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Saturday Evening Post

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Gloomy days often make great covers. http://bit.ly/1ziJtqn
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Saturday Evening Post

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Play Ball! Baseball season is here, check out baseball cover collection: http://bit.ly/1a5AcLL
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Saturday Evening Post

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A collection of our favorite #Easter covers from the archive is now online: http://bit.ly/1xzfVsX
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Saturday Evening Post

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It's time for Tuesday's Cover! This week is a 1938 cover by Frances Tipton Hunter. The cover was titled, "Birthday Kiss." This illustrator worked for the Post from the 1920-1950s.

For more, see our website! http://bit.ly/15T1weL
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Saturday Evening Post

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We don't know about you, but we feel much like this travel agent in Tuesday's Cover! We're dreaming of sun and warmer weather.

Constantin Alajálov illustrated this cover in 1949. To see more of his most famous covers for the Post, check out our site: http://bit.ly/1FUj4BK
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Saturday Evening Post

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Tuesday's Cover! 60 years ago this Post cover by Ben Kimberly Prins hit the stands. How many of you are snowed in this week?

Ben Prins' work from 1958 was just used on our July/Aug 2014 cover of the Post, check it out here! http://bit.ly/1CJ0Nv9
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Saturday Evening Post

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To celebrate two-time Great American Fiction Contest finalist Stephen G. Eoannaou's new short-story collection "Muscle Cars," we're featuring his short story from our 2013 fiction contest on our homepage. "The Wolf Boy of Forest Lawn" tells the story of a teacher who learns valuable lessons when one of his students goes missing. 
After a young boy goes missing, his teacher and classmates learn a lesson about myths, education, and the danger of secret agendas.
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Saturday Evening Post

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Take a Sunday stroll through our baseball cover collection: http://bit.ly/1DUJlER

(Cover: Yogi Berra Earl Mayan April 20, 1957)
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Saturday Evening Post

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Hop to it! Check out the #Easter art on our website: http://bit.ly/1MUalZ9.
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Saturday Evening Post

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The artist born George Melvin Erickson created covers under the "brush" name Eugene Iverd: http://bit.ly/1y7JIUt
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Saturday Evening Post

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Tuesday's Cover! Nothing gets by this little dog as he chases a man stealing a pie. The cover, "Fleeing Hobo" was done by the Norman Rockwell in 1928.

Like this cover? Buy a print of it here at art.com! http://bit.ly/1w5KOUW
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Saturday Evening Post

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Happy Valentine's Day! Spread some love to your family and friends on this special day.

Cover: Feb. 11, 1956 by Richard Sargent
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Have them in circles
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The oldest magazine in the U.S., tracing its lineage back to Benjamin Franklin.
Introduction

The grand legacy of The Saturday Evening Post has endured for nearly 300 years in part due to the creativity and innovation of its founders, publishers, editors and cover artists. The rich history of the Post has been thoughtfully reaching its readers since a time before America yet existed.

The story of The Saturday Evening Post begins with Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, first published in 1728, and became known as The Saturday Evening Post in 1821. Initially it was four-page newspaper with no illustrations that daringly tackled political controversy. In 1839, editor George Rex Graham dedicated the publication to morality and various commercial interests. By 1855 the Saturday Evening Post had an impressive circulation of 90,000 copies per year.

The modern era of The Saturday Evening Post began in 1897 when famed magazine publisher, Cyrus H. K. Curtis, purchased the magazine for one thousand dollars. Curtis, who also founded The Ladies Home Journal, was well aware of the distinguished legacy of the publication. The legendary George Horace Lorimer, who served as editor from 1899-1936, grew The Saturday Evening Post from 2,000 copies sold per year to over three million by the end of his tenure. Under his leadership, The Saturday Evening Post became the first magazine ever to reach 1,000,000 copies sold. It was Lorimer who conceived of changing the cover from appearing as page one of the magazine to a distinct cover featuring artwork or illustrations. His innovation fueled the popularity of magazine advertising as well as the success of The Saturday Evening Post.

Furthering the advent of the magazine cover, The Saturday Evening Post continued to distinguish itself through its cover artwork. These covers, the most famous of which were painted by Norman Rockwell, connected readers intimately with the magazine as a whole. Americans everywhere recognized the art of the Post and eagerly awaited the next issue because of it. On the editorial side, The Saturday Evening Post featured short stories and commentary by such famous authors as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sinclair Lewis, Ring Lardner, and many others. Other notable cover illustrators include J.C. Leyendecker, N.C. Wyeth, Charles Livingston Bull, and John E. Sheridan.

In the 1950’s, television’s popularity posed a major challenge to the magazine, and by 1969 The Saturday Evening Post briefly ceased circulation. In 1971, however, it found a new owner and was re-introduced with a focus on health and medical breakthroughs by the Benjamin Franklin Literary & Medical Society.

Having been at the side of Americans in various forms since 1728, through the events and cultural shifts that have shaped the country’s character, The Saturday Evening Post remains America’s Magazine.