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Pamela Takeshige
47 years in Japan. I love beading & polymer clay.
47 years in Japan. I love beading & polymer clay.
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I'd like to make this.
Chicken Yassa, African Lemon Chicken:

I'm taking my family to a new food safari this weekend. Are you coming along ?!

We are enjoying a delicious, quick and easy recipe from Senegal . Chicken marinated in a tangy and spicy sauce and stewed with lots of onions .

So few ingredients and a powerhouse of flavours.
Believe me you don't want to miss this adventure!

Serve over couscous or plain rice.

Recipe at
http://www.foodaholic.biz/chicken-yassa-african-lemon-chicken/

#chickenrecipes
#quickneasyrecipes
#weekend
#marianasirrecipes
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Pamela Takeshige commented on a post on Blogger.
I appreciate your advice to hand grind the spices. It makes sense!! Plus, I best it smells good to do by hand too!

Here is some more information on Shah Jeera/Black Cumin:
http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/engl/Buni_per.html

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This looks wonderful.
HYDERABADI DUM KA MURGH / Hyderabad Style Slow Steam Cooked Chicken Curry

Recipe Link ~ http://mytrystwithfoodandtravel.blogspot.ae/2017/06/hyderabadi-dum-ka-murgh-recipe.html

The best part about this dish is that it doesn't need you around when it's slow cooking on a gentle fire, to stir or mix, add ingredients etc. Once you have marinated the chicken in the required list of ingredients and covered the utensil, you only need to come back to put the pot or pan on the fire and then come back to turn off the flame after 30 ~ 45 minutes. Though practically no sauteing or stirring is required you will surely be surprised by the superlative nature of this chicken curry. Truly a chicken curry for the soul.
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I have no idea how to do a tea tasting, but this will give some hints.

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Pamela Takeshige commented on a post on Blogger.
I understand what you are saying and I am not criticizing you. Just offering an idea:
If you wanted to, you can limit who can see your blog just to you, for example. That is possible in the settings of BLOGSPOT. Or you can limit the viewers to a list of people. Or as you have it now, the whole world. I know what you mean about not being able to find things again. And wanting to have quick assured access to material you want to see again. Take a look at your settings and see what you can do.

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Pamela Takeshige commented on a post on Blogger.

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Pamela Takeshige commented on a post on Blogger.
About RADHUNI

I copied this from Gernot Katzers web site about spices. But, please do go visit this amazing site about all the spices of the world. He includes many Hindi and other Indian language names.
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In the Indian union states West Bengal, Orissa and Sikkim, as well as in Bangladesh and Southern Nepal, a spice mixture made from five spices is very popular: Panch phoran [পাঁচ ফোরন or পাঁচ ফোড়ন], better known under its name in Hindi panch phoron [पांच फोरन]. It is used both for meats and vegetables. The composition mostly given in the literature is whole nigella, fenugreek, cumin, black mustard seeds and fennel at equal parts; but this is not the authentic recipe. In Bengal, cooks use a spice called radhuni [রাধুনি] for that mixture, which is replaced by black mustard seeds elsewhere, as radhuni is hardly available outside Bengal, even in the rest of India. Radhuni is the dried fruits of Trachyspermum roxburghianum (syn. Carum roxburghianum), a relative of ajwain and caraway; its flavour is, however, more akin to the aroma celery seeds which I recommend as a substitute; it does, however, also exhibit a pungency comparable to that of ajwain.
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http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/engl/Nige_sat.html

Spice index in English
http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/engl/spice_small.html

Spice index in Hindi
http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/engl/spice_indic.html

This is just about the most complete and correct site about spices of the world. Lost of photos and information about spices.


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Pamela Takeshige commented on a post on Blogger.
This looks amazing, Piyali San. I want to make this version and the fish version, too. Some day, I will be visiting Bengal to try all your wonderful dishes in your country!!. So yummy sounding and looking.

I have a question. I can not get banana leaves here in Japan. Can I use parchment paper instead? 

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Pamela Takeshige commented on a post on Blogger.
I do love your recipes and cooking, Piyali! This looks so simple and fun. Your step by step photos are the key for me. I can see how things should look before and after! And all your explanations are so clear for these wonderful home cooked meals that are so full of your family love.

I have two comments if I may:

#1
In the category at the start of the recipe, under "cuisine" you have "Indian". It would be ever better if you could include the part of India where the recipe comes from as the styles of cooking in India are so distinctive. Bengal cooking is very different from Punjabi or Gujurati, etc., I think. For us non-Indians, it would be very helpful.

#2
Spice names. Are you using western Bay laural leaves or are they TEJ PAT BAY leaves?? I have a feeling you are using tej pat bay leaves which are a different kind of plant completely from bay laural leaves, I believe. I was just wondering. Sometimes spice names are confusing.

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Pamela Takeshige commented on a post on Blogger.
Piyali:: this looks amazing. I wish i could try this! Your photos are wonderful and the instructions are so clear.
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