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Dran Fren
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<"Streaks” — long chains of snaps and the snaps your friends send in response — are seen as a measure of popularity. “The more streaks you have, the cooler you are.”>
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<A proposal to reform EU copyright was presented by Günther Oettinger shortly before leaving his post as Digital Commissioner. The proposal falls far short of the stated goal of “breaking down national silos in copyright” and updating the rules to the digital age.
The proposals seek to limit how freely we can share links and upload media to benefit the business models of media conglomerates: “Censorship machines” for internet platforms, an extra copyright for news sites and the very limited scope of a proposed text and data mining exception would curtail our ability to actively participate online.>

https://juliareda.eu/eu-copyright-reform/
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"Article 13: Use of protected content by information society service providers storing and giving access to large amounts of works and other subject-matter uploaded by their users.

What does this mean?

This proposal throws the idea of balanced copyright out the window, as it would make all open platforms liable for the actions of their users, enforce a particular type of business model (e.g. licenses), and impose mandatory filters, all with no safeguards to preserve copyright exceptions, or the rights of users.

These measures would in practice require monitoring and filtering of everything that European citizens upload to content-sharing services from social media sites (like Twitter and Facebook), outlets for creative expression (like YouTube, DeviantArt, SoundCloud, and Tumblr), to informational sites (like Wikipedia and the Internet Archives), to open source software repositories (like GitHub). It would be the responsibility of these services to play judge, jury, and executioner for copyright enforcement — businesses large and small could be held liable for the content their users access and share."

https://changecopyright.org/en-US
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How to attack texts intuitively

When you are confronted with a text/theory you are not familiar with, the main method in understanding it, is identifying what and where its key element (bottomline/information) is presented and/or buried.
In order to do that first you have to identify anything, which is of little relevance or merely gibberish/hand-waving, so you can skip that. Approximately 80% of any text are made up of that stuff, give or take. Many authors hide behind a facade, also they have to somehow fill the pages.

Identify any key words, notions or references in a text, to understand its architecture and inner logic. If you have any background and encyclopedic knowledge, obviously that helps.

Over time you can learn better to intuitively spot the heart of a text - very often these are just one or two sentences, where the author actually lays out, what he is up to and what his or her main motivation and key idea/innovation is.

Also attend to what imagery authors use, because that's a way to subconsciously fingerpaint and/or invoke other authors and ideas.
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Nice background piece on the shenanigans of Cambridge Analytica.
It doesn't seem really clear if they do voodoo marketing or market voodoo.

Also here's a speculative angle that's not in the story: given what we know about the shady practices, the mixed outcome and mishaps they had with the Cruz primary campaign might not have been completely unintentional!? After all Bannon was already on board there and they were reaching out to the Trump campaign. (Though they seem to have produced further mess-ups all along, so it's hard to tell).
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"A top fundraiser for President Donald Trump received millions of dollars from a political adviser to the United Arab Emirates last April, just weeks before he began handing out a series of large political donations to U.S. lawmakers considering legislation targeting Qatar, the UAE’s chief rival in the Persian Gulf, an Associated Press investigation has found."
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<While approximately half of the server technologies and software infrastructure I found represent commonplace software packages and application kits such as Wordpress, Drupal, jQuery, and font/javascript APIs, it was alarming to find highly sophisticated tracking technologies, advanced programmatic ad delivery, AI content optimization, cross-platform personalization, and SDK social integration as part of the technology woven into these unsophisticated “fake news” sites.>

via +Edward Morbius
https://medium.com/tow-center/who-hacked-the-election-43d4019f705f
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"The public image of Silicon Valley’s tech giants is all colourful bicycles, ping-pong tables, beanbags and free food, but behind the cartoonish facade is a ruthless code of secrecy. They rely on a combination of Kool-Aid, digital and physical surveillance, legal threats and restricted stock units to prevent and detect intellectual property theft and other criminal activity. However, those same tools are also used to catch employees and contractors who talk publicly, even if it’s about their working conditions, misconduct or cultural challenges within the company."

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/mar/16/silicon-valley-internal-work-spying-surveillance-leakers
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At the moment we don't even have a global financial architecture, which would prevent the race-to-the-bottom regarding taxation and all sorts of creative tax evasion (except some attempts on G20 level, and the sorts of journalistic disclosures like the Panama papers etc.). IMHO as long as there are no coherent solutions for these problems, the current updrift of capital to the top 10% (incl. corporate actors) won't be stalled, and interested parties from this group will use any means at hand scientific or not. Now CS have proved to be extremely helpful for such objectives, and the trend we see, is that these are becoming more and more pervasive and ubiquitous. The big players in this (technological) field expand their network capacities and have very little internal circuit breakers (or significant interest) which would prevent cases like that of Cambridge Analytica etc.
I'm afraid, there might be a point in the (not too far) future, where the dynamic and structures have become so strong, it won't be possible to dial it back for a long time...
“computer science is a field which hasn't yet encountered consequences”

#l
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"An undercover investigation by Channel 4 News reveals how Cambridge Analytica secretly campaigns in elections across the world. Bosses were filmed talking about using bribes, ex-spies, fake IDs and sex workers."

https://www.channel4.com/news/cambridge-analytica-revealed-trumps-election-consultants-filmed-saying-they-use-bribes-and-sex-workers-to-entrap-politicians-investigation

here is also the Guardian reporting on this stunt:
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/mar/19/cambridge-analytica-execs-boast-dirty-tricks-honey-traps-elections
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