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Marcia Riefer Johnston
867 followers -
Author of "Word Up!" & "You Can Say That Again"
Author of "Word Up!" & "You Can Say That Again"

867 followers
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"When society becomes less than civil, there is no singular villain. And no lone superhero can come to the rescue. We the people create the majority of whatever darkness or light there is in human life. The power is ours. It’s up to us how we use it." +Carlos Abler

https://www.facebook.com/KindnessMap/posts/298941254030212 #KeepSeeingKindness #BeKind
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Want to write well? Open a Doerr—something written by Anthony Doerr, that is. My latest blog post gives my take on this Pulitzer winner's exquisite way with words.

http://writing.rocks/anthony-doerr-writing-examples/

HT to +Joe Pulizzi for calling my attention to this phenomenal writer in an Instagram post showing this cup.
Word Up!
Word Up!
writing.rocks
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The Kindness Map owes many of its stories—including this one—to +John Hedtke. Keep on sharing the good stuff, John. Anyone can drop a heart and share a story at https://Kindness-Map.com. Please do!

#KeepSeeingKindness #KindnessMatters #BeKind #KindnessConnects #BeAGoodPerson #RadicalKindness #KindnessIsContagious #InstaGood
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‪Know anyone looking for a 1BR apt to rent on Portland’s east side? Ray and I are the landlords.
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This week's letter comes to you from +Karen Ronning-Hall of Portland, Oregon. Karen is one of those people whose hand shoots up when volunteers are called for (and even when they aren't). She shares some thoughts here on listening as a kindness.

"One of the greatest kindnesses requires little effort and no physical exertion at all. It's easy as ice cream on a hot day, and just as delicious: listening! Anybody can do it. All it requires is clean ears and an attentive, receptive mind.

"Sometimes I think that I can multitask while listening. I call this pretend listening. Pretend listening is like junk food. It looks like you are getting something good, but it provides no nourishment. When my daughters were younger, I had perfected the art of pretend listening. I could juggle three tasks at once while pretending to listen to my child—make a peanut butter sandwich, mentally edit my to-do list, and smile and nod as my kid talks on and on and on about … something.

"'Mommy, are you listening to me?'

"That's a clue to me that I've been pretend listening and that it's time to slow down and pay attention—listen with my eyes and ears and notice the full communication of the person in front of me. Whenever I do that, something magical happens. The people talking to me light up. They can see that their message has been heard, and that somebody cares about what they have to say.

"Besides giving the speaker the gift of being heard, listening gives the listener the gift of connection and understanding. When I listen to you, I take a journey into your world. I look through your eyes. I may learn something new or be touched and moved by your experience. When I listen, I feel warm, as if something glues us together. This glue can stick around, even long after the conversation has ended."

Karen

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This week’s Kindness Map newsletter was contributed by Dave Anthony of Cleveland, Ohio, without whose commitment, generosity, and technical expertise the Map would not exist. For those of you who don't subscribe, here's what Dave wrote:

"My kids recently went to visit their grandparents for a long weekend. My oldest daughter, the proud owner of a new temporary driver’s permit, drove. When they got home, my youngest daughter ran in.

"'Dad, guess what! Wait! Never mind! It’s not my story to tell!'

"They all brought their stuff in from the car as quickly as they could, grins all over the place. When they finally made it in for good, they gathered around the driver. She told me that they had seen a lump off to the side of the road and wondered if it was an animal. She turned the car around and returned to the spot. Sure enough, the lump was alive, if barely: a puppy, dirty and curled up. When they picked him up with a T-shirt, he hardly moved. They figured he hadn’t eaten in a while. They took him to the police station.

"That's the story that I set out to share here: kindness to a puppy in need. As I write, though, another act of kindness comes to me, a story within the story—something that, until now, only I knew about. Did you catch it?

"'Wait! Never mind!' How selfless of my youngest daughter to stop herself from stealing the show. I could tell that she had wanted to blurt out the news about the puppy rescue, and, being the first in the door, she'd had every right. But she chose to let her sister have the joy of telling the story.

"The beauty of it is that she was all smiles as the story unfolded to me. She experienced the paradox of self-sacrifice: most often we receive a greater benefit by giving than by receiving.

"Be kind today. Look for opportunities to give of yourself, particularly when you might not get recognized for what you've done. You won't be sorry."

Dave
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If you'd like to get this newsletter in your inbox every Monday, subscribe at the bottom of this page: kindness-map.com
The Kindness Map
The Kindness Map
kindness-map.com
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Today, a heart was dropped in South Korea on the Kindness Map (kindness-map.com). Thank you, Colleen.
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I just dropped a heart on the Kindness Map with this story: "For the past three years, once a week during the school year, my sister spends an hour mentoring a student: playing board games, helping with school work, 'just being a friend' through a group called Kids Hope USA. Her student is about to start fifth grade."

HT to said sister, +Wendy Hood, whose lifetime of kind acts would cover the whole map with hearts if they could all be captured.

How about you? Got a sister (or brother, son, daughter, dad, mom, uncle, aunt, cousin, spouse, teacher, colleague, student, neighbor, friend, or someone whose name you don't even know) whose kindness merits acknowledging? Drop a heart of your own, and share a story with the world here: kindness-map.com

#KeepSeeingKindness
The Kindness Map
The Kindness Map
kindness-map.com
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