Profile

Cover photo
xaime aguiar
Lives in Spain
838,811 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
Not all violence is hot. There’s cold violence too, which takes its time and finally gets its way. Children going to school and coming home are exposed to it. Fathers and mothers listen to politicians on television calling for their extermination. Grandmothers have no expectation that even their aged bodies are safe: any young man may lay a hand on them with no consequence. The police could arrive at night and drag a family out into the street. Putting a people into deep uncertainty about the fundamentals of life, over years and decades, is a form of cold violence. Through an accumulation of laws rather than by military means, a particular misery is intensified and entrenched. This slow violence, this cold violence, no less than the other kind, ought to be looked at and understood.
Why the viciousness of modern Israeli law directed against Palestinians must be taken as seriously as the cruelties of war
4
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
The Hormozgan province in the Persian Gulf is a traditional and historical region with a diverse and unexplored population. It is framed with unique landscapes and people with profound personalities. Iranians, who still have African blood in them and continue their African heritage with their clothing style, their music, their dance and their oral traditions and rituals. 

The resulting portraits reveal new facets and unfamiliar faces, which are not typical for the common picture of Iran. They show details documenting the centuries-long history of this ethnic minority. A confrontation between the Persian culture and the, for Iran unusual, African consciousness.
The photographic series shows a side of Iran, which is unknown by even Iranians. A trip to a place which is inhabited and dominated by the descendants of slaves and traders from Africa.  The Hormozgan province in the Persian Gulf is a traditional and historical region with a diverse and unexplored population. It is framed with unique landscapes and people with profound personalities. Iranians, who still have African blood in them and...
6
2
Chris Veerabadran's profile photoApple Sana's profile photoAsian Dramas, Movies, Music, Arts, News and More's profile photo
 
Good to know. 
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
Terrorism is above all murder. Murder is strictly forbidden in the Qur’an. Qur’an 6:151 says, “and do not kill a soul that God has made sacrosanct, save lawfully.” (i.e. murder is forbidden but the death penalty imposed by the state for a crime is permitted). 5:53 says, “… whoso kills a soul, unless it be for murder or for wreaking corruption in the land, it shall be as if he had killed all mankind; and he who saves a life, it shall be as if he had given life to all mankind.”

"If the motive for terrorism is religious, it is impermissible in Islamic law. It is forbidden to attempt to impose Islam on other people. The Qur’an says, “There is no compulsion in religion. The right way has become distinct from error.”
By Juan Cole | (Informed Comment) - Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 21, has been convicted on all counts in the Boston Marathon &helip;
8
José Pedro's profile photo
 
Fine post, Xaime. 
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
Despite the historic presence of Afro-Southasian elites, and the great number of interracial marriages, cultural transfers, adaptations and assimilations that took place over centuries, the majority of Afro-Southasians today live on the social margins. They experience racial discrimination by state institutions and in the wider society. In India, the Afro-Indian population, known as Siddis, is classified as a Scheduled Tribe, and therefore benefit from wide-ranging affirmative action programmes that aim to reverse structural forms of discrimination against Dalits, Adivasis and other oppressed groups. But their presence, histories and cultures continue to be overlooked and neglected. They are viewed as ‘foreign’, and are displaced from our narratives, writings and consciousness. 
3
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
JUNOT DIAZ NAILED IT

And of course the situation in Palestine is an utter taboo in this country. Our ideas of terrorism, our ideas of Arabs, are over saturated with the most negative, weirdly perverse racist ideologies. I can't even turn on the news for five seconds without hearing the most racist shit about Arabs or Muslims. And so in that kind of atmosphere, it's just a shouting MATCH. If you say, I think the occupation of Palestine is fucked up on forty different levels, people are like, you're the devil, we're going to get YOUR tenure taken away, we're going to destroy you. You can say almost anything else. You could be like, "I eat humans," and they'll be like bien, bien. 
"If you say, I think the occupation of Palestine is fucked up on forty different levels, people are like, you're the devil, we're going to get your tenure taken away, we're going to destroy you. You can say almost anything else. You could be like, 'I eat humans,' and they'll be like bien, bien." Letters to Palestine: Writers Respond to War and Occupation, edited by Vijay Prashad, is a collection of personal essays, letters, and poems to and for ...
5
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
In his Discourse on Colonialism (1950), the French-Caribbean poet Aimé Césaire noted that after World War II, Europeans, culturally and politically devastated by war, began to renew themselves by absorbing African American culture – jazz, literature, art and so on.  In the prologue of Hisham Aidi’s brilliant and sprawling Rebel Music: Race, Empire and the New Muslim Youth Culture, he returns to Césaire’s observation, arguing that today it is Europe’s beleaguered racial minorities – its Muslim underclass, in particular – that are looking to the African American experience for uplift.
In his Discourse on Colonialism (1950), the French-Caribbean poet Aimé Césaire noted that after World War II, Europeans, culturally and politically devastated by war, began to renew themselves by a...
3
1
Apple Sana's profile photo
Add a comment...
 
In the past three decades or so, Communists, trade unionists and secular nationalist movements like pan Arabism were replaced by religious and ethnic dividers as the forces that mobilize, galvanize and divide the people in the Middle-East. We see the same results in every country with different circumstances. What are the factors that explain the rise of religious fundamentalism and the decline of the left?
4
Linda Anani's profile photoJosé Pedro's profile photo
2 comments
 
Sad to see that, in many of these countries (maybe Tunisia is the honourable exception - in a very different way, perhaps Morocco), the only choice seems to be between military dictatorship and religious extremism.
The progressive-democratic forces (including revolutionary socialism) exist but are reduced to complete powerlessness when confronted with the previously mentioned.
I said this as soon as the real nature of the so-called 'Arab Spring' became apparent; unfortunately, 3 years after, I have no reason to say any different...
And in my opinion, though with nuances - when compared to arab-majority countries - Israel is moving on a similar path: less & less Left, more & more Religious Extremism, plus the constitutional consecration of the religious nature of the State. 
Add a comment...
 
How is it possible that within five years, we have gone from an impressive revolutionary push with a broad base in Yemeni society, to Saudi Arabian fighter jets bombing large parts of the country as the Houthis consolidate power?

It is obvious why mainstream Western media outlets focus almost exclusively on rank sectarianism and proxy wars as an explanation for the conflict. Sectarianism neatly presents the issue as being one of Middle Eastern savagery. For viewers, it avoids a focus on the outcomes of Saudi-American policy, which is intentional, because of the ammunition such failures provide the American antiwar movement.
2
1
Michael Schobel's profile photo
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
Interview with Tunisia's Islamic party leader Ghannouchi

"Renowned Islamist political activist who heads Tunisia's most important Islamist political party, Ennahda, previously banned by the authoritarian regime of Zine Abidine Ben Ali. Ghannouchi, who lived in exile for many years as he was hunted by the Tunisian regime, is also the leader of a school in modern Islamic political thought that advocates democracy and pluralism."
3
Linda Anani's profile photoSohail Jannessari (‫سهیل جان‌نثاری‬‎)'s profile photo
2 comments
 
Not the main party anymore. The government is currently led by Nidaa Tounes.
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
Bangladesh is one of the few Muslim nations where prostitution is legal, and the country’s largest brothel is called Daulatdia, where more than 1,500 women and girls sell sex to thousands of men every day.

Daulatdia is infamous for drug abuse and underage prostitution, and many of its sex workers are victims of sexual slavery who were trafficked into the area and sold to a pimp or a madam.
6
1
Apple Sana's profile photo
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
Since World War II, it has become common in many representations of mass atrocity to strip away anything of the human from the scene of the crime. Hiroshima & Nagasaki would invariably be a game changer in this regard. These events set in motion the erasure of the human from representations of mass violence in particular. This is what Hannah Arendt understood to be the triumph over metaphysics, as the technological ability to conquer terrestrial space, would render us increasingly remote from ourselves and the world in which we inhabit.

But, of course, we know that every war produces its human casualties. Indeed, one of the seductions of war is embodied in the idea of the hero whose different order of sacrifice in the theatre of battle is often valorised as a “death well served”. In terms of sacrifice, the hero in fact proves to be the mimetic opposite of the visibly disposable. Both of which require a certain aestheticisation in order to validate the deathly sacrifice. 
From a political and philosophical perspective, there is still much to flesh out conceptually on the importance of theatre, especially regarding the ways we might interrogate contemporary spectacles of violence through the lens of theatricality, performativity and the audience as witness.
5
# BESTEST's profile photo
 
+xaime aguiar​ indeed, popular cultures glorified death for the vanquish while victors are deemed heroes

Built into our DNA
Add a comment...

xaime aguiar

Shared publicly  - 
 
Where does tongue-in-cheek parody end and self-exoticization begin? At what point does the Arab woman artist, stepping into the so-often imagined space of “The Harem” risk pandering to an audience that seems to have a never-ending appetite for orientalist remediations?

Lebanese photographer Rania Matar’s wonderful and insightful A Girl in Her Room series (capturing teenage girls in their most sacred space, the bedroom) includes some photographs that are clearly posed to mimic familiar odalisque imagery:
Where does tongue-in-cheek parody end and self-exoticization begin? At what point does the Arab woman artist, stepping into the so-often imagined space of "The Harem" risk pandering to an audience ...
5
Add a comment...
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Spain
Previously
Morocco - New york - Turkey - Malta - Cairo - Argelia - US
Links
Other profiles
Story
Tagline
Arab - Islamic policy and culture. Postcolonialism.
Introduction
I love politics, US-Middle east culture & politics. Postcolonial nerd. Coffee addict, Edward Said wannabe.
Breaking ideological-cultural prejudices.
Basic Information
Gender
Male