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Xaime Aguiar
Lives in Morocco
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How Europe can't shake off its Imperialism by Vijay Prashad ,an Indian historian, journalist and commentator. 
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This informal talk, followed by discussion, was given by scholar, public intellectual, and activist Vijay Prashad. Vijay is Professor of International Studies at Trinity College (USA) and Chief Editor of LeftWord Books (India). He is the author of eighteen books, most recently an edited collection, Letters To Palestine (Verso). He is a columnist for Frontline (India), BirGun (Turkey), Al-Araby al-Jadeed and a regular correspondent for The Hindu.
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UPSS IT SEEMS THAT I'M GETTING SERIOUS...

The “ego-politics of knowledge” of Western philosophy has always privilege the myth of a non-situated “Ego”. Ethnic/racial/gender/sexual epistemic location and the subject that speaks are always decoupled. By delinking Ethnic, Racial, gender, sexual epistemic location from the subject that speaks, Western philosophy and sciences are able to produce a myth about a Truthful universal knowledge that covers up, that is, conceals who is  speaking as well as the geo-political and body-political epistemic location in the structures of colonial power/knowledge from which the subject speaks.
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Y, "Luchar por un mundo donde otros mundos sean posibles", ah¡ que buena frase Zapatista.
Y, como siempre, expones muy buenos artículos. Gracias +Xaime Aguiar por esta publicación.
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Empire, Islam and the postcolonial

One of the most persistent criticisms of postcolonialism is that it promotes an antipathy to imperialism that tends to focus on the experience of European colonial empires and neglects other, non
western instances of imperial hubris. . The articulation of Islam and empire has not been subject to sustained postcolonial investigation; rather, the relationship between Muslims and imperialism has tended to be represented in terms of Muslim subjugation to European colonial rule. Postcolonial critics have largely avoided the discussion of Islamicate imperialism.
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Qur’anic Hermeneutics and Women’s Liberation By Asma Barlas

"I’ve been asked to share my work on the Qur’an, and I will do so with the intent of demonstrating a connection between a Qur’anic hermeneutics and Muslim women’s liberation. Specifically, I will argue that Muslims can and indeed must read the Qur’an as a liberatory and antipatriarchal text, and I will also show why one doesn’t have to be a woman, or a feminist, to read it as such. Admittedly, these are audacious and perhaps even counter-factual claims to make given the reputation Islam has acquired as a misogynistic religion because of how women are treated in most Muslim societies. 
 I ask if the Qur’an can be read in more than one way and I’m obliged to concede that it can."
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Yeah. Gotta pay attention, one week the Saudis are writing our foreign policy, the next Israel. 
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To pretend that Iran is an irrational actor, or plagued with an irrational or inexplicable hatred of the US, is absurd and ahistorical. As even Bill Clinton conceded, back in 1999, that Iran "has been the subject of quite a lot of abuse from various Western nations… I think sometimes it's quite important to tell people, 'Look, you have a right to be angry at something my country … did to you 50 or 60 or 100 or 150 years ago'".

Well, here are seven things that I'd argue Iranians have every right to be angry about, in relation to the US and they don't, incidentally, require us to go back "100 or 150 years".
What you need to know about Iran and the US.
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Since March, Saudi Arabia has conducted a large-scale campaign of air attacks on its neighbor with the stated purpose of driving back the Houthi rebels who have taken control of the capital Sana and large parts of the country. These aerial bombardments have not managed to reverse the gains of the rebels, but have succeeded in devastating Yemen, one of the poorest countries in the Arab world. Thousands of civilians have been killed or injured, and hundreds of thousands have been displaced, amid severe shortages of food, fuel and medical supplies.
Riyadh’s bombing is wreaking cultural destruction on a scale the Islamic State could only dream of.
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So, while we in the west focus on the default of Greece, terrorist attacks in Tunisia, the destruction of ancient artefacts in Syria by Daesh, at the same time the Saoudi Airforce is destroying our ancient heritage in Yemen.
Will the world hold the Saoudi Kingdom accountable for these acts? I think not. 
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 what is interesting to me about the figure of the migrant is that it has produced some pretty incredible collective effects that are completely outside territorial, statist, juridical, and capitalist circuits of social motion (slave and maroon societies, vagabond collectives, workers communes, and so on). If we want to think seriously about the possibilities of some kind of social organization distinct from the reactionary forces of territorial nation-​states and capitalism, then we should start with those historically invented by migrants. Cosmopolitanism is the name often taken by the reactionary forces of states toward “including” migrants. This is not the worst thing that could happen, but it also does not accurately describe the tendency of what I am calling “migrant cosmopolitanism” to create nonexpulsive social structures outside such structures of representation.
Thomas Nail is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Denver and author of The Figure of the Migrant (Stanford University Press, 2015) and
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Islamophobia cannot be reduced to the dysfunctionalism of a few hundred individuals but rather must be critiqued alongside the American legacy of settler-colonialism, genocide, and institutionalized racism. 

 Through its invocation of the superiority of secularity and liberalism, Western state discourse is able admonish Muslim political institutions for their failure to assimilate to the politics of secular modernity. The intellectual framework of Empire, therefore, allows for a hierarchical and orientalist discourse through which the colonization of Muslim minds and institutions is made legitimate.
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For the first time in human history, the color of one’s skin had a political significance. It never had a political significance before. Now there was a reason to assign a political significance to dark skin — it’s an ingenious way to brand someone as a slave. It’s a brand that they can never wash off, that they can never erase, that they can never run away from. There’s no way out. That’s the ingeniousness of using skin color as a mark of degradation, as a mark of slavery.
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As for the victims, Christians and Ahmadi Muslims only die or get killed (marnaa; halaak honaa). Shi’ahs and Ismailis get to “submit their lives to the Truth” (jaan ba-Haq), and foreign dignitaries – Muslim and non-Muslim, alike – may get that privilege too. Only the non-Ahmadi Army personnel and students at Army schools are unequivocally recognised as worthy of being designated as “martyrs” (shahiid).
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In his provocative book, White, Richard Dyer observes that the real power of American whiteness lay in its effective invisibility. While Hispanics, Asians, blacks and others are immediately recognized as raced, whites enjoy the presumption of being just “humans.” This raises their perspective above critique, since it presents it as being above the biases and limitations of any particular history, ideology or culture. This in turn allows whites to speak for “humanity” as a whole, while raced people can only speak for their particular “race” or “culture.
In his provocative book, White, Richard Dyer observes that the real power of American whiteness lay in its effective invisibility. While Hispanics, Asians, blacks and others are immediately recognized as raced, whites enjoy the presumption of being just “humans.” This raises their perspective above critique, since it presents it as being above the biases and…
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If you live in Karachi, you tend to feel the ground is constantly shifting under your feet – but the horizon doesn’t seem to move. Change is incremental, but mammoth. These days, the big news is the Rangers’ and police crackdown on political parties and crime, but if you telescope out, it appears to be part of what experts consider a larger phenomenon: the tension between formality and informality. In simpler words, the struggle between legitimate and illegitimate power.
Real estate schemes, new transport systems and the crackdown on crime are all part of the city's recent development, says Mahim Maher
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Morocco
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Spain - New york - Turkey - Malta - Cairo - Argelia - US
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Arab - Islamic policy and culture. Postcolonialism.
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#Postcolonialism#MiddleEast policy. Islamic world and culture. Spivak Wannabe. A subaltern with voice?
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