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xaime aguiar
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xaime aguiar

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After reading about the level of violence that the Isma’ilis were subjected to in the earlier days of their existence – and even today – one can’t help but wonder what they did to deserve such brutal opposition. If the chronicles of the time are to be believed, the sect was positively loathed by the Muslim world. Even comparatively neutral writers, such as the Syrian Ibn al-Qalanisi, call them and their message “malicious” – for what?

Sultan Malik-Shah was one of the first to target the Nizari Ismai’ilis

The assumption that the Isma’ilis were persecuted simply because they were just another Shi’ite sect is most likely wrong. None of the medieval chroniclers shame the Twelvers – the Athna’ashariya – nearly as badly as the Seveners, the Isma’ilis. While the Athna’ashariya are treated more like the misled brother, the Isma’ilis are treated like the vile scum that is insulting their religion by pretending to be a part of it. So the abuse that the Isma’ilis generated wasn’t quite because of the old order in which the Shi’ites preferred to see the Rashidun and about the induction of the idea of Imamate into religion – it had to be something else.

The most probable cause of the hatred felt by Sunnis for Isma’ilis was the innovations introduced by them to the existing body of religion.
The roots of the Karachi bus attack on the Isma'ilis can be traced back to centuries of oppression, writes Natasha Shahid
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All world religions suffer from the same flaw: they divide humanity in its core. Both between the main religions, as internally within religions, sectarian strife and disagreements has always been a source of persecution, war and murder. Within the Western nations, the growing number of agnostic or atheistic people had led to more peaceful relations between peoples and this trend is still growing. Relations based on universal human values and rights, instead of religious rules and laws, are more suitable to build a peaceful and more united world.
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xaime aguiar

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While Sankara has been popular among youths across Africa for some time, in recent years interest in Sankara’s example and ideas has seen a resurgence, particularly in Burkina Faso itself.

Regardless of the circumstances of Sankara’s death, it is the actions and ideas of his lifetime that attract the greatest interest today. The durability of his legacy is all the more notable considering the very short time his revolutionary government was in power — from August 1983 to October 1987.
Fadel Barro, a central leader in the Senegal youth movement Y'en a Marre (Enough), is gaining a reputation among activists across Africa. In 2011 Barro and Y'en Marre initiated a mass attempt to block then-President Abdoulaye Wade from amending the constitution to favor his reelection.
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xaime aguiar

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...these testimonies, however useful to establish details, brings back the discursive trope, once again, to the Israeli bodies, rather than Palestinian ones. When one reads the main Western newspapers, it is as if reality can be accepted only if told by its perpetrators, never by those who suffer from it. In this regard, we can compare these documents to the many other truth discourses that some White people regularly produce in the form of an expression of privilege.
Photograph from the "Breaking the Silence" report The Israeli organization Breaking the Silence has just released a 237-page report of soldier's testimonies following the dreadful siege on Gaza in ...
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Jules Verne was a French author credited as one of the forebears of science fiction. He wrote Around the World in 80 Days in 1873 at the pinnacle of the British empire. Even as a Frenchman, he associated strongly with England in its colonizing capacity. The entire book, though singularly obsessed with the ways of foreign cultures and driven by an earnest wanderlust, was placed squarely in an Orientalist and colonialist framework.
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MUSLIMS SHOULD CONDEMN....MUSLIMS....OH...WHATEVER

 Some 200 religious scholars have issued a decree against suicide attacks and termed them unlawful under Islamic law.

The decree issued at a conference of ulema here on Sunday said the philosophy behind the self-styled Islamic State (IS), banned Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan, Al Qaeda, Boko Haram and other so-called jihadi outfits was misleading.

Such groups operated in an un-Islamic manner and their thinking was flawed because it was based on poor knowledge and ignorance, said the decree released to the media.
Ulema said the philosophy behind the IS, TTP, Al Qaeda, Boko Haram and other so-called jihadi outfits was misleading.
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xaime aguiar

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Say you’re a prominent US newspaper with a bureau in Beirut. You decide to run an article based on Israeli army claims that Hezbollah is wantonly militarizing villages in south Lebanon — to the extent that a single village of 4,000 people is said to contain “about 400 military sites and facilities.”

Do you: (a) Take their word for it, and allow Israeli officials to jabber on for eleven paragraphs before tacking on the disclaimer that “the Israeli claims could not be independently verified,” or (b) Send someone to take a look at one or two of the villages in question? (Or at least give Google Earth a whirl.)

If you’re today’s New York Times, the first option is the preferred one.
Say you're a prominent US newspaper with a bureau in Beirut. You decide to run an article based on Israeli army claims that Hezbollah is wantonly militarizing villages in south Lebanon — to the extent that a single village of 4000 people is said to contain “about 400 military sites and ...
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To point out that humor has thrived in Islamic lands for centuries would be painfully obvious for those who have studied the basics of world history. Yet it seems critical to do just that at this particular juncture.

Comic strips have been a staple of Arab culture since the early 20th century, and today a thriving community of Muslim cartoonists living across the world regularly comment on political and cultural events, often with daring intelligence and raw wit.
Muhammad cartoon contests ignore the many satirical voices of Muslim artists.
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A video introduces new elements into the event it records. It can turn a private grief into a public spectacle, set popular opinion at odds with expert analysis. I have seen too many such videos in the past year. I watched the fatal shooting of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was holding a toy gun in a Cleveland park. I watched a police officer put a protesting Eric Garner into a chokehold that moments later proved fatal. I watched Charly Leundeu Keunang tussle with police officers in Los Angeles before he was shot six times. And there was much I could have watched but opted not to: the ISIS beheading videos, the various other clips of deadly violence from around the world. Even so, I felt that death had come within too-easy reach, as easy as opening up a browser and pressing play.
Footage of death brings the event uncannily close, but this can be both too much and not enough.
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DEHUMANIZATION OF RACIALIZED BODIES AND WHITE PRIVILEGE

Have you heard about the Christian terrorist Robert Doggart, who was plotting a violent attack against a Muslim-American community in New York state? Probably not, because as opposed to when U.S. law enforcement officials arrest a Muslim for planning a violent assault, they didn’t send out a press release or hold a press conference publicizing Doggart’s arrest.
An ordained minister pleaded guilty to threatening to burn down a New York town full of Muslims. Where's the FBI presser and Fox News panic?
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Islam isn’t Christianity. The two faiths aren’t analogous, and it is deeply ignorant, not to mention patronising, to pretend otherwise – or to try and impose a neatly linear, Eurocentric view of history on diverse Muslim-majority countries in Asia or Africa. Each religion has its own traditions and texts; each religion’s followers have been affected by geopolitics and socio-economic processes in a myriad of ways. The theologies of Islam and Christianity, in particular, are worlds apart: the former, for instance, has never had a Catholic-style clerical class answering to a divinely appointed pope. So against whom will the “Islamic reformation” be targeted?
Those who are calling for a ‘Muslim Martin Luther’ should be careful what they wish for
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LET'S GO HIPSTER IN PAKISTAN

Karachi based musician Asadullah Qureshi sent us tracks from his favorite experimental bands in Pakistan. Enjoy the ride through the Pakistani underground with main focus on the noise and industrial scene.
Karachi based musician Asadullah Qureshi sent us tracks from his favorite experimental bands in Pakistan. Enjoy the ride through the Pakistani underground with main focus on the noise and industrial scene.
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xaime aguiar

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Archaeology
These are the ruins of Beirut: the Ottoman Beirut, the Arab Beirut, the Roman Beirut, the Hellenic Beirut, the Phoenician Beirut. The Beirut today. Beirut: the word means well. In Beirut, a well reveals layer upon layer, generation after generation, of ruins.

Experimentation
You will find the following in Beirut:

The semi-nuclear bomb.
The smart bomb.
The laser-guided bomb.
The implosion bomb.
The cluster bomb.
The fragmentation bomb.
The concussion bomb.
The phosphorus bomb.
Beirut is a city of technological experiment.
‘He was burning inside for six hours. He will not survive.’ Fawwaz Traboulsi's 'Guide to the City of Beirut': cluster bombs, ruins, the Begin amputation.
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Spain
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Morocco - New york - Turkey - Malta - Cairo - Argelia - US
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Arab - Islamic policy and culture. Postcolonialism.
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I love politics, US-Middle east culture & politics. Postcolonial nerd. Coffee addict, Edward Said wannabe.
Breaking ideological-cultural prejudices.
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