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WPC Sydney
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Speakers:
- Beate Jessel, President, Federal Agency for Nature Conservation
- Naomi Kingston, Head of Protected Areas Programme, UNEP
- Justin O'Brien, CEO, Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation
- Tim Badman, Director, IUCN World Heritage Programme
Elena Osipova, World Heritage Monitoring Officer, IUCN

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Speakers:
- Jane Smart, Global Director, IUCN Biodiversity Conservation Group
- Simon N. Stuart, Chair, IUCN Species Survival Commission
- Craig Hilton Taylor, IUCN Red List Unit Manager

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Speakers:
- Tim Badman, Director, IUCN World Heritage Programme
- Julia Marton-Lefevre, Director General, IUCN
- Elena Osipova, IUCN World Heritage Monitoring Officer
- Cyril Kormos, Vice-Chair, World Heritage, IUCN-WCPA

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Speakers:
- Julia Marton-Lefevre, Director General IUCN
- Achim Steiner, Executive Director UNEP
- Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, Executive Secretary CBD
- H.E. Tommy Remengesau Jr., President of Palau
- Naomi Kingston, Lead Author Protected Planet Report UNEP/WCMC

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The Closing Ceremony will mark the end of the IUCN World Parks Congress 2014 and provide an opportunity for all WPC participants to gather for the last time and celebrate the work accomplished during the congress.

The event will wrap up on the legacy of the IUCN World Parks Congress 2014 and farewell delegates from around the world with a music performance.

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This session will bring together all the outcomes from the IUCN World Parks Congress 2014, including strategies and recommendations from the streams and cross-cutting themes, the perspectives flowing from the World Leaders’ Dialogues and the partnerships and commitments of the many organisations and individuals involved. These will be summarised in the high-level Promise of Sydney. This will also be the opportunity for high-level announcements to safeguard protected areas for future generations expected from leaders around the world. And here we will celebrate our work not only over the past few days of the Congress, but the beginning of our commitment to protected areas for the decades to come.

Learn more: http://www.worldparkscongress.org/programme/plenary.html

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Dealing with controversial issues such as land-grabbing, ‘fracking,’ ‘no-go’ commitments and promises that companies can operate in the context of a ‘net positive impact,’ this second World Leaders’ Dialogue will consider the often hidden costs of our growing appetite for resources. Indeed, global consumption patterns directly impact protected areas, such as through mining for minerals and drilling for oil and gas, either within protected areas or sufficiently close to impact their integrity. China, Russia and Brazil are amongst the biggest players in the group of foreign multinationals engaged in the development of oil, gas and mineral resources operating in developing countries, alongside USA, Australia, Canada, UK and Japan. Meanwhile, the infrastructure development benefits offered by most of these countries alone, and by China in particular, far outweigh investments in the countries by the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, or other global financing instruments. Getting resource extraction, development assistance, and nature conservation right is a balancing act that could swing either way with dramatically different results.

Learn more: http://www.worldparkscongress.org/programme/wld_a_balancing_act.html

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Increasing consumption is depleting the Earth’s natural resources — the very foundation upon which human society depends — at an alarming rate. The commercial use of wild animals and plants, known as wildlife trade, is at the core of the tensions between biodiversity conservation and human development. According to TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network, illegal wildlife trade is estimated at US $10-20 billion annually, and is among the largest sources of illegal trade. This criminal activity is driving the extinction of many species, disrupting critical ecosystem functions, undermining sustainable economic development and threatening communities, livelihoods and human health. In recent years, the drivers of illegal wildlife trade have evolved significantly to include highly organized, transnational criminal networks. This World Leaders’ Dialogue will explore the causes and effects of illegal wildlife trade, and new approaches and investments to combat it. It will explore how the issue extends far beyond wildlife crime to include trade in forest, agricultural and fishing products, fuel and more.

Learn more: http://www.worldparkscongress.org/programme/wld_the_nature_of_crime.html

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For millennia, communities have understood the inherent health benefits gained from nature. However, sprawling urbanization coupled with shrinking natural spaces has left society disconnected from the natural world. Deteriorating population health and an increase in both non-communicable and contagious disease are linked to a growing phenomenon known as “nature deficit disorder.” Indeed, eco-health experts caution that human impacts on the environment lead to the spread of emerging and infectious disease including malaria, yellow fever, Lyme disease, dengue, as well as the latest Ebola outbreak. Health and wellbeing decision-makers advocate for a greater focus on preventative health care as a way of reducing the disease burden and associated costs and conservationists just as strongly advocate for the role of protected areas in providing natural solutions to a range of society’s problems including health and wellbeing. How can the positive impacts of nature for human health be accurately measured to influence a broader political agenda? This Dialogue will challenge the health and parks sectors to give the evidence and outline opportunities for managing healthy parks for healthy people.

Learn more: http://www.worldparkscongress.org/programme/wld_health_naturally.html

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The Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that 805 million people are chronically undernourished in 2012–14. At the opposite end of the spectrum, obesity is soaring. In the US, for instance, 35.7% of adults are obese and 69.2% overweight. So how is it that one-third of all food produced is thrown away, and 1 in 7 individuals go hungry? This World Leaders’ Dialogue will challenge the audience to think about how their choices, as consumers in the globalized food production and distribution system, can help reverse our current food insecurity trends and statistics, in a bid to reduce global poverty and eradicate hunger. Furthermore, food related pressures through agriculture and fishing will have the greatest influence on protected area integrity and biodiversity decline in the 21st century. This debate will delve into the study on trade-offs between (bio)-fuels, food, and fodder, and look into the impact of genetically modified organisms.

Learn more: http://www.worldparkscongress.org/programme/wld_food_for_thought.html
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