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Sarah Studebaker
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Should Know About the Unsafe Practice of Dry Needling

By: Michelle Gellis LAc MAc DiplAc

Over the past few months some of my patients have shared with me that they have been offered Dry Needling by their chiropractor or physical therapist and wanted to know what I thought about it. Here are some facts that you need to know:

“Dry Needling” is Acupuncture. Inserting an acupuncture needle into the body, under any pretense, for any purpose, is the practice of acupuncture. Physical therapists, chiropractors and other allied health professionals use this term to circumvent state laws governing acupuncture practice.
Tender or painful points, also referred to as “trigger points” or “motor points,” are Acupuncture points. In Chinese medicine these are known as “ashi” points. Those practicing “dry needing” will claim they are not treating acupuncture points, when in fact they are.
“Dry needling” is an invasive, acupunc­ture needle intervention. “Dry needling” is not “manual therapy”. Manual therapy is a noninvasive, hands-on intervention.
“Dry needling” is not a “technique”; It is Acupuncture. The act of inserting an acupuncture needle into the body, under any pretense, or for any purpose whatsoever is the practice of acupuncture.
Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice Acupuncture cannot legally purchase acupuncture needles. According to the Food and Drug Administration, (FDA), anyone who is not licensed by law to practice acupuncture cannot legally buy acupuncture needles. As class II medical devices mandating FDA prescription labeling on the packages, all acupuncture needle boxes state: “Cau­tion: Federal law restricts this device to sale by or on the order of qualified practitioners of acupuncture as determined by the states.”
Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are using acupuncture needles to perform “dry needling’. Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture would have you believe that they are not using acupuncture needles to perform “dry needling,” when they are, in fact, using acupuncture needles, which are clearly labeled as such on the package.
Physical therapists and other allied health professionals who are not licensed by law to practice acupuncture are not qualified to perform “dry needling.” 16 states have outlawed the practice of “dry needling” entirely. “Dry needling” is far outside both physical therapists’ and other allied health professionals’ scope of practice and their scope of education and training. In order to become a licensed acupuncturist you must complete between 660-870 hours of hands on, supervised training in the use of needles, 1245-1755 hours of training in diagnosis, safety, biomedicine, anatomy, theory and other topics, and a minimum of 250-350 supervised patient treatments prior to graduation and licensure. Yet physical therapists and other allied health professionals are inserting acupuncture needles (up to four inches or more in length) into patients with as little as a weekend workshop in acupuncture.
Patients are not safe when under-educated professionals perform “dry needling”. There are real risks associated with the use of acupuncture needles by physical therapists and other allied health professionals who lack the education and supervised clinical training of licensed acupuncturists. These real risks include, but are not limited to: blood vessel, nerve and organ injury from inappropriate acupuncture needle angle and depth of insertion or from inappropriate acupuncture needle manipulation, infection and cross infection from non-sterile re-insertion of acupuncture needles, poor hygiene in acupuncture needle handling, and inadequate skin preparation.
There are documented cases of injury from the use of acupuncture needles by allied health professionals who lack the education and supervised clinical training and examinations of licensed acupunc­turists. In one such case, Emily Kuykendall, a high school teacher from Maryland, had suffered nerve damage from the use of acupuncture needles by a physical therapist. In another such case, Kim Ribble-Orr, a former Olympic athlete from Canada, had suffered a punctured lung and a pneumothorax (the presence of air in the cavity between the lungs and the chest wall, causing collapse of the lung) from the use of acupuncture needles by a massage therapist.
Needling is a subtle skill that takes years to master. In Acupuncture School, we spend almost two years learning point location, and proper needle technique before we ever insert a needle into a patient. An acupuncture needle is a delicate instrument. Properly trained, an acupuncturist can tell when the tip of the needle is approaching structures such as nerves, blood vessels and the membrane surrounding bones or internal organs. The nature of the dry needling courses makes the ability to discern these subtle distinctions impossible. As a faculty member at the Maryland University of Integrative Health, one of the exercises I use to teach my students the subtly of inserting a needle is to have them insert a needle into an inflated balloon without popping it. Most students are surprised at how difficult it is. Like many things, acupuncture looks easy when performed by an expert, but in reality, it takes many years to master.
You certainly would not see your Acupuncturist for physical therapy or chiropractic after a couple of weekend courses; why would you go to your PT or chiropractor for Acupuncture (no matter what they may call it) after just a few hours of training?



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How does Acupuncture work? Why do I use that point?

Acupuncture of Powell
www.acupuncturepowell.com

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Acupuncture for Calming and Renewal.
Acupuncture of Powell presents another
Acupuncture Happy Hour! June 15, 2017 at 7PM

What is Acupuncture Happy Hour? (AHH)

AHH is your time. Seated comfortably in a leather recliner, in a beautiful space, you listen to calming music. The room is whisper quiet while receive gentle acupuncture on just a handful of acupoints. No disrobing required. Then you'll receive light stimulation of a few points in one ear. Breathe. Renew yourself with this wonderfully de-stressing indulgence. In about 30 minutes I'll place a few gorgeous Swarovski crystals and 14k gold ear "seeds" in your ear as I remove the needles. SEE IMAGE BELOW
These stay up to 5 days, and you massage them a few times a day to reinforce and prolong the calming effects of your treatment.

We’ll meet on one or two Thursdays a month, at 7PM at the All Life Center, 123 Hyatts Road. AHH is by scheduled reservation only as there are only 12 places available. Our next Acupuncture Happy Hour is scheduled for Thursday, June 15, 2017, 7PM -8PM at All Life Integrative Wellness Center.
To make your resevation:
*Direct email me: s.j.studebaker@gmail.com OR *Use the contact me link on hme page page of my website, www.acupuncturepowell.com

OR *Text or call me at 740-919-9292 to make your reservation.
The cost is 40.00 for each person. 

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ACUPUNCTURE HAPPY HOUR. RENEW AND DE-STRESS.

What is Acupuncture Happy Hour? (AHH)

AHH is your time. Seated comfortably in a leather recliner, in a beautiful space, you listen to calming music. The room is whisper quiet while receive gentle acupuncture on just a handful of acupoints. No disrobing required. Then you'll receive light stimulation of a few points in one ear. Breathe. Renew yourself with this wonderfully de-stressing indulgence. In about 30 minutes I'll place a few gorgeous Swarovski crystals with 14k gold ear "seeds" in your ear as I remove the needles.
These stay up to 5 days, and you massage them a few times a day to reinforce and prolong the calming effects of your treatment.
We’ll meet on most Thursdays at 7PM at the All Life Center, 123 Hyatts Road.
Text me at 740-919-9292 to make your reservation. There are only 12 places available each week.
Acupuncture of Powell, now also serving Delaware.

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Home Apple Cider Brew for Sinus Infections.
Add Acupuncture for faster relief from sinus pain and pressure.
Acupuncture of Powell
www.acupuncturepowell.com
740-919-9292

Apple Cider Vinegar Brew for Sinus Infections

A sinus infection is an inflammation of the lining of the sinuses that in many cases lead to persistent headaches, fevers and even facial pains. Fortunately, there are many natural remedies that are effective at cleaning the sinuses and killing the bacteria and viruses responsible for these health problems.
An acute sinusitis is a sinus infection that can last up to four weeks. While a chronic sinusitis can last 12 weeks or longer if left untreated.
Infections of the sinuses—the hollow air spaces within the bones in the cheek bones, forehead and between the eyes—are usually caused by either viruses or bacteria. They cause thick mucus blockage and painful or extreme discomfort in these cavities.
Prescribed antibiotics are not the best remedy for sinusitis as they can cause a lot of dangerous side effects. Your body should be given the right healing food to enable it to cure itself. In any case, antibiotics are not helpful if your sinusitis is caused by a virus.

HOW IT WORKS:
Apple Cider Vinegar
Apple cider vinegar has many practical uses. It is probably one of the top natural remedies for many ailments.
It contains vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and malic acids that are beneficial for killing bacteria. It works by binding to pathogens and help the body get rid of them more effectively. It is also effective for fighting viral, fungal and Candida infection.
Bragg Organic Raw Apple Cider Vinegar. (ACV)
When taken orally, ACV breaks up mucus and clear airways, while its antibacterial properties kill the infection-causing bacteria.
When mucus and nasal congestion is broken down, ACV delivers its rich nutrients to the body to support and strengthen the immune system, preventing the infection from getting worse.
Although acidic, ACV has all the necessary electrolytes to balance the body’s pH levels and effectively reduces body acidity. Harmful microbes (bacteria or viruses) love an acidic environment and by alkalizing the body it will stop the disease-causing microbes from multiplying. This is why consuming 1-2 tablespoons of ACV every day keeps the viruses away!
Cayenne Pepper
The active component of cayenne pepper is a compound in its fruit called capsaicin that gives the pepper its hot fiery taste. Capsaicin has long been used as a painkiller and for reducing nasal congestion.
There are a few ways you can take pepper to help clear a sinus infection. You can …
Use a capsaicin nasal sprayAdd ½ teaspoon in a cup of hot water and drink for several days till you recoverSniffing a small amount on a spoon to clear airwaysCayenne pepper works because when ingested, it helps to dilate vessels and help to break down mucus for draining. At the same time, this substance lessens your facial pain, reduces inflammation, stimulates circulation and acts as an antibacterial agent. All of these—and many more benefits of cayenne pepper—are helpful in preventing and relieving the symptoms of sinusitis.
APPLE CIDER VINEGAR BREW FOR SINUSES
Ingredients½ cup warm water (not hot)¼ cup Bragg apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon raw honey (or manuka honey)
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
Juice of 1 lemon wedge
Directions:Mix all these ingredients in a glass.Stir well and sip the mixture warm until the condition subsides.You may also use this mixture (without honey) to gargle to speed up your recovery.


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Acupuncture for OhioBWC Work Injury Treatment.
Let Acupuncture of Powell Help You lose the pain, and get back on your feet!

www.acupuncturepowell.com
A proud provider the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation
740-919-9292

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Acupuncture Relief from Allergies
Acupuncture of Powell
www.acupuncturepowell.com
740-919-9292

Acupuncture – The Original Bio-Hack For… Seasonal Allergies!
Many of us struggle with unpredictable seasonal-allergy symptoms. How does one create a plan of action to reduce the incidence and severity of an illness with such an unpredictable temperament? Luckily, acupuncture is like the duct tape of medical interventions, patching dysfunction and boosting the body’s natural resilience with the creative tenacity of MacGyver.
Acupuncture can often provide a measure of relief spanning several areas at once (stress relief, pain relief and immune system support at the same time). Because acupuncture’s mechanisms of action impact several biochemical pathways that influence seasonal allergies, it is a tool that works in both a preventive and a pain-relieving way. In this case, it treats nearly every stage of the seasonal allergy process (barring emergency medical conditions).
First stage: Annoyance and confusion. When did I start sniffling so much? Is my head hurting in general or just when I work? Am I getting weaker or, is it actually more difficult to breathe? Is it (cedar/grass/mold etc.) season?
Acupuncture solution: Head it off at the pass! This is not a time to “tough it out” by ignoring these early warnings. This is a great time to come in for treatment. Acupuncture stimulates the immune system response, reduces stress, inflammation and alleviates symptoms such as runny nose, sneezing, itchy eyes and nose, nasal congestion and interrupted sleep due to all of the above (1). This creates the conditions for your body to stop the cycle of inflammation, creating a window of opportunity for the body to repair itself and avoid the deeper depths of the
next phase.
Treatment plan suggestion: acupuncture twice a week for four to six weeks for optimal results.

Second stage: Desperation. Help! All of a sudden, my head/chest/throat/ sinuses are painful, inflamed, phlegm-sodden fonts of misery. Am I developing pneumonia? Am I now a public health hazard?
Acupuncture solution: Let an acupuncturist soothe your body and mind. This is a tricky time, when the couch or bed becomes magnetic and a box of tissues, tea and sleep are often prioritized over seeing a medical provider. There may also be concern that one has become infectious. Have no fear, acupuncturists are here to treat you at your most miserable and possibly infectious states. In the acute stage of allergy-induced illness, acupuncture can offer startlingly effective pain relief, reduce the proinflammatory neuropeptides and cytokines that are making mischief in the mucosal tissues, and help clear the nasal passages (1). It can help the storm pass more quickly and give you an hour of much-needed rest during the treatment itself. An acupuncturist can also confirm whether a visit to urgent care is needed in cases such as bacterial infection and severe respiratory distress.
Treatment plan suggestion: every two to three days for three visits during the acute phase, including herbal formula prescription and cupping.
Third-Fifth stages: Denial, Amnesia, and Accommodation. The storm may have passed, but the waters are still choppy. Living on steroidal inhalers and antihistamines can’t hurt, can it? Shall I mow the lawn and just assume that I will generally feel more tired and foggy headed for the next three months?
Acupuncture solution: This is the absolute best time to come in for acupuncture. Patch the roof when the sun is out, rather than when you’re reminded of the leaky roof in the middle of the storm. According to Chinese medical theory, one should treat seasonal diseases two seasons ahead. So if you have stronger symptoms in the spring and summer, start getting acupuncture weekly in the fall and winter. This helps diminish the severity and frequency of allergy symptoms during the high season, and your acupuncturist can also recommend things to do at home in the meantime to support your body’s immune system. Try using diet and herbs, lifestyle adjustments, acupressure self-massage and other tools for stress relief such as meditation, which has been shown to activate the anti-inflammatory and immune system response. Could this be the original form of biohacking?
Ultimately, acupuncture should be considered as a first-line treatment for the discomfort of acute seasonal allergies, a medical tool to prevent flare-ups of allergies, and as a source of biohack information using herbs, diet, meditation and self-massage to improve well-being year-round.

Sources: McDonald, J. et. al. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Acupuncture and Their Relevance to Allergic Rhinitis: A Narrative Review and Proposed Model. Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 591796, 12 pages


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