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John Fleites
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John Fleites

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Wise advice from +Neila Rey
 
Top Affordable Protein Sources and Why You Should Base Your Diet Around Them

1. Canned Tuna [40g protein per can] 
2. Eggs [6g protein per egg] 
3. Pork Mince [20g protein per 100g]
4. Chicken Breasts [31g protein per 100g] 
5. Frozen Wild salmon [25g of protein per 100g]
6. Peanut butter [23g protein per 100g | 5.3 protein per serving] 
7. Greek Yoghurt 2% [10g protein per 100g] 
8. Milk 3% fat [8g protein per cup] 
9. Canned giant beans [6g protein per 100g, 15g per can]
10. Whey Protein [1 scoop of whey is 25g in which around 20g, depending on the brand, is protein] At two scoops a day a 10lbs container will last you around ten weeks. 

If you buy discounted meat with 30% off you’ll save a significant amount of money and from my point of view there is nothing wrong with meat that was full price yesterday and is discounted today. I often buy in bulk whenever there is special offer or a promotion and freeze the meat. I make my own burgers from pork or turkey mince and freeze them for a later date. Meat can be frozen for up to two months just make sure you separate the portions so you don’t have to defrost the entire container – once you defrost something you can’t put it back in the freezer. 

I prefer to buy low fat milk and yoghurt simply because I don’t need the extra calories. If you are skinny and you need to gain weight go for full fat. If you drink a litre of full fat milk a day it’ll help you gain higher muscle mass. 

Frozen wild salmon isn’t all that expensive especially if you wait for better offers at the nearest supermarket. I often buy wild salmon to have it at least once a week with rice and steamed vegetables. You can also find it canned which will be an even better option than tuna. Also keep in mind that tuna is high in mercury so I wouldn’t suggest you eat more than 250g a day. 

Beans may not be everyone’s food of choice but they are cheap, accessible and easy to make (re-heat in the microwave and you are done). I often buy whole boxes of giant beans in red sauce to have during the week with whole wheat tortillas. A plate of hot giant beans + 2 tortillas will give you 25g of protein. 

I used to have reservations about the tabs of protein powder bodybuilders buy. After all, that was not my intention to get bulky or use some cheesy magic foods to improve my fitness. For me, if it comes in powdered form it should be approached sceptically at the very least. Of course, when I struggled to gain any muscle (never mind big) I started looking up other sources of protein but eggs and chicken (there is only so much I can physically eat during the day). Then I came across whey protein which is in fact a by-product of cheese production and that seemed to make sense to me. There are different types and health claims (anti-inflammatory or anti-cancer properties) attributed to protein powders and there aren’t any actual draw backs to speak of except of milk allergies some people might experience. I use it as a supplement for my post-workout protein blends. I usually make a blend with a low fat yoghurt, fruit or berries of any kind and that counts as a micro-meal. Basically, that’s just enriching an ordinary yoghurt with high amounts of protein. I prefer ordinary whey protein to any super mixes or engineered formulas (you can never trust an engineer! : ) 

Of course, my absolute favourite is Greek yoghurt. I can eat it all day with a little bit of cinnamon sprinkled over the top. It tastes great and it keeps me feeling full. Actually, apart from my home made protein bars Greek yoghurt is the best hunger killer, for me personally. 

The more muscle you have the more calories you burn daily – muscle is kind of high maintenance energy wise. People who try to lose weight often overlook the importance of muscle growth that will actually aid them in burning the fat later on. If you are afraid to get bulky make sure you get enough cardio in your training as your body optimises the muscle density is not going to increase but stay lean. Runners can’t get huge muscle because of that, for example. 

Your body is smart and it optimises itself for the lifestyle. If you eat carbs and sit on your arse all day long it’ll take the shape of your sofa. If you run daily and you eat protein you’ll get a lean muscled body. It’s very smart that way. If growing big muscles and gaining weight is your goal you’ll need to eat extra high protein meals during the day for higher calories intake. The more calories you eat the more building material you’ll have. 
If you need to lose weight protein diets are the best. Low calorie diets may work fast but you lose too much muscle in the process and then gain fat back a lot faster. If you keep your meals high protein and low fat you’ll not just lose weight but you’ll get to see the muscles you already have. As a runner I often carry an extra few pounds on me for my long runs but if I need to drop them I often use protein diets to shed the weight. 

A sample meal plan would be:
Breakfast: 3 whole eggs with spinach or olives
Snack [only if you absolutely need to]: 200g low fat Greek yoghurt 
Lunch: 1 can of tuna with lettuce salad
Post workout: 1 scoop whey blended with 250g yoghurt and half a banana
Dinner: 150g chicken breast with brown rice & broccoli
Before bed [only if you absolutely need to]: 200g low fat Greek yoghurt with berries & flax seeds

More extreme version:
3 eggs whites fried for breakfast
Container of Greek yoghurt 500g with cinnamon - spread during the day
1 scoop whey blended with 250g yoghurt - post-workout
Lean meat or fish (chicken, very lean pork or salmon) grilled with steamed vegetables for dinner
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brian perry's profile photo
 
Hi can u set a diet for me,i have been in a chair for 18 mths owing to an accident &cannot do physical can u help want to loose 80 k b p
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John Fleites

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Happy 9 year anniversary +Gmail
 
Gmail turns 9 this month!  You can take a look at all that’s happened in Gmail over the last 9 years.  Here’s to year ten! 

Read more on the blog:
http://gmailblog.blogspot.com/2013/04/gmail-9-years-and-counting.html
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John Fleites

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First scientific article I have seen discussing this topic. I am sure there are others out there
 
What is the perfect size for a penis? Apparently, 12.8–14.2 centimetres in its flaccid state, according to new research. The finding suggests that women’s preferences could have fuelled the evolution of the human male penis, which is longer and thicker than that of any other primate.
http://www.nature.com/news/bigger-not-always-better-for-penis-size-1.12770
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Vintage Social Networking

:) Where's Google+?
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This is exactly why
 
That's why.
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Today's TED Talk: Did you know? The word "scientist" wasn't coined until 179 years ago.

Laura Snyder tells the story of the Philosophical Breakfast Club, a group of "natural philosophers" who revolutionized science, and became the first to call themselves "scientists."
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Transparent Brain

Using a technique to make a preserved brain transparent, researchers can now study the organ in detail without having to dissect it
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Man oh man...
 
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GeForce GTX Titan: New record-setting graphics card from +ASUS

Simply the most powerful single-GPU graphics card currently available. :-)

E36658 / P37263 / X22076 in 3DMark11 & 21818 in 3DMark Fire Strike.

ROG's Andre Yang and Shamino used liquid nitrogen-cooled ASUS GeForce GTX Titan cards in an +NVIDIA SLI configuration on ROG Rampage IV Extreme motherboards. VR Zone's article: http://goo.gl/smQTY
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A Supernova’s Tale

A supernova is the last gasp of a dying star. 

A star is driven by two basic forces: gravity and pressure.  Gravity tries to squeeze a star as tightly as possible.  This causes tremendous heat and pressure in the center of the star, which is great enough to ignite fusion in the star’s core.  For most of a typical star’s life hydrogen and helium are fusing in the core, which creates enough pressure to balance the weight of gravity.  

There are two main ways that hydrogen and helium can fuse.  The first is known as the p-p (or proton-proton) chain, where hydrogen nuclei (protons) fuse into helium nuclei.  The second is known as the CNO cycle, which stands for carbon-nitrogen-oxygen.  In this process hydrogen can fuse with carbon to produce nitrogen, and with nitrogen to produce oxygen, and with oxygen to produce carbon and helium.  As a result, the CNO cycle fuses hydrogen into helium and a bit of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen.  Stars are mostly hydrogen and helium, so for most of a star’s life it fuses hydrogen into helium in these two ways, and the heat and pressure generated by the fusion balances the weight of gravity.  A star in this phase is known as a main sequence star. 

It turns out that the p-p chain is easier for a star to achieve, but the CNO cycle produces more energy.  This is why main sequence stars (including our sun) gradually increase in temperature.  A young star around the mass of our sun is largely driven by the p-p chain, but over time, as more hydrogen is converted to helium the CNO cycle becomes more common.  As the star gradually shifts the from lower-energy p-p cycle to the higher energy CNO cycle, the star gradually gets hotter.  

Of course eventually a star will have fused most of its hydrogen into helium.  As the star’s core runs out of hydrogen fuel, its pressure and temperature will drop, and gravity is able to compress the star a bit more.  What happens then depends on the size of the star.

For a sun like star, the further collapse of the star triggers helium to start fusing into higher elements.  The process can get a bit complicated, but basically helium fuses at higher temperatures and can produce more energy.  The core gets hot enough that the outer layers of the star are pushed outward.  As a result, the star swells into a red giant.  During the red giant stage about half the star’s mass can be lost out into space.  Eventually, the helium will stop fusing, and the remaining mass of the star will again collapse inward.  

A star the size of our Sun can’t really fuse elements higher than helium.  So when its helium runs out it can’t generate any more energy in its core.  Gravity can squeeze the mass of a star into a tightly packed mass known as a white dwarf.  A white dwarf has the mass of a star, but it about the size of the Earth.  Gravity has squeezed the star smaller and smaller, but there is a limit.

Atoms are basically small nuclei (protons and neutrons) with clouds of electrons surrounding them.  Electrons need a certain amount of space, and if you try to push them into a smaller space, they push back (this effect is often referred to as the Pauli exclusion principle).  So as gravity squeezes the remains of a star more tightly, it reaches a point where the electrons push back, preventing gravity from squeezing any further.  Gravity and the electrons reach a stalemate.  

But there’s a limit to how strongly the electrons can push back.  This means there’s a limit to how much mass a white dwarf can have.  If a white dwarf has a mass about 40% greater than that of our Sun, then its gravity is strong enough to overpower the electrons.  Gravity can actually squeeze the electrons into the protons, so that the star basically becomes a giant mass of neutrons.  The star then collapses down to a diameter of tens of kilometers, becoming a neutron star.  If the star is massive enough, gravity can even collapse the neutrons, creating a stellar-mass black hole.

Large stars can fuse helium into higher elements, so at their end of days they can fuse higher and higher elements, thus delaying the inevitable.  But fusion only gives you energy for elements up to iron.  If you try to fuse elements higher than iron it actually costs you energy.  And this causes a star to end with a bang.   As the core of a massive star fuses higher and higher elements, it reaches a point where it starts to fuse iron into higher elements, but this costs energy, so the temperature and pressure of the core plummets.  It drops so quickly that the outer layers are basically in free fall.  The core collapses, and the rest of the star starts to follow.  

When matter reaches the core of the star, two things happen.  The first is that iron and other elements fuse into higher elements.  All the elements beyond iron, everything past element 26 on the periodic table, was produced during the core collapse of some star.  The second is that the very center of the core is compressed into a sea of neutrons (basically a neutron star) and the neutrons push back.  The neutrons push against the outer layers of the star with such force that the star rips apart in a massive explosion.  You can see a simulation of such an explosion in the figure below (http://goo.gl/1P8lt).

The result is a supernova.  For a brief period the star shines as bright as a galaxy.  Great quantities of heavier elements are tossed outward into space.  And all that remains of the star is a neutron core. 

Only large stars can become a supernova through the collapse of its core, but there is a way for a Sun-like star to become a supernova.  This type of supernova is less common.  It involves an interesting dance with another star, and when it explodes it tells us just how far away it is.

But I’ll talk about that next time.
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