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Deborah Netburn
Works at Los Angeles Times
Attended Wesleyan University
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The annual Lyrid meteor shower peaks tonight, and you can watch it live, right here.
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The good news is that saving water does not have to be difficult or expensive -- and even if you are renting, you can start right now.

What follows is a short list of the most effective actions U.S. households can take to curb indoor water use. The list was published last summer in the journal Environment: Science and Policy for Sustainable Development. 
You are freaking out about this drought, and you want to do something, anything, to conserve water. ;But where to start?
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"No mission before Rosetta was able to come close enough to a comet nucleus to detect its magnetic field unambiguously," said Christopher Russel a scientist at UCLA and coauthor of the paper. "Landing on the surface of a comet was needed to get close enough to the magnetic material in the comet."
The first scientific paper to include observations from the surface of a speeding comet has been released, marking a new era in cometary science.
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Nobody is 100% sure how the moon was created, but the giant-impact model is the most widely accepted. It suggests that 4.5 billion years ago a proto-planet about the size of Mars collided with Earth during the turbulent formation of our solar system.
It's a lunar mystery that has lingered for decades: If the moon is made of material from another planetary body that crashed into Earth, why ;is its chemical fingerprint so similar to that of our planet?
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+Colin Trudel Enjoy your petrified wood a.k.a "moon rocks". Can't believe they gave it to the Queen of England. NASA literally trolled the crown! They have big balls I can assure you.  
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Researchers who tested 102 samples of breast milk purchased from popular milk-sharing websites found that one in 10 contained substantial amounts of cow DNA.

Further tests ruled out the possibility that the cow DNA was the result of minor or incidental contamination and suggested that the tainted breast milk had probably been mixed with  cow-milk-based baby formula.
Is breast milk always best for babies? Not when it's purchased over the Internet, according to a new study.
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I can't help it!!! I want some!
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"A lot of times when we think of corals we think of warm vacation localities remote from where we live. It is amazing to me that we have these coral ecosystems right in our backyard."
Five hundred feet beneath the ocean's surface, a robotic submarine is bumping into a grove of bone-white coral in the waters off the Channel Islands.
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Have her in circles
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The ability of a hyper-sensitive clock to determine small differences in altitude is based on Einstein's prediction that the farther one gets from the center of an attractor (like Earth), the faster time moves. 
Scientists have created an atomic clock that is so precise that it ;can detect tiny ;changes in the speed of its ticks depending on whether it is 2 centimeters closer or farther ;from the center of Earth. ;
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Other way, Mass speeds the electrons. the twins, one who stayed on earth became older than the one who traveled.  yeah confusing. 

At the quantum level time at the 10th floor is slower than the 9th floor. 
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The mission has gone according to plan so far, but NASA officials said hazards could emerge as the spacecraft plunges deeper into the Pluto system.

"This is no simple flyby," Jim Green, director of planetary science at NASA said during a panel discussion in Washington "We are flying into the unknown."
After a journey of 9.5 years across 3 billion miles of space, NASA 's New Horizons spacecraft is about three months away from its closest approach to the dwarf planet Pluto.
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It turns out that the GPS sensors built into most smartphones are sensitive enough to detect the earliest signs of quakes that are magnitude 7 and stronger, new research shows. The data they collect could be used to give nearby communities a few seconds’ notice that seismic waves are headed their way.

“The GPS on a smartphone is shockingly good,” said study leader Sarah Minson, a geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Pasadena. “If you take your phone and move it six inches to the right, it knows with surprising accuracy that it moved six inches to the right — and that is exactly what we want to know when studying earthquakes.”
Your smartphone is a camera, a calculator, a flashlight and a pedometer. Scientists believe it could be part of an earthquake early-warning system too.
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"I believe we are going to have strong indications of life beyond Earth in the next decade and definitive evidence in the next 10 to 20 years," Ellen Stofan, chief scientist for NASA, said at a public panel Tuesday in Washington.

"We know where to look, we know how to look, and in most cases we have the technology," she said.

Jeffery Newmark, interim director of heliophysics at the agency put it this way: "It's definitely not an if, it's a when." 
Are we alone in the universe? Top NASA scientists say the answer is almost certainly “no.”
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You mean fallen angles? OK p Grimm think about this.? What if? Let's not call them alieans let's look at it totally different. What if? Space is the womb.? For science? Picture the planet earth as a organism inside the body. Picture us a good organism with good germs being found by a bad germ. ?
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Look sharp, sky watchers: You can catch the shortest total lunar eclipse of the century this weekend - if you keep your eye on the clock.

The moment of totality, when the entire moon is bathed in the Earth's shadow, will begin at 4:58 a.m. Pacific time Saturday and last for just under five minutes.

That's seriously short. For some lunar eclipses, totality can last for more than an hour.
Look sharp, sky watchers: You can catch the shortest total lunar eclipse of the century this weekend - if you keep your eye on the clock.
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On Tuesday afternoon, just about lunch time, a "flying saucer" was undergoing a spin test in a clean room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

The saucer is technically a 15-foot wide, 7,000-pound aerodynamic test vehicle. It is designed to help engineers try out new technologies for landing spacecraft, and someday people, on Mars.

The vehicle does bear a passing resemblance to a flying saucer, but if you are hungry, it also looks like a giant pie.
On Tuesday afternoon, just about lunch time, a "flying saucer" was undergoing ;a ;spin test ;in a clean room at NASA 's Jet Propulsion Laboratory .
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Obohma
Can't talk about it! Yet.
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Have her in circles
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Work
Occupation
Science Reporter
Employment
  • Los Angeles Times
    Science Reporter, 2013 - present
  • Los Angeles Times
    Tech Reporter, 2011 - 2013
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Female
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Science writer!
Introduction
Deborah Netburn is a science reporter at the Los Angeles Times. 
Education
  • Wesleyan University
    Religion, 1995 - 1999