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Sathish VJ
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awesome-osx-command-line

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tutorials on web development.

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Angular in Production

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A very interesting response on why do people prefer react over angular from reddit?

"You need to have deep knowledge of both approach to understand what is great and what sucks in both angular2 and react.
But to understand react popularity, we need to go back 2 years ago.
Angular2 was between alpha and beta. The beta kept breaking stuff. RC 1 to 7 with the addition of NgModule made people using Angular2 crazy and all tutorials were outdated in a few months.
At that time, people would just use react based on popular tutorial that promoted the framework less approach. You pick the bit you need. Need a router ? Choose and use one. Need i18n ? Find a strategy. Need to connect 10 API ? There are many react ways to deliver this. And then each developer would build his nest into the react + npm ecosystem. That was definitely a honeymoon phase.
I've just watched a video of a dev using react on a daily basis. He explains during 15 minutes how he lost hope in being able to deliver efficient website/webapp. He even demonstrate it by showing us a bunch of react powered websites (wallmart for instance) that just don't work.
There has been a huge identity crisis when react devs realize having a global immutable state is not as scalable as promised. In theory it should scale beautifully. But then dive into the code, and after 6 months/1 year, there's nothing that can save the app from its unstability.
As much as I believe Angular2 is still under heavy development concerning some aspects of the framework. At least, the code has been pretty stable since 2.0.0. And important stuff like router, i18n, data management are well thought. I'm still not convinced Angular2 is more scalable than react as I've yet to see by myself a massive usage in production.
Another react promise is to say that libraries stay forever, framework just become famous then dies. It's easier to replace a few libraries one by one than change your framework to the next one.
However, I wonder how the people who make this kind of decision manage time and resource because in all the companies I've been, using a framework saved me the equivalent of 5/10 additional engineer working on some special features you need for your app.
A good example of this was 5 years ago. We outsourced an iOS app in objective C to another company. This company put 4 devs on it during 9 months. The app was 50% completed.
We hired an intern. We told him to use Appcelerator Titanium framework (at that time it would compile JS to objective C wrappers). The project was done by this intern in 6 months. 100% complete.
This is when you realize the power of frameworks.
Angular2 is the future to efficiently deliver progressive web apps.
React is only good if you can afford 10 more engineers taking care of each specific low level feature.
One more thing that changed recently. The main reason devs started using react to build web apps has been for a long time the one directional data binding flow. We can do this natively into Angular2 now :-) And we can even use store if we feel like that's the right pattern to use in some components.
So yeah, the reason you will see more react jobs offers just boils down to the fact that in 2015/2016, angular2 was absolutely not ready and react was the new most popular way to build web-apps. And now everybody, needs to maintain these apps that were built with react.
Also there's a bit of a religion thing going one with react vs any web-app framework (angular/vuejs/others)."

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Rust vs. Go
"For comparison, I switched from Rust to Go and, in the same amount of time I had spent struggling to make even a <100 LOC partial implementation work, was able to write and test the entire exterior of an IRC server - all the socket-fu and concurrency handling - leaving only the IRC-protocol state machine to be done. The lesson is extremely clear. Go is a better fit for our requirements than Rust. It’s not even close."

And the hacker news discussion: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13430108
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