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Xaime Aguiar
Lives in Morocco
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Xaime Aguiar

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Despite having been discredited, the same tables of anthropometric measurement that were used for categorizing races in the 19th century are still used in forensic anthropology, plastic surgery, and facial recognition – the latter of which informs the algorithms that allow for facial parameterization in FDP. Forensic DNA Phenotyping is simply the latest in a long succession of identity-inscribing technologies which claim to use science to classify types of bodies into socially constructed categories like gender and race.
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We cannot stop a war we did not start
Fiction from #Afghanistan 

"Seven years ago, on a Friday afternoon, my village had gathered in the main cemetery, at the foot of the mountains. It was the second year of the American occupation. Gathered were the grey beards, young men and small boys, but no women. I was 25 years old. We were burying Aka Jaan, a tribal leader, who had died the night before. Some men were digging the grave, and the rest of us sat around quietly. The elders leaned on their walking sticks, sighing and looking at each other anxiously. They knew that soon they would follow Aka Jaan. Young boys carried buckets of water for the diggers. The cold black tombstone, loaded onto the donkey cart, shone in the sunlight."
FICTION: The mountains became my patience stone, and I hoped they could hold my secrets and sins.
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What is termed globalization is the culmination of a process that began with the constitution of America and colonial/modern Eurocentered capitalism as a new global power. One of the fundamental axes of this model of power is the social classification of the world’s population around the idea of race, a mental construction that expresses the basic experience of colonial domination and pervades the more important dimensions of global power, including its specific rationality: Eurocentrism. The racial axis has a colonial origin and character, but it has proven to be more durable and stable than the colonialism in whose matrix it was established. Therefore, the model of power that is globally hegemonic today presupposes an element of coloniality. In what follows, my primary aim is to open up some of the theoretically necessary questions about the implications of coloniality of power regarding the history of Latin America.
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+Ángela Montesdeoca thanks!! glad that you liked it! y muchas gracias y feliz semana
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“How do we stop young Muslims becoming radicalised?” is the question we now continually ask. But it’s a deeply misleading question because it points us in the wrong direction. Why? Because it contains a hidden assumption that it is radical ideas, specifically Islamic theological ideas, that are the root cause of turning a young lad from West Yorkshire into an Isis suicide bomber in Iraq. According to the radicalization hypothesis, it’s conservative Islam and the dangerous ideas contained in the Qur’an that motivate murderous behaviour.
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"For me there are a few other pieces around border imperialism. One is the connection to racism and the ways in which immigration increasingly is not seen as racially coded, it’s seen as more of a legal debate, whether you’re legal or illegal, whether you’re here, if you’re following the proper channels. And this is particularly the debate in Europe as well and Australia and Canada and the United States right now, the difference - the discourse that differentiates between the so-called ‘legal migrant’ and the ‘bogus migrant’. This is really coded, even though it’s not explicitly so around race, because even though we don’t explicitly talk about anti-Chinese, anti-Japanese, anti-South Asian migration in Canada when we’re talking about migration we are talking about race, and one of the ways in which we see this is the fact that communities of colour are constantly seen as migrants despite their legal status."
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How Europe can't shake off its Imperialism by Vijay Prashad ,an Indian historian, journalist and commentator. 
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This informal talk, followed by discussion, was given by scholar, public intellectual, and activist Vijay Prashad. Vijay is Professor of International Studies at Trinity College (USA) and Chief Editor of LeftWord Books (India). He is the author of eighteen books, most recently an edited collection, Letters To Palestine (Verso). He is a columnist for Frontline (India), BirGun (Turkey), Al-Araby al-Jadeed and a regular correspondent for The Hindu.
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Black folk are globally committed to notions of justice, due to our intimate relationships with injustice. Our emotionality must be part of that justice project. Emotional justice is crucial to our collective and individual healing. How is our emotionality not profoundly fucked up when every part of our history, the pain inflicted on us still requires that you centralize whiteness? How do we heal when there is no respite from the violence? Who do we become when white supremacy’s manufactured fear matters more than our bruised, battered, and bloodied black bodies?
My mama is 79. Wednesday night is her bible study. Just like Ms. Ethel Lee Lance, mama has her circle of church going elders—black women in their 60s, 70s, and 80s for whom church is home. Maybe even safer than home. Their pain was safe in the hands of this particular Jesus. Unshed tears from the Middle Passage were here. Friendships decades deep were here. Sanctuary was here. Comfort, too. Prayers unheard by a black community too often deaf to t...
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Throughout its long and complicated history, Iran has been home to a wide range of nations, ethnicities, and adherents of various religions, at times living in harmony and at other times, cohabiting in tension. When recounting the story of Iran, the nationalist currents have historically centered certain religio-ethnic narratives of true Iranian-ness, pushing out of collective memory the stories of more marginalized inhabitants and alternatively incorporating or excluding new immigrants from the constructed ideal of the nation. One of the oldest of these communities has been Iran’s Zoroastrian population, estimated at about 25,279 according to official census results in 2012. Before the introduction of Islam to Iran in the 7th century, Zoroastrians constituted approximately 70-80% of Iran’s population, but over time many either converted to Islam or left for nearby India and became members of the Parsi community, the cultural traditions of which survive to this day.

Despite the declined population, Zoroastrian structures and symbols dot Iran’s landscape and have become an important part of cultural and national identity for most Iranians and a fascinating window into Iran’s pre-Islamic history for academics and tourists alike.
Reciting the history-mythology surrounding the figure of Shahrbanu and her role in the dissemination of Islam to Iranians is a significant method of (re)producing a seamless continuity between the ...
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"But while the events of the last few years did not prompt the decision to come back, they do make me relieved that the decision had already been made. It is why I have not once had second thoughts. If I had to pick a summer to leave, this would be the one. Another season of black parents grieving, police chiefs explaining and clueless anchors opining. Another season when America has to be reminded that black lives matter because black deaths at the hands of the state have been accepted as routine for so long. A summer ripe for rage."
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 *An article by Reza Aslam*

"My father, a devout atheist who never trusted anything said by a man wearing a turban, went to his grave waiting for the United States to overthrow the Iranian government so he could go back home. When I asked him if he would have been willing to see Tehran bombed, he told me that Iranians are prisoners in their own country. Sometimes a prison break requires bombs."

"That view is most definitely not shared by the younger generation of Iranian-Americans — those born here or who, like me, came as children. Many of us feel far removed from the political and religious turmoil of the Iranian revolution and so, for the most part, have replaced our parents’ anger and bitterness with a sense of longing and fascination about Iran."
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FEMINIST WHILE AFRICAN

Women and feminist­-allied men are continuously positively discussing policy and legislative issues affecting women as well as the labour of living with everyday sexism. The growth of Nollywood and African television and cinema has provided an important trove of cultural production which remains relatively untouched by African feminist discourse. Recent novels like the Folio Prize nominated, Dust,​ by Caine Prize winner, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor (Kenya), Kintu​ ​, by Commonwealth Prize winner, Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi (Uganda), Americanah​ by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, are written with fierce female voices and imagine new ways of African women inhabiting the modern world. The Feminist​ Africa  journal, founded by Amina Mama, remains a cornerstone in African feminist organizing and thinking.
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 what is interesting to me about the figure of the migrant is that it has produced some pretty incredible collective effects that are completely outside territorial, statist, juridical, and capitalist circuits of social motion (slave and maroon societies, vagabond collectives, workers communes, and so on). If we want to think seriously about the possibilities of some kind of social organization distinct from the reactionary forces of territorial nation-​states and capitalism, then we should start with those historically invented by migrants. Cosmopolitanism is the name often taken by the reactionary forces of states toward “including” migrants. This is not the worst thing that could happen, but it also does not accurately describe the tendency of what I am calling “migrant cosmopolitanism” to create nonexpulsive social structures outside such structures of representation.
Thomas Nail is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Denver and author of The Figure of the Migrant (Stanford University Press, 2015) and
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Morocco
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Spain - New york - Turkey - Malta - Cairo - Argelia - US
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Arab - Islamic policy and culture. Postcolonialism.
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#Postcolonialism#MiddleEast policy. Islamic world and culture. Spivak Wannabe. A subaltern with voice?
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