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Roman Olynyk
414 followers -
Making things up as I go along.
Making things up as I go along.

414 followers
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It's beautiful when a shot doesn't need any touch-up work. This is just cropped and straightened. Shot with Canon FD 50 f/3.5 macro on Fotodiox adapter.
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Iris shot with a Canon FD 50 f/3.5 macro on a Fotodiox adapter
#fotodiox
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A common weed, Fleabane (Erigeron) is still pretty. There are hundreds of species of Erigeron species, so I'm not even going to attempt a full classification. Taken with an old Canon FD 50 f/3.5 macro lens.
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Four of a Kind - Bleeding hearts (Dicentra spectabilis)
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Four of a Kind - Bleeding hearts (Dicentra spectabilis)
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My picture of a Forget-Me-Not (Myosotis scorpides) was a little too blurry, so I put it through several layers of PhotoShop filters to create a painting effect.
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Flowers of the Princess Tree (Paulownia tomentosa), a native to central and western China, but a persistent invasive in North America. Although it's not named for Princess Leia, May the 4th be with you anyway.
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White Trilliums (Trillium grandiflorum) cover this wooded hillside near the Westover exit of I-79. According to one web site, Trilliums spread very slowly by underground root stocks, and the seed produced creates new plants even more slowly. From a planted seed, it takes approximately five to nine years for a Trillium grandiflorum plant to bloom. So when you see a massive drift of these in spring, you know you're looking at a bunch of plants that are at least a decade old, probably much older.
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White Trilliums (Trillium grandiflorum) cover this wooded hillside near the Westover exit of I-79. According to one web site, Trilliums spread very slowly by underground root stocks, and the seed produced creates new plants even more slowly. From a planted seed, it takes approximately five to nine years for a Trillium grandiflorum plant to bloom. So when you see a massive drift of these in spring, you know you're looking at a bunch of plants that are at least a decade old, probably much older.
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White Trilliums (Trillium grandiflorum) covering a wooded hillside as far as the eye can see.
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