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xaime aguiar
Lives in Spain
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Zionism excavates its secular justification from the Jerusalem dirt

Archaeology as a face of settler-colonial projects, however, is not at all a new phenomenon—think of pith-helmeted British scientist-adventurers pillaging Egyptian tombs—and is hardly limited to making systems of population and territorial control in occupied Palestine look humanitarian and friendly. In exalting Jewish history above the city’s myriad layers of conquest and civilization, Jerusalem’s settler/archaeological organizations continue archaeology’s colonial legacy of shaping a history through faith in the “facts” legitimated by antiquities. The historical certainty embodied in antiquities is then projected in official state narratives, tourist sites and excursions.
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The New World Summit is an artistic and political organization dedicated to providing 'alternative parliaments' by hosting political groups that have been excluded from democracy.

EXCERPT:

There is a relation between ultranationalism and the War on Terror, which I find fascinating. On the one hand, there is this need to reinsert the idea of sovereignty, but in doing so it outsources political power to fundamentally undemocratic political infrastructures and security apparatuses so as to protect established borders and national sovereignty. The result is, of course, an absolute contradiction: the protection of the nation state contributes systemically to the erosion of civil rights within that same nation state. 
The New World Summit is an artistic and political organization dedicated to providing 'alternative parliaments' by hosting political groups that have been excluded from democracy. Founded by artist Jonas Staal in 2012, the first summit took place in Berlin in May 2012 as part of the 7th Berlin Biennale, and...
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Over the past decade, extremists have dedicated themselves to reducing the region’s complex identities to a simple Sunni vs. Shiite divide. It’s an invented history. But unfortunately in these efforts, success tends to breed success, and sectarian narratives quickly become self-fulfilling.
Why centuries of calm between Shiites and Sunnis are being ignored.
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The Gulf State monarchies have profited from the exploitation of migrant workers. But can they contain a challenge from below?

"The cheap and transitory labour power these workers provide has created the prodigious and extraordinary development boom across the region, and neighbouring countries are almost fully dependent on the labour markets of the Gulf to employ their working populations. For these reasons, the Gulf takes a central place in contemporary debates around migration and labour in the global economy."
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Muslim and other scholars hit back at this plan, calling it misguided. The peaceful Sufi/violent Salafi dichotomy, they argued, did not stand up to scrutiny; Sufism could be used as much to advocate violence as Salafism.

The work of Farzana Shaikh, a Chatham House fellow and author of "Making Sense of Pakistan", represents a complete reversal from the discourse taking place about Pakistan's problems with extremism among its liberal intelligentsia: That religious extremism has come about because of the religious right wing's stubborn certainty that being a Pakistani equates to being a conservative Sunni Muslim, and that violence is a way of eliminating from the fabric of Pakistani society those people who don't fit that definition.
Using Sufism to counter religious terrorism is not the solution to Pakistan's problems - and it's risky.
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In relatively multicultural Baghdad, a sectarian mosaic of communities tells of the divisive attitudes locals have towards Iran. You can see it just by moving between different neighbourhoods, says journalist Kholoud Ramezi. “The Shiite people like Iran and the Sunnis look toward Saudi Arabia, or even towards Isis,” Ramezi says. “If you visit Sunni areas of Baghdad you won’t see any Iranian products, like milk, water, cheese or even Iranian cars and clothes. But all of these are everywhere in the Shia areas.”
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I feel more American than Persian. Even though I speak the language and celebrate the holidays, I don't know the country. I don't know the half of my family that still lives there. And in a way, that makes me feel like I don't know myself.

But being Persian was something that I didn't bother talking about because no one seemed to know what it meant. My peers didn't know where Iran was. They'd never been exposed to the food or heard the language. They didn't know there were non-Muslim Iranians. Being Persian was something I did at home.
I journeyed halfway around the world. I found myself.
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PRETTY DRONES

For more than a decade now, the United States has been using armed drones to secretly kill suspected terrorists in Yemen. The public knows very little about these attacks. Neither the U.S. nor the Yemeni government has systematically disclosed who was killed and why, or whether civilians were among those killed.  

The findings raise serious concerns over the lawfulness of U.S. drone strikes in Yemen. It also provides credible evidence that U.S. strikes continued to kill civilians even after President Obama said in a May 2013 speech that “before any strike is taken, there must be near-certainty that no civilians will be killed or injured.” This raises serious questions about the extent to which the United States is complying with its own policy guidelines.
Courageous on-the-ground researchers give the world a look at the reality of a counterterrorism strategy that some in the U.S. government would argue is a model program.
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Desecularisation as an Instituted Process: 
National Identity and Religious Difference in Pakistan

Religious norms have significantly shaped the evolution of political and legal institutions across many Muslim societies. The public visibility of Islam has been analysed through multiple and overlapping lines of scholarly inquiry, which draw attention to the poverty of the
“secularisation theory” – the thesis that modernisation leads to a decline of religion in individual minds and social institutions. The case of Pakistan, analysed in this article, is particularly suggestive for highlighting one historical modality of the relationship between religion and politics. Through focusing on concrete instances of
exclusion of religious minorities across time, this article proposes the conceptual usefulness of desecularisation as a historically contingent, instituted process for analysing how distinct notions of politics, citizenship and national identity have become embedded in Pakistan.
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Halal in the Family is not politically correct. It frequently relies on deliberately off-colour gags – deliberately used “as a familiar access point for people to get into this world so we can talk about some more issue-based stuff”. Through humour, the show gives its viewers a sharp and witty picture of what it means for today’s generation to understand “Muslim” and “American” as two parts of the same identity.

Read the full article: http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2015/apr/21/halal-in-the-family-muslim-american-aasif-mandvi?CMP=share_btn_tw
Aasif learns that the kids’ favorite math teacher is Muslim and comes up with a plan to find out if he’s also a spy.
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LAND OF THE FREE....EXPORTING DEMOCRACY TO EVERY CORNER OF THE WORLD

The story of the first and only CIA contractor to be convicted in a torture-related case after an interrogation.
The story of the first and only CIA contractor to be convicted in a torture-related case after an interrogation.
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HOW TO WRITE ABOUT MUSLIMS

EXCERPT:

1. Do Diversify your portfolio of token Muslims. Different Muslim superheroes have different superpowers.

2. Do not assume Arabs = Muslims and Muslims = Arabs. Do not use them interchangeably.

3. Do seek out Muslims who are black and/or white and or other colors. They exist, not all are brown.

4. Do not assume bearded men or covered women are religious Muslims.

5. Do not assume clean shaven men or uncovered women are not religious Muslims.

6. Do talk to more women, who are the majority of Muslim populations.

7. Do more stories about Muslim women not involving hijab or the burqa or honor killing or FGM.

8. Do not use the words “unveil” in your title.

9. Do not assume just because a person claims to represent Muslim communities, he/she does.
Advice for the HBO host: "Do not assume Arabs = Muslims and Muslims = Arabs. Do not use them interchangeably."
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Spain
Previously
Morocco - New york - Turkey - Malta - Cairo - Argelia - US
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Tagline
Arab - Islamic policy and culture. Postcolonialism.
Introduction
I love politics, US-Middle east culture & politics. Postcolonial nerd. Coffee addict, Edward Said wannabe.
Breaking ideological-cultural prejudices.
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