Really pleased this has been published.

Hagedorn, G. et al. Creative commons licenses and the non-commercial condition: Implications for the re-use of biodiversity information 150, 127-149 (2011).
URL http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.150.2189.

After the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting this month, I was invited to give an impromptu pitch in front of the great and good of the Mammal AToL project & #MorphoBank (morphobank.org) people. Having pointed out to MorphoBank a while ago that they should really make explicit the terms and conditions [license] under which they make their (?) data available, I naturally advocated CC-BY 3.0 and CC0 licences. I talked about this very subject and pleaded with them NOT to use the NC clause refering to +Roderic D. M. Page & Peter Murray-Rust 's [1,2] thoughts on the matter. The trouble is, a lot of (data providing) institutions seem hell-bent on 'protecting commercial interests', at the expense of research opportunities. So as I understand it, at the moment databases such as these face an awkward problem of either satisfying the restriction requests of data providers OR satisfying permissiveness of re-use by data re-users [such as myself!], and the needs of both camps are seldom entirely met.

I see this paper as an important step in persuading such restriction-minded institutions of the absolute importance of #OpenData / #PantonPrinciples and how NC clauses can genuinely obstruct and impair real academic research.
I just hope people read it and take note!

cc +Daniel Mietchen +Gregor Hagedorn +Lyubomir Penev +Donald Hobern +Donat Agosti

[1] http://iphylo.blogspot.com/2010/12/plant-list-nice-data-shame-it-not-open.html
[2] http://blogs.ch.cam.ac.uk/pmr/2010/12/17/why-i-and-you-should-avoid-nc-licences/
Shared publiclyView activity