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Journals Program of the American Psychological Association
Journals Program of the American Psychological Association

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TOMORROW, February 24, from 12-1 p.m. EST, join APA Division 49 - Society of Group Psychology and Group... for a free webinar on Estimation and Application of the Latent Group Model. This is the first of six webinars featuring authors from the special issue of Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice focusing on Statistical Methods in Group Psychology and Group #Psychotherapy. For more information and to sign up for free, see: http://on.apa.org/2lKP4sw.
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A significant number of patients with unexplained chest pain (UCP) have #panic disorder (PD), and most individuals with PD report poor sleep, including insomnia and nocturnal panic attacks (NPA). The objective of the study by Belleville et al. (2015) was to examine the impact of treatment for PD on sleep problems and to assess the influence of pretreatment #insomnia on posttreatment persistence of PD diagnosis and pain severity. To read this open access article, see: http://on.apa.org/2lyJNB3.
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Ladd, Ettekal, and Kochenderfer-Ladd (Online First) sought to map prevalence, normative trends, and patterns of continuity or change in school-based peer #victimization throughout formal schooling (i.e., Grades K–12), and determine whether specific victimization patterns were associated with children’s academic performance. The researchers studied a sample of 383 children from kindergarten through Grade 12, and repeatedly administered measures of peer victimization, school engagement, academic self-perceptions during this time. The researchers identified 5 trajectory subtypes, capturing differences in victimization frequency and continuity. Consistent with a chronic stress hypothesis, high-chronic victimization consistently was related to lower—and often prolonged—disparities in school engagement, academic self-perceptions, and #academic achievement. For other victimization subtypes, movement into victimization (i.e., moderate-emerging) was associated with lower or declining scores on academic indicators, and movement out of victimization (i.e., early victims) with higher or increasing scores on these indicators (i.e., “recovery”). Findings provide a more complete account of the overall prevalence, stability, and developmental course of school-based peer victimization than has been reported to date. For more information, see: http://on.apa.org/2lfx0Vb.
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Over the last 20 years, there has been dramatic growth in research funding, widespread media coverage, and increased public awareness on the topic of sport #concussion. Although the knowledge base has greatly expanded, there is still much that is unknown or controversial about the long-term effects of sports-related head injury. Because of the high stakes of mismanaging these injuries, professional sports organizations, federal/state government, and various health-related disciplines have responded with efforts to educate the public and improve treatment and management of this injury. The field of #psychology has also made significant contributions to research on sports concussions, resulting in the development of new assessment and treatment protocols. The featured article by Guay et al. (2016) summarizes the latest research findings on sport concussion, highlights areas that require more research before consensus can be reached, and discusses the ways that multiple disciplines within psychology can continue to play a critical role in enhancing patient care. For more information, see: http://on.apa.org/2lytYue.
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Recollection is a controlled process of memory retrieval, as opposed to familiarity, which is automatic. An estimate of recollection, derived from a 10-min computer-based memory task, outperformed a majority of other behavioral measures in correctly discriminating between cognitively normal individuals from those with the earliest detectable stage of #dementia (Millar, et al., Online First). Recollection was also uniquely related to the accumulation of #Alzheimer’s disease pathology, that is, amyloid plaques and neurodegeneration, in presymptomatic, cognitively normal individuals. For more information on this study, see: http://on.apa.org/2m3OZNr.
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Previous studies have shown an association between affect in anticipation of and in response to aerobic exercise and subsequent exercise #motivation and behavior. Kwan, Stevens, and Bryan (Online First) sought to test the effects of an expectation-based manipulation of affective responses to exercise on anticipated, experienced, and remembered affect and commitment to a 7-day exercise prescription. The manipulation influenced anticipated and experienced affective responses, but not behavior. Participants generally expected exercise to be less pleasant and more fatiguing that it actually was. Anticipated, experienced, and remembered affect were associated with intentions to #exercise. Intentions and remembered affect were both directly associated with exercise behavior. In conclusion, moderate-to-vigorous exercise can be more pleasant than people expect it to be. For more information, see: http://on.apa.org/2lyJAOh.
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A study by Steers et al. (2016) looked at the association between relationship awareness on Facebook (i.e., displaying a “partnered” relationship status, posting “partnered” status updates, and uploading pictures of oneself with a partner) with relationship quality and authenticity. The findings of the study suggest that those high in #relationship authenticity may be more intrinsically motivated to express themselves as part of a couple on Facebook, which in turn may affect their global relationship functioning.

According to the authors, posting about one’s relationship on Facebook may be positively related to the quality of the relationship because it symbolizes making a public commitment to the relationship. In making a public commitment to the relationship, an individual is highlighting to themselves and to others that the relationship is an integral part of his or her self. Because previous literature has demonstrated that making a public commitment is related to a stronger sense of identity, highly authentic individuals might be intrinsically motivated to post such publicly, self-presented attitudes about their relationship online, which in turn, may solidify their commitment to the relationship and predicts higher relationship quality. By contrast, individuals who post information about their relationship on Facebook to satisfy their partners may not receive the same benefit. To read this freely available article, see: http://on.apa.org/2ktOyeb.
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A study by Lannin, Vogel, and Heath (Online First) indicates that reflecting on personal values via an online exercise is associated with positive beliefs about seeking psychological help among those experiencing a mental health concern. This type of online exercise could be particularly useful as it is briefer than existing interventions and could be applied in online settings where many people first encounter information about mental health and treatment. For more information about the study, see: http://on.apa.org/2kUbEib.
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A recent study by Foster, Elischberger, and Hill (Online First) examined the interplay of several key social and personal predictors of mental illness prejudice: socioeconomic status (SES), empathy, mental illness knowledge, and personal acquaintance with the mentally ill. Analyses showed that higher subjective (although not objective) SES, lower levels of empathy, and lower levels of knowledge about mental illness all predicted increased prejudice against people suffering from clinical depression and nondescript mental illness—although not against people suffering from schizophrenia. Path analyses showed evidence for a mediating role of knowledge and empathy in the link between SES and prejudice. The authors discuss implications of these findings for ways to diffuse mental illness #prejudice. For more information, see: http://on.apa.org/2lkTtz4.
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Understanding how the public perceives uncertainty in scientific research is fundamental for effective communication about research and its inevitable uncertainty. Previous work found that scientific evidence differentially influenced beliefs from individuals with different political ideologies. Evidence that threatens an individual’s political ideology is perceived as more uncertain than nonthreatening evidence. In their article, Broomell and Kane (2017) present three studies examining perceptions of #scientific uncertainty more broadly by including sciences that are not politically polarizing. The three studies show that perceptions of scientific uncertainty associated with entire research fields are valid predictors of abstract perceptions of scientific quality, benefit, and allocation of funding. Yet, they do not inform judgments about individual results. Therefore, polarization in the acceptance of specific results is not likely due to individual differences in perceived scientific uncertainty. Further, the direction of influence potentially could be reversed, such that perceived quality of scientific results could be used to influence perceptions about scientific research fields. For more information, see: http://on.apa.org/2ktFxFQ.
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