of people you have to support the conversations. Likewise, we had a bunch of Kubis at various locations and I would limit that to just 1-2 - again, based on how many volunteers you have to facilitate). There were too many options, and didn't ever seem to be a convergence of a bunch of virtual attendees communicating with one another - as well as with the on-site group. (I did, however, personally see evidence of some great interaction between virtual and on-site folks in the Innovation Lab, at least.) We have some data to look at, regarding who/when/how many people logged into the various Kubis, I look forward to analyzing some of that.

We really wanted to take the first step at providing more of an interactive experience than the past OLC events - which normally have streaming audio, slides, and text chat only - and zero ability to see other portions of the conference like the plug-in lounge, Innovation Lab, or other exhibitors. In fact, we did something similar at the Accelerate event last November in a Virtually Connecting session when I took it "on the road" to the Technology Test Kitchen -(https://youtu.be/yUZHVLeufcA) extending the reach for virtual participants in a small way. In the majority of CTW sessions, we accomplished this first step - and some had great conversations and interactions between the virtual and on-site audience. Our most successful sessions included very experienced virtual facilitators, who got on early, introduced themselves, popped onto all the various kubis, and engaged with both the other virtual attendees and the folks at the table. (Another lesson learned from the first iteration - "virtual buddy" needed on every kubi!)

I think one aspect that you downplay in your post is the amount of advocacy you had in the room, particularly at table 1. While I was troubleshooting the audio, and had all but given up since we could hear you and I could see no further reason why you couldn't hear us, someone at the table had the great idea to write notes to you. Quick thinking! I noticed that the people at that table continued to include you and work with you all the way up until you got your audio issue figured out on your end. In fact, they were so concerned, they came up and informed me after the session about what had happened. They were truly concerned and hung in there, didn't give up. This might be partially because they had larger buy-in - they had their own CTW session on Friday - (you can see a bit of their session in this video - one of the 2 Kubis that were both engaged in conversation with the table https://twitter.com/clarkshahnelson/status/850392914295492608 ) These folks really embraced and worked with the technology in a very inclusive way that was truly inspiring. I wish you had hung in there for the second session you were going to facilitate, perhaps it might have turned things around for you.

So yeah, we had some fails, and it's really too bad that you (or anyone) had to experience that. It would be incredible if we could pull something like this off in a way that really brings people into the conference on a more level playing field. I like the concept of the level playing field with respect to videoconferencing. In many meetings, there's a phone thingy in the middle of the table, and the people on it are like second class citizens. There's a kind of class continuum in these meetings. The only way to truly level the playing field is everyone on site, or everyone virtual, in my opinion. So Kubis help, but still don't entirely level the playing field. Even in something like YouTube Live, those who are watching the stream are limited to Q&A text response - not the same as being on audio/video or in the room. We've come a LONG way in videoconferencing, virtual meetings, and bridging gaps of distance, but I'd say we still have a long way to go. Things like Virtually Connecting, and conference Kubis are brothers and sisters in the connection family: trying to increase interactivity, dialog, inclusion and connection, and decrease isolation and passivity. It'll take some positive and some negative experiences along the way - a journey well worth taking. Thank you for sticking your tech neck out and giving it a whirl. May the lessons learned be to the benefit of future iterations and generations!

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Clark Shah-Nelson commented on a post on Blogger.
Fantastic post!

This part especially resonated:

+Recommendation engines that track what sort of content works for individual people.
+Technology that allows individual students to share and curate the material that works for them.
+Systems for students and faculty to create, fork, and improve content they use.
+Pedagogy that allows multiple approaches to (and ultimately multiple interpretations of) course goals.

Publishers, content creators, and LMS companies, take note! The current systems are not meta enough. The LMS in general is still far too oriented toward instructor-created content on lockdown, and very limited ability of students to do their own thing. I would add also more deep filtering capability: where students can filter content and/or things like discussion posts or creations by other students based on a large number of variables (geography, respected/followed students, certain types or aspects of content or pedagogical activities, etc...)

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Well lookee there, meditation and mindfulness have a much larger course presence on Coursera: https://lnkd.in/etSCkRM

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Global blended e-learning market growth 2015-19 projected at 11.091% https://lnkd.in/eH5KxxS

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Trends from #SXSWedu session proposals from @edsurge: instructional strategies, educational equality lead the heap: https://lnkd.in/e_9HhGg

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Clark Shah-Nelson commented on a post on Blogger.
This seems to epitomize the current state of data analytics at this point - a lot of great ideas, and some not as-of-yet quite fully baked ones, with few fully actualized results.  A lot of data all dressed up with nowhere to go. Might be nice if eventually some sort of data analytics standards were to evolve out of this. If you coupled that with increased openness, organizations or institutions who want to participate in sharing could do so and provide standardized, meaningful, apples to apples data across the board.

The other aspect, as Phil mentioned: the data should help answer key questions about/for students, in order to further their success, or help solve key issues in the teaching and learning process - for faculty or the institution. 

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If you haven't already checked it out, you may be interested to see the new e-Literate TV series of videos as conversation starters for higher education. The first 3 episodes were filmed at #Educause13 in Anaheim. Parts 2 and 3 are about online education and #MOOCs, and feature important ideas and questions for institution consideration and dialog. 

Michael Feldstein and Phil Hill also released a series of interviews from the December 2013 MOOC Resarch Initiative (#MRI13) on their YouTube Channel. http://www.youtube.com/channel/UC36HyLul95qjKO0CT-DPlmA

This week's trending Twitter hashtag? Follow #sxswedu to see what's going in in Austin, TX today and tomorrow.

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fantastic production and way to explain several concepts, better than RSA animate: The #GlobalPOV Project: "Who is Dependent on Welfare" With Ananya Roy

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So well put: "Is there a world in which an original idea like “edupunk” or “MOOC’ could both become dominant and remain true to its roots? One narrative we should be particularly careful of is the narrative of co-optation. The notion that some pure Idea is insidiously taken over by Forces and corrupted to their Evil Ends is both convenient enough to be almost inevitably wrong and simple enough to contradict the epistemological tenets that undergird the very idea of connectivism."  

http://mfeldstein.com/changing-narrative/

By the way, the primary narrative in my mind at the moment is that these massive (but not persistent or retentive enough for many) open (but never open enough for some) online courses (either too course-like or not course-like enough for many) are affecting the lives of thousands and thousands of people for the better. Are they the holy grail of lifelong learning for all sentient beings? Probably not, but is there room to improve and grow and affect even more people positively? Absolutely. 
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