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Discuss your +APA Style needs by participating in a focus group at the APA Convention, and receive a $25 gift card that can be redeemed in the APA Store during convention. All participants are also eligible to win a Kindle Fire. For more information, contact Anne Gasque at agasque@apa.org.
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Hoffner et al. (2015) examined the perceived influence of news coverage of the Virginia Tech shootings on self and others’ attitudes about mental illness, and behavioral outcomes, as a function of personal experience with mental illness. Perceived negative influence of news on others’ attitudes, but not self, was higher for those who had greater experience with mental illness. Fear predicted perceived news influence on self (but not others), primarily for people who had no personal experience with #mentalillness. Further, for people without mental illness experience, perceived news influence on their own attitudes toward mental illness was associated with more engagement in support/comfort activities and greater likelihood of online opinion expression. To read more, see: http://on.apa.org/1JE6fgE.
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Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by disturbances in emotional, behavioral, and social functioning. The relation between BPD and empathy is complex because conflicting evidence exists of the levels of empathic processing related to the disorder. Haas and Miller (2015) studied the association between BPD traits and brain activity during an empathic processing task. Higher BPD trait scores were associated with hypoactivity in two brain regions involved in cognitive empathy. These data provide support to existing models describing the heterogeneous nature of BPD and suggest that reduced neural activity may in part affect altered empathic processing in BPD. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/1f0imMV.
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ΘΕΟΔΟΣΙΑ ΚΟΤΣΟΚΩΣΤΑ ΨΥΧΙΑΤΡΟΣ (Theodosia Kotsokosta, M.D. Psychiatrist)'s profile photomatthew steeves's profile photo
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A recent study examined associations between ‪#‎gratitude‬, spiritual well-being, sleep, mood, fatigue, ‪#‎cardiac‬-specific selfefficacy, and inflammation in 186 men and women with Stage B asymptomatic heart failure (Mills et al., 2015). The researchers found that gratitude and spiritual well-being were related to better mood and sleep, less fatigue, and more self-efficacy, and that gratitude fully or partially mediated the beneficial effects of spiritual well-being on those endpoints. To access the free article, click here: http://on.apa.org/1GcEYzq.
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With growing concerns over the obesity epidemic in the United States and other developed countries, many organizations have taken steps to incorporate healthy workplace practices. However, most workers are still sedentary throughout the day—a major contributor to individual weight gain. Sliter and Yuan (2015) sought to gather preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of active workstations, which are a possible intervention that could increase employees’ physical activity while they are working. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/1CrYrRU. To read the USA Today feature of this study, see: http://on.apa.org/1CrYtsJ.
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The large presence of social media in day-to-day life has raised many questions about how individuals present themselves on these platforms. Barry et al. (2015) examined the associations of narcissism and self-esteem with the posting of self-photographs (“selfies”) on a popular photo sharing social networking site (i.e., Instagram). Selfies were coded according to their frequency relative to participants’ nonselfie posts and their apparent themes (i.e., physical appearance, activity/event/location, etc.). The hypothesized relations of narcissism and self-esteem with the posting of #selfies independent of theme were not significant. However, there was a significant relation between some dimensions of #narcissism and specific categories of selfies (e.g., vulnerable narcissism with physical appearance selfies). To read more, see: http://on.apa.org/1FVjF5u.
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Check out the latest episode of the APA journals podcast! In this episode, Dr. Dewey Cornell discusses his article on gun ‪#‎violence‬ and school safety. Dr. Cornell argues that school safety should focus on the everyday problems of ‪#‎bullying‬ and fighting while applying established preventative public health interventions. The article was published in a special section of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. For more information and to listen to the podcast, see: http://on.apa.org/1DMkduK.
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Using self-determination theory, Kipp and Weiss (2015) examined longitudinal relationships among perceived social influences (coach-created motivational climate, coach interpersonal style, friendship quality), psychological need satisfaction, and well-being among female adolescent gymnasts. Results provide partial support for self-determination theory and reveal the mechanisms by which coaches can influence well-being over time. To read more about the method and findings, see: http://on.apa.org/1gSrkNj.
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Boyd et al. (2015) examined whether adolescents' medical use of anxiolytic (antianxiety) or sleep ‪#‎medication‬ was associated with increased incidence of their using someone else's prescription for nonmedical use. Compared with adolescents who were never prescribed such medication, adolescents who were prescribed these medicines during the study period were 10 times more likely to engage in nonmedical use for reasons such as "to get high" or "to experiment". Adolescents prescribed anxiolytics during their lifetime, but not during the 3-year study, were 12 times more likely to use another’s anxiolytic medication. These risk factors have significant implications for later substance use problems. To read this free article, see: http://on.apa.org/1dWe7Ba.
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ΘΕΟΔΟΣΙΑ ΚΟΤΣΟΚΩΣΤΑ ΨΥΧΙΑΤΡΟΣ (Theodosia Kotsokosta, M.D. Psychiatrist)'s profile photomatthew steeves's profile photo
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Anxiety following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common problem; however, differing estimates of prevalence limit the clinical benefits of research. Osborn and colleagues (2015) examined how differences in methodological variables and sample characteristics impacted the prevalence of ‪#‎anxiety‬. Findings of the study showed that anxiety is common after a ‪#‎TBI‬ and ongoing monitoring and treatment should be provided. Methodological and sample characteristics should be clear and well-defined, as differences across studies (e.g., time since injury, injury severity) impact prevalence rates. To read this article, see: http://on.apa.org/1Hmgwwz.
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Conocimiento Global (Global Knowledge)'s profile photoΘΕΟΔΟΣΙΑ ΚΟΤΣΟΚΩΣΤΑ ΨΥΧΙΑΤΡΟΣ (Theodosia Kotsokosta, M.D. Psychiatrist)'s profile photo
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Burkhouse et al. (2015) looked at whether a physiological reaction to depression-relevant stimuli, measured via pupil dilation, can serve as a biomarker of ‪#‎depression‬ risk among children of depressed mothers. Participants included 47 mother–child dyads; all mothers had a history of major depressive disorder. Pupil dilation was recorded while children viewed angry, happy, and sad faces. Follow-up assessments, in the form of structured interviews, occurred 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after the initial assessment. The researchers assessed the children’s levels of depressive symptoms as well as the onset of depressive diagnoses. Children exhibiting relatively greater pupil dilation to sad faces experienced elevated trajectories of depressive symptoms across the follow-up as well as a shorter time to depression onset. These findings were not observed for children’s pupillary reactivity to angry or happy faces. The current findings suggest that physiological reactivity to sad stimuli, assessed using pupillometry, serves as a potential biomarker of depression risk among children of depressed mothers. To read this study, see: http://on.apa.org/1LUGw9B.
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Have them in circles
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Greg Johannsen's profile photo
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APA Journals is dedicated to advancing psychology as a science and as a means of promoting health, education, and human welfare by disseminating psychological knowledge through our extensive catalog of peer-reviewed journals and other products.