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isabelle simard
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Le plan Nord expliqué
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Zelijko : vous parlez français?
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le japon et la miniaturisation ;)
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Tres beau
 
Bioluminescense is light produced by a chemical reaction which originates in an organism. There are a variety of examples of it, but most come from creatures in the ocean. This image comes from this National Geographic website: http://bit.ly/GS1jav and what you're seeing here is phytoplankton.

I did not take this shot, but I'm sharing it because I want to seek out something like this... Anyone know where this is going on in the world right now? I'd love to go see it and photograph it. If you start searching and finding other cool photographs, please hashtag them so I can see what you find. #bioluminescence

Here's an old-school website about the phenomena: http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/~biolum/
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Surréel!
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L300 - Large Chicken Coop Plans - How To Build A Chicken Coop - Free Chicken Coop Plans The picture below is the Concept Plans. Detailed Plans for construction is being done. If you like these plans, ...
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João Figueiredo originally shared:
 
Imagine your people had no written language and you wanted to record a story, a proverb, a riddle or a song. How would you go about it?

You could use a wide range of mnemonics, making it easier for other people to learn, remind, and reproduce your story by heart:
- Your narratives could be made to rhyme, or be created according to rigid poetic meters;
- You could create symbols or pictographs that depicted specific themes, then to be arranged in a certain order, to remind their viewers of the narratives;
- You could use maths and algorithms.

The Tchokwé people of the Northeast of Angola came up with a method of embedding mathematical ideals into their recordings of all kinds of narratives, the sona (sing. lusona ), making their transmission easier.

The Mozambican ethno-mathematician Paulus Gerdes has been studying this tradition for decades now. As a deeply felt homage I would like to share some of his findings with you (and point you to a couple of places where you can find a lot more about him, and sona ).

So the Tchokwé have two aesthetic values that they upheld throughout their cultural productions: symmetry and monolinearity. Tchokwé sculptures are symmetric, their tattoos and scarification are either monolinear (images drawn with a single, continuous line), symmetric, or both. The sona are sand drawings, sometimes made permanent by being painted in walls, with white clay, and are embedded with both principles.

A storyteller called akwa kuta sona (those who know how to draw) will start by making the sand before him (women also use mathematics to tell stories, but usually on other media*) perfectly flat, then "punctuate" this space with an array, or matrix, of equidistant dots (pictures 2 and 3). Then the drawing truly begins. He cannot raise his finger (the drawing must be monolinear) and he has to encompass all the dots in the matrix, preferentially forming a symmetric pattern.

The result will be used to explain a proverb, tell a story, pose a riddle or remind the audience of a song. Each final drawing is connected to a single one of those specific cultural creations, and is a mnemonic to help their reproduction.

But the drawings are so complex (and so diverse) that the Tchokwé had to come up with another mnemonic to help them remembering and transmitting them to their sons! Thus they began using what we call algorithms, as a set of rules to produce and remix specific categories of sona . The use of sona as mnemonics was so effective, that some of them eventually were carried on by slaves to the other side of the Atlantic, and are still transmitted today by their descendants...

In the pictures I will show you some examples of sona.

->The first is of a simple sand drawing or sona **.

->The next four are instruction on how to "punctuate" the sand, and examples of the principles of symmetry and monolinearity.***

->The following are taken from a paper by Paulus Gerdes (in their description I copied the text this author used to explain the pictures) and read as a series**.

->Then, I share with you a page of one of Paulus' textbooks, aimed at teaching maths to African kids with the help of local traditions.***

->Finally, the last picture is one of an Indian rangoli, because I find them shockingly similar to sona. Are the same algorithms used by rangoli artists as well? I really don't know.

Hope you enjoy my contribution to this year's first #ScienceSunday, curated by +Allison Sekuler and +Robby Bowles. Have a great 2012!

Sources:

*Paulus Gerdes has a book called Women, Art and Geometry in Southern Africa that deals with this topic. A review here:
http://test.maa.org/reviews/wagsa.html
**Taken from here:
http://angolarising.blogspot.com/2010/12/history-and-culture-written-in-sand.html
***Taken from here:
http://books.google.pt/books?hl=en&lr=&id=nqbAACk2CgYC&oi=fnd&pg=PA7&dq=paulus+gerdes&ots=nOghJg_eW9&sig=AkwDyWmAwElXhc0gs7xfClXawvw&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=paulus%20gerdes&f=false
****The original essay is called Ethnomathematics as a new research field, illustrated by studies of mathematical ideas in African history can be found here (*for free!*):
http://iascud.univalle.edu.co/libro/libro_pdf/Ethnomathematics%20as%20a%20new%20research.pdf
*****Preview here:
http://books.google.pt/books?id=rRDbdeWoZEMC&pg=PA73&lpg=PA73&dq=paulus+gerdes+sona+activities+for+children&source=bl&ots=Cd8t_togxC&sig=qqSHeLLhVBv-Fq9E6yjjgFvYt8M&hl=en&sa=X&ei=d70AT4yQCoSXOpPjva8B&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=paulus%20gerdes%20sona%20activities%20for%20children&f=false
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isabelle simard

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http://vimeo.com/40837061
300 000 personnes pour faire l'arbre géant
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Bravo to Lane MacLeod Cruver for this beautiful example of lenticular clouds at sunset (or sunrise?) over Mt Rainier.

https://www.facebook.com/spidermacleod
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Liberté d'expression!
Derya Unutmaz originally shared:
 
This is a very good and articulate talk that explains the historical precedence to SOPA and what would happen if the government passes this law.

What does a bill like PIPA/SOPA mean to our shareable world? At the TED offices, Clay Shirky delivers a proper manifesto -- a call to defend our freedom to create, discuss, link and share, rather than passively consume.
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Have her in circles
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