Profile cover photo
Profile photo
F1Pro Market
1 follower
1 follower
About
Communities and Collections
View all
Posts

Post has attachment
Asia Markets: Most Asian markets strengthen after Fed raises rates: Asian stock markets outside mainland China strengthened Thursday, after the Federal Reserve raised interest rates but stopped short of signaling a faster pace of increases for this year.

http://on.mktw.net/2G1Jn0P
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Have a home equity loan? Here's what you need to know about your taxes: If you don't know how President Trump's new tax law will affect you, you're not alone.

http://on.mktw.net/2FZ1gxm
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Who gets your IRA when you die? It's not so simple: If you want your assets to go to certain people upon your demise, make sure the paperwork reflects your wishes.

http://on.mktw.net/2DAoaJe
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A startling amount of land in Japan has no official owner:


Property, period

THE tsunami of 2011 left gaping holes reminiscent of war zones in the landscape along the coast of Tohuku, in the north-east of Honshu, Japan's main island. Car navigation systems gave directions to landmarks that had vanished into the sea. The subsequent reconstruction effort hit an unexpected roadblock: missing landowners. Officials were stunned to find that hundreds of plots were held in the names of people who were dead or unknown.
The deluge threw the problem into particularly sharp relief in Tohuku, but it is widespread elsewhere too. A report last year for the government by a panel of experts estimated that about 41,000 sq km of land, or 11% of Japan's surface, was unclaimed, most of it in rural regions. By 2040, it warned, the area could more than double. The cumulative cost in lost productivity could be as high as ¥6trn ($56bn).

The countryside is littered with vacant plots and empty houses. Some date from Japan's great post-... http://econ.st/2FPvqTr
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Do credit booms foretell emerging-market crises?: ON THE morning of December 7th 1941, George Elliott Junior noticed “the largest blip” he had ever seen on a radar near America's naval base at Pearl Harbour. His discovery was dismissed by his superiors, who were thus unprepared for the Japanese bombers that arrived shortly after. The mistake prompted urgent research into “receiver operating characteristics”, the ability of radar operators to distinguish between true and false alarms.
A similar concern motivates research at the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) in Basel, Switzerland. Its equivalent to the radar is a set of economic indicators that can potentially detect the approach of financial crises. A prominent example is the “credit gap”, which measures the divergence between the level of credit to households and non-financial firms, expressed as a percentage of GDP, and its long-term trend. A big gap may reflect the kind of unsustainable credit boom that often precedes a crisis. Anything above 9% of GDP is reason to worry, according to Iñaki Aldasoro, Claudio Borio and Mathias Drehmann of the BIS.

The biggest blips on the oscilloscope include Canada (9.6%), Singapore (11.1%) and Switzerland (16.3%), according to the latest readings, released on March 11th. But the one that has kept everyone's eyes peeled is China, with a gap of 16.7% in the third quarter of 2017 (the latest BIS figure... http://econ.st/2FRM4BK
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Protectionism may impede Delta's expansion plans:




AS AMERICA'S oldest airline still aloft, Delta makes much of its southern roots. At its biggest hub, Atlanta airport, the company museum recounts how it became the world's second-biggest carrier. The answer: by buying up domestic rivals. With few takeover targets left at home, Delta's chief executive, Ed Bastian, is looking abroad. But his plans for more foreign joint ventures (JVs) face regulatory headwinds.
Last year Mr Bastian announced a flurry of JVs. In May Delta launched one with Aeromexico and in June another with Korean Air. In July Delta formed one of the world's biggest JVs with Virgin Atlantic of Britain and Air France-KLM, a European group. In December it sealed one with WestJet, Canada's biggest low-cost carrier. It wants closer relations with China Eastern and GOL of Brazil, two airlines in which it owns shares. And on March 12th it emerged that Delta and Air France-KLM plan to bid for Air India, an ailing flag carrier. If all these deals come off, one passenger in eight... http://econ.st/2FYpwTw

Protectionism may impede Delta’s expansion plans
Protectionism may impede Delta’s expansion plans - Come fly with me
Protectionism may impede Delta’s expansion plans - Come fly with me
https://www.economist.com/news/business/21738923-airline-joint-ventures-are-facing-more-scrutiny-regulators-protectionism-may-impede-deltas?fsrc=rss|bus?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=Goulash&utm_campaign=RSS
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A lose-lose trade war looms between America and China:




PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP has not yet started a global trade war. But he has started a frenzy of special pleading and spluttered threats. In the week since he announced tariffs on steel and aluminium imports, countries have scrambled to win reprieves. Australia, the European Union and Japan, among others, have argued that, since they are America's allies, their products pose no risk to America's security. If these appeals fail, the EU has been most vocal in vowing to retaliate, in turn prompting Mr Trump to threaten levies on European cars.
In China, ostensibly the focus of Mr Trump's actions, the public response has been more restrained. Officials have said the two countries should strive for a “win-win outcome”, a favourite bromide in their lexicon. As a rival to America, China knows that an exemption from the tariffs is not on offer. It also knows that it needs to conserve firepower. If this is the first shot in a trade war, it is, for China, small bore. Its steel and aluminium exports to America amount to roughly 0.03% of its GDP, not... http://econ.st/2FOYzhC
A lose-lose trade war looms between America and China - Global trade
A lose-lose trade war looms between America and China - Global trade
https://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21738906-if-china-cannot-placate-donald-trump-it-will-fight-him-instead-lose-lose-trade?fsrc=rss|fec?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=Goulash&utm_campaign=RSS
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Unilever picks Rotterdam:




PROUDLY overlooking the River Thames, Unilever House looks more royal palace than office building. Built on the site of a Tudor estate, for nine decades it has been the London home to Unilever, one of the world's largest consumer-goods firms. Since a merger of British soapmakers and Dutch margarine merchants in 1929, Unilever has been a dual-nationality company. It is legally domiciled in Britain and the Netherlands, with headquarters in both the London building and in Rotterdam.
The appeal of dual citizenship has faded. After a year-long review, on March 15th Unilever's board announced plans to move its legal base to Rotterdam. (The firm will continue to have a listing in London, and claims no British jobs will be lost.) Many in the City of London finger Britain's decision to leave the European Union for the move. But Graeme Pitkethly, the firm's chief financial officer, insisted Brexit was “absolutely not a factor” in the decision. Over the past decade Unilever has been shifting its production facilities nearer to its customers in other... http://econ.st/2FUWHaz
Unilever picks Rotterdam - Going Dutch
Unilever picks Rotterdam - Going Dutch
https://www.economist.com/news/business/21738939-britains-largest-consumer-goods-firm-moves-its-headquarters-netherlands-unilever-picks?fsrc=rss|bus?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=Goulash&utm_campaign=RSS
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Germany's two biggest utilities strike a deal:


Windy with a chance of profits

WHEN Johannes Teyssen took control of E.ON in 2010, it was Germany's second-biggest company after Siemens, an industrial giant. From its headquarters in chic Düsseldorf, the utility looked down on RWE, its longtime rival, based in Essen, a down-at-heel former coal-and-steel town 40 minutes' drive away.
The illusion of superiority did not last. The following year Angela Merkel, Germany's chancellor, reacted to the meltdown at Fukushima in Japan by starting a process to shut down Germany's nuclear-power plants, on which both companies relied. Other aspects of the Energiewende, or energy transition, added to their woes, as lavish support for renewables clobbered the country's wholesale electricity prices. The companies' profits slumped, as did their share prices (see chart).

In 2016 E.ON recorded its biggest-ever loss, moved its headquarters from Düsseldorf to Essen, and reinvented itself as a renewable-energy business and a household gas-and-... http://econ.st/2HH51Ie

Germany’s two biggest utilities strike a deal
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A primer on blockchain-based versions of central-bank money:




BITCOIN, Ethereum, XRP, Stellar, Cardano: the infant world of cryptocurrencies is already mind-bogglingly crowded. Amid the cacophony of blockchain-based would-be substitutes for official currencies, central banks from Singapore to Sweden have been pondering whether they should issue digital versions of their own money, too. None is about to do so, but a report prepared by central-bank officials from around the world, published by the Bank for International Settlements on March 12th—a week before finance ministers and central-bank heads from G20 countries meet in Buenos Aires—offers a guide to how to approach the task.
The answer? With care. For a start, it matters who will be using these central-bank digital currencies (CBDCs). Existing central-bank money comes in two flavours: notes and coins available to anyone; and reserve and settlement accounts open only to commercial banks, already in electronic form (though not based on blockchain) and used for interbank payments. Similarly, CBDCs could be either widely available or tightly... http://econ.st/2DugWqd
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded