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Xaime Aguiar
Lives in Morocco
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Xaime Aguiar

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HIGHLY CONTROVERSIAL

The leftwing historian and sociologist Emmanuel Todd, lobbed what he called his own “magnificently crafted Exocet missile” at the nation, with a book arguing that the street rallies were a giant lie. The rallies, he argued, were not what they claimed to be – an admirable coming-together of people from different ethnic, religious and social backgrounds standing up for tolerance – but an odious display of middle-class domination, prejudice and Islamophobia. To Todd, they represented “a sudden glimpse of totalitarianism”. These “sham” demonstrations, he claimed, were made up of a one-sided elite who wanted to spit on Islam, the religion of a weak minority in France. The working class and the children of immigrants had been notably absent, he said
After the horror of the Paris attacks, everyone agreed that the ensuing street rallies were the best of France. Then a leftwing historian called them a totalitarian sham – and his critique of ‘zombie Catholicism’ has outraged a nation
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It's ok the truth and the sun shall not be hidden for long islam
That they joke with shall come to them
In one form or the other 
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Violence, Katrina, and the Biopolitics of Disposability

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, grotesque images of bloated corpses floating in the rotting waters that flooded the streets of New Orleans circulated throughout the mainstream media. What first appeared to be a natural catastrophe soon degenerated into a social
debacle as further images revealed, days after Katrina had passed over the Gulf Coast, hundreds of thousands of poor people, mostly blacks, some Latinos, many elderly, and a few white people, packed into the New Orleans Superdome and the city’s Convention Center, stranded on rooftops, or isolated on patches of dry highway without any food, water, or places to wash, urinate, or find relief from the scorching sun. Weeks passed as the flood waters gradually receded and the military and privatized rental-armies gained control of the
city, and more images of dead bodies appeared on   the national and global media.   
  
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Sovereign power, Agamben argues, establishes itself through the production of a political order based on the exclusion of bare, human life. This it achieves through the enactment of the exception in which the law is suspended, withdrawn from the human being who is stripped of legal status and transformed in relation to sovereign power into a bare life without rights. Bare life, encompassed in the exception, inhabits the threshold of the juridico-​political community.

The sovereign exception, Agamben shows, gives rise to the juridical order. ‘[T]he rule, suspending itself, gives rise to the exception’ – that is, the juridical order, suspending its own validity, produces the exception of bare life — ‘and, maintaining itself in relation to the exception, first constitutes itself as a rule’ . Upon this (inclusive) exclusion of bare life, Agamben argues, the Western State itself is constituted.
Key Concept Giorgio Agamben's Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life, the first book of his multi-volume Homo Sacer project, urges a reconsideration of
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Caste' is today almost universally perceived as an ancient and unchanging Hindu institution preserved solely by a deep-seated religious ideology. Yet the word itself is an importation from sixteenth-century Europe. This book tracks the long history of the practices amalgamated under this label and shows their connection to changing patterns of social and political power down to the present. It frames caste as an involuted and complex form of ethnicity and explains why it persisted under non-Hindu rulers and in non-Hindu communities across South Asia.
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Teju Cole on the destruction in Palmyra

The destruction of a ruin is like the desecration of a body. It is a vengeance wreaked on the past in order to embitter the future. And how often it is that those who destroy ruins are the same ones who desecrate bodies.

Underneath modern Tadmor was Tadmor Prison. The dungeon was built for horror. The population was in the thousands. To keep the population fearful, random prisoners were dragged to death, or cut to pieces with an axe. Above stood the ancient ruins. The Syrian poet Faraj Bayrakdar, held at Tadmor Prison for five years for his communist ideas, called it “a kingdom of death and madness.”
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Drones, witches and other flying objects: the force of fantasy in US
counterterrorism

"The central premise of counterterrorism thinking is the oft-repeated formula that ‘it is not if, but when’. Hypotheticals are premised with the conditional ‘if’: ‘if A, then B’. What characterises basic counterterrorist knowledge about the next impending attack is
that it will happen. In a mindset that parallels Azande witchcraft, the counterterrorist axiom of ‘not if’ rules out mere hypotheses. The revelations are thus ‘unfulfilled hypotheticals’ that will become real with time. Counterterrorist projections are the equivalent of oracular
certainties: the horror will happen no matter what. This leads in pragmatic terms to the fatalistic attitude of disregarding actual knowledge and not taking responsibility for actual decisions: what does it really matter what we decide since it is going to happen anyway and whatever happens is out of our hands? What matters, therefore, is that we sort of divine what the course of action will be."

Read the full article.  http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/17539153.2012.659909
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Myanmar has shown tenacity for moving towards securitizing not just religion, but also gender. Recent packages of laws dubbed the protect race and religion: laws are being debated by the Myanmar parliament. These laws include mandates that require people considering religious conversion to gain state/government authorization to do so. Secondly, the package disproportionately securitizes women in the bill, which will made it illegal for Buddhist women to marry men outside of their faith as a way to maintain the purity of Buddhism. Thirdly, it will control women's bodies as it introduces legal language mandating the amount of children women are allowed to have within a span of 30 months with the possibility of coerced birth control and abortion being introduced connected to development and need to control population growth. This language of securitization reflects several  problems, one being that it is not only reflective of the Buddhist majority's fear of the minority religions within Myanmar, but also the association of the biological aspect of a woman's body as it relates to preserving the pure status of the majority religion.
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I'm sorry, but the translator does not allow me to understand.
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#yemen  

Yemenis lived in an underdeveloped country, even in comparison to their neighbors, and were deeply scarred from centuries of tribal conflict, colonial rule, and dynastic religious politics. A mixture of pan-Arabism, Marxist-Leninism, and clan revolt became the ideological manifestations of this exhaustion, leading to over a decade of turbulence.
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 This book considers the theory from the perspectives of global processes and antisystemic movements, feminist theory, and the aftermath of the colonial system. The volume addresses three myths tied to Eurocentric forms of thinking: objectivist and universalist knowledges, the decolonization of the modern world, and developmentalism. All three myths, the authors argue, conceal the continued hierarchical and unequal relations of domination and exploitation between European and Euro-American centers and non-European peripheral regions. In this volume, world-system scholars address these and related aspects of the modern/colonial capitalist world-system.
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Edward Said’s seminal text Orientalism (1978) has served as a key reference point for a wide-range of academic disciplines, linking political scientists, human geographers, and literary critics, to name but a few, to an overarching framework of postcolonial theory. Said’s reading of Western/Eastern relationships focused upon the romanticization and ‘false’ representation of Asia and the Middle East, in order to justify the West’s (post)colonial ambitions. In critiquing such assumptions, Said opened up studies of imperialism to new research questions and new methodological approaches (Schwartz 2003). His desire for a contrapuntal reading of literary texts across the East/West divide, and a greater conception of the ‘overlapping territories and intertwined histories’ of both, help to make explicit the links between the physical act of colonialism and the cultural ‘baggage’ that comes with it, formulated through the ‘geographical imagination’ of the West. 
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Indian historian Dipesh Chakrabarty is one of the leading exponents proponents of postcolonial critique. In Europe, he is most widely known for his book “Provincializing Europe”. The study investigates how the “old continent” served as a “silent referent in historical knowledge”: European political theory and imagery still dominate the global discourse, he argues, thus perpetuating Europe’s colonial and imperialist supremacy. Against the implicit European standard of modernity – of republicanism, liberalism statehood and capitalism – all non-European societies appear deficient and backward.
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Racializing Islam Before and After 9/11 : From Melting Pot to Islamophobia

This Article will situate pre-9/11 era American Muslims in relation to
various stages of immigration policies and the difficulties of Muslims and Middle Easterners faced in the process of obtaining U.S. citizenship as compared to immigrants of other European origins. Discrimination against Islam as a minority religion in white, Christian America, the international political events, and American foreign policy toward Muslim countries are major reasons for pre-9/11 resentment against Muslims and Middle Easterners in the United States. The role of the African American Muslims, and the rather difficult relationship between them and immigrant Muslims
further complicates today’s conditions. The second part of the Article will focus on legal constraints and post-9/11 civil rights abuses that were imposed upon the Muslim population and which resulted in the creation of a new type of racial category that would help to entrench such discriminatory attitudes.
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Currently
Morocco
Previously
Spain - New york - Turkey - Malta - Cairo - Argelia - US
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Arab - Islamic policy and culture. Postcolonialism.
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#Postcolonialism#MiddleEast policy. Islamic world and culture. Spivak Wannabe. A subaltern with voice?
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