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In their meta-analysis, Slagt et al. (2016) examine whether children vary in sensitivity to #parenting depending on their temperament, and if so, which model can best be used to describe this sensitivity pattern. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2dm699B.
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Learning disability (LD) identification has long been controversial and has undergone substantive reform. A study by Maki, Burns, and Sullivan (Online First) examined the consistency of school psychologists’ LD identification decisions across three identification methods and across student evaluation data conclusiveness levels. Data were collected from 376 practicing school psychologists from 22 states. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 9 conditions and used 1 type of identification method and examined 1 type of student evaluation data to determine if a student should be identified with LD. Results showed that overall identification consistency was somewhat low. There were no differences in identification consistency across identification methods, but there were differences in identification consistency across conclusiveness levels of student evaluation data. The article also discusses the implications for practice, training, and research, including the need of school psychologists to consider psychometric issues in LD identification as well as the need to further research the impact of student data conclusiveness in LD identification. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2cHTBGL.
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Health care providers practicing in rural settings face unique challenges, including a lack of behavioral health providers and training specific to the provision of rural mental health care for older adults. Even with the formation of the National Rural Health Advisory Committee in 1987, rural older adults still encounter barriers to adequate behavioral health services. In rural health care, this can be described as the “three-part problem”: accessibility, acceptability, and availability (Smalley et al., 2010). In their article, Ogbeide, Stermensky II, and Rolin (2016) provide an overview of the current state of rural behavioral health care in the United States, the importance of the Triple Aim initiative, and applying flexibility with the integration of behavioral health services into rural primary care settings. In addition, the authors discuss future directions addressing the training of behavioral health providers. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2cybB5R.
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In their article, published in 2013, Haugen et al. describe an integrative #psychotherapy for first responders to the 9/11 attacks, including those who continue to be psychologically impacted by these events, most of whom meet criteria for a diagnosis of #posttraumatic stress disorder. Three core techniques used in this treatment are described: (a) an emphasis on meaning making, particularly regarding the traumatic event; (b) focus on the most affect-laden components of the traumatic exposure; and (c) identifying and challenging the implicit strategies used by individuals to avoid discussion of components of their traumatic memories and the attendant negative affect. For each intervention, a theoretical rationale and the presumed mechanism of operation are presented. The authors discuss the clinical and research implications of this intervention. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2cg4OOW.
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Risk beliefs are central to most theories of health behavior, yet many unanswered questions remain about an increasingly studied risk construct, anticipated regret. In their article, Brewer, DeFrank, and Gilkey (Online First) sought to better understand anticipated regret’s role in motivating #health behaviors. From their analyses, the researchers found that anticipated regret was associated with both intentions and health behavior. Greater anticipated regret from engaging in a behavior (i.e., action regret) predicted weaker intentions and behavior, whereas greater anticipated regret from not engaging in a behavior (i.e., inaction regret) predicted stronger intentions and behavior. Anticipated action regret had smaller associations with behavioral intentions related to less severe and more distal hazards, but these moderation findings were not present for inaction regret. Anticipated regret generally was a stronger predictor of intentions and behavior than other anticipated negative emotions and risk appraisals. In conclusion, the research showed that anticipated inaction regret has a stronger and more stable association with health behavior than previously thought. According to the authors, the field should give greater attention to understanding how anticipated regret differs from similar constructs, its role in health behavior theory, and its potential use in health behavior interventions. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2cd6vub.
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The featured study by Collie et al. (2016) aimed to deepen knowledge about teachers’ psychological functioning at work—including the contextual, basic psychological need satisfaction and personal factors relevant to this. The researchers examined the extent to which perceived autonomy support predicts basic psychological need satisfaction and, in turn, whether need satisfaction predicts teachers’ perceptions of well-being, motivation, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Participants, 485 Canadian school teachers (76% female), completed an online questionnaire. Findings indicated that perceived autonomy support—the perception that an authority figure supports individuals’ interests, is respectful of their perspective, and promotes choice—positively predicted need satisfaction, and, in turn, need satisfaction predicted the work-related perceptions. Of particular importance were the differing roles played by the basic psychological needs in predicting each of the work-related perceptions. Additional analyses revealed that well-being and motivation played key mediating roles in how need satisfaction was associated with job satisfaction (but less so with commitment) and that teachers’ personal characteristics played minor moderating roles in influencing how teachers’ workplace beliefs and perceptions were associated. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2c2bP4I.
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Over the past decade, the Veterans Health Administration has supported multiple national rollouts of evidence-based treatments for mental health disorders. Recent studies have shown, however, that the majority of veterans with mental health diagnoses are not utilizing psychotherapy services. In this article, Wierwille et al. (Online First) attempt to address one of the more commonly known barriers to treatment, distance to care. The authors do this by comparing the effectiveness of outpatient and telehealth cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and prolonged exposure (PE) Therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a Veteran clinical sample. Analyses revealed statistically significant differences between the outpatient and telehealth treatments once baseline demographic and symptom severity differences were taken into account. Given that a number of randomized control studies have not found similar outcome differences, future research would benefit from examining whether the outcomes differences in the present study are because of treatment delivery method or sample differences. #Veterans completing treatment via outpatient and #telehealth delivery methods achieved clinically significant change in PTSD from pre- to posttreatment. These results suggest that delivering evidence-based treatment for PTSD via telehealth may be a viable treatment option for veterans who cannot easily access care because of geographic distance. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2dgluJ9.
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In a criminal justice system in which almost every adjudicated defendant, regardless of age, pleads guilty, it becomes important to understand the decision-making process underlying this choice. In the featured article, Redlich and Shteynberg (Online First) examined how age (juvenile vs. young adult), guilt versus innocence, and #plea comprehension influenced the decision to plead guilty and the underlying plea rationale. The researchers found that whereas age did not affect willingness to plead guilty when participants were asked to assume guilt in a hypothetical scenario, juveniles were more than twice as likely as young adults to plead guilty when asked to assume innocence. In addition, consistent with past research and developmental theory, juveniles were significantly less likely than adults to consider the short- and long-term consequences of the decision, and to understand and appreciate plea-related information. The authors also found that #legal knowledge, after controlling for age, was positively (albeit weakly) related to plea decisions, but only for guilty participants. Implications for juveniles and adults involved in the criminal justice system, as well as wrongful convictions, are discussed. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2cOFajL. 
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STATISTICAL METHODS IN GROUP PSYCHOLOGY AND GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY

The latest special issue of Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice gathers 8 articles that are structured as tutorials for conducting #statistical analyses that are appropriate to capture the unique and emergent properties of groups (Tasca, 2016). The articles are geared toward new researchers, students, and interested readers who want to learn to conduct or evaluate a study using these statistical methods. Statistical methods reviewed in this special issue include the latent group model, multilevel methods to assess between and within-leader variance, multilevel confirmatory factor analysis, the relational event model, the social relations model, sequential analysis, recurrence analysis, and statistical discourse analysis. Each article presents the main concepts, a running example, instructions on how to run the analyses and interpret outputs, suggestions on when to use the technique, and common problems that may be encountered when using these methods. Most of the articles provide equations that are concretely explained, computer syntax, example data, annotated bibliographies, and website links. The articles in this special section represent a sampling of the state of the art in statistical methodology for group #psychology and group psychotherapy research. To read the special issue, including the freely available introduction, see: http://on.apa.org/2cEloKU.
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Evidence indicates that children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (#ADHD) experience acute and prolonged academic impairment and underachievement including marked difficulty with completing homework. This study by Merrill et al. (Online First) is the first to examine the effects of behavioral, psychostimulant, and combined treatments on homework problems, which have been shown to predict academic performance longitudinally. Children with ADHD and their families were randomly assigned to either behavioral treatment (homework-focused parent training and a daily report card; BPT + DRC) or a waitlist control group. Children also participated in a concurrent psychostimulant crossover trial conducted in a summer treatment program. Children’s objective homework completion and accuracy were measured as well as parent-reported child homework behaviors and parenting skills. The study found that BPT + DRC had large effects on objective measures of homework completion and accuracy. Other findings, including unimodal medication and incremental combined treatment benefits, were not significant.

The study provides additional evidence that behavioral treatment is efficacious in improving homework performance among children with ADHD. Despite being advertised as beneficial, long-acting stimulant medication is not recommended by the authors for the remediation of homework problems at this time. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2ctRFRz.
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Pregnancy loss is common and can be devastating for those who experience it. However, a historical focus on negative outcomes, and grief in particular, has rendered an incomplete portrait of both the gravity of the loss, and the potential for growth in its wake. Consistent with contemporary models of growth following bereavement, this study explored the occurrence of posttraumatic growth following pregnancy loss and further assessed the role of core belief disruptions and common loss context factors across perinatal grief, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and posttraumatic growth (Krosch & Shakespeare-Finch, Online First). Women who had experienced a miscarriage or stillbirth were recruited through perinatal loss support groups and completed an online survey that assessed core belief disruption, perinatal grief, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, loss context factors, and demographics. Results of the study suggest that pregnancy loss can be a traumatic event, that core belief disruptions play a significant role in posttrauma outcomes, and that other factors may contribute to grief, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and posttraumatic growth following pregnancy loss that warrant further research (e.g., rumination). Despite potential methodological and sampling limitations, the use of validated measures to assess posttraumatic growth in a large sample represents a robust attempt to quantify the occurrence of posttrauma change following pregnancy loss. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/2cfXLFX.
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A recently published qualitative study by Huang, Chen, and Ponterotto (2016) explored the experiences of second-generation heterosexual Chinese and Taiwanese Americans who have gay biological #siblings. Participants had been aware of their gay sibling’s sexual orientation for over 2 years. The authors explored the participants’ overall experience in relation to their gay sibling’s coming out, how their sibling and family relationships evolved over time, and how traditional Asian values were related to their worldview and relationships to family members over time. All participants reported undergoing personal changes and struggles that were ultimately positive, including: becoming more open-minded, engaging in active self-reflection and learning, and experiencing an increase in empathy. Participants became more involved in #LGBT issues and other political issues involving marginalized, minority populations. Sibling relationships usually became closer as a result of discovering a gay sibling’s sexual orientation and participants would stand up for their lesbian or gay sibling in and outside of the family. The participants who held strong Christian beliefs struggled with their religious values and reevaluated how they could love and accept their gay sibling while maintaining their faith. The principal investigator of this study, Dr. Jill Huang, was pleasantly surprised by the love participants had for their lesbian and gay siblings. Love prevailed over the seeming incompatibility of the Chinese culture and lesbian and gay sexual orientation and often changed the participants personally to develop a deeper awareness and appreciation for difference. To read this freely available article, see: http://on.apa.org/2cdpPMu.

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