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Du Hoang
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Du Hoang

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Creative accounting by Olympus could really hurt Japan's national brand. What a tragic episode. So many innocent people got hurt.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/08/us-olympus-idUSTRE7A702X20111108
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Du Hoang's profile photoMax Hodges's profile photoAlfie Goodrich's profile photo
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Woodford appears to make a return to Olympus. I saw his interview at Reuters. He is making a comeback. This is not over. The whole board must be removed. Period.

This is not unique to Japan. Look what happened at Penn St. Joe Paterno is a great man but he did cover up the sex scandal for decades. Wall Street banks did the same and sold CDS knowing it was not AAA. Conformity is a powerful drive.
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Actually, I do agree with you in general, +Ana Paula . The transitional period is painful (30-40 years). Let hope the US (not China) is smart enough to advance the human race instead of chanting war mantra like General Buck Turgidson (Dr. Strangelove). We have to get everyone out of poverty and into middle class (for our sake).

Playing with global food supply and subsidize agricultural sector are dangerous games. They create resentment and fuel war.
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Bacterial Computer
Marinko Stevanovic originally shared:
 
The research builds on previous work by the same team, who last year created a bacterial computer to solve the Burnt Pancake Problem. This unusually named conundrum is a mathematical sorting process that can be visualised as a stack of pancakes, all burnt on one side, which must be ordered by size.
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It’s Not China; It’s Efficiency That Is Killing Our Jobs

http://dyske.com/paper/945
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Quyen Kiet's profile photoDu Hoang's profile photoAna Paula's profile photoQuoc Anh Trinh's profile photo
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I actually do not think that technology will kill jobs... it will make some human intervention in some services obsolete but it will create new markets, new opportunities. What has been killing our jobs is a lot of effort in maintaining the status quo and bleed the system as much as possible.

A simple example (that you know I am particularly fond of) : alternative energy. For decades leaders have been talking about (for all sorts of reasons) reducing our dependence on oil. Nixon talked about it... it has met resistance from those who profit from oil (and they are wealthy and powerful)... that will create jobs, that will create new sources of wealth, that will create new industries. Considering this example http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/car-company-us-loan-builds-cars-finland/story?id=14770875 it may be too late for the US.

Lack of efficiency kills economies... look at some of the structural problems of Greece and Portugal and you see this. Some of the things that happen there seems surreal. Even here in the US, how many companies had the guy with the fancy title (and high pay) but no one really knew what he did. Then you have a boom of managers with great degrees that are put in front of businesses and industries they know nothing about, but they have this general managing degree and the more incompetent (and arrogant ones) refuse to believe they need to know much about specific industries and the markets they are meant to cater to. Lack of efficiency and oversight and accountability creates the problems that you have on Wall Street today.

It is a time of change, our excesses, our arrogance caught up with us. It is also a time to re-invent ourselves. We are... it is a slow painful process but we are.

eta: and this one (you have probably seen it before) http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevedenning/2011/08/17/why-amazon-cant-make-a-kindle-in-the-usa/
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Have them in circles
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Du Hoang

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If I were from 2106 I should know the Nasdaq's trend for next week. Haven't a clue. Maybe I am just a cheap Chinese robot from 2106, whose crappy existence is centered around chess and soccer, lazy with art and writing scenario. At least Doraemon can fly and look cute.

Really, I haven't paid attention to physicists for the longest time. These guys always get it wrong. I read the only the controversial or most eccentric ones: Hugh Everett, David Bohm, Brian Greene, Thomas Kuhn.
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This is why financial crisis in Europe can't be solved in the near term. It is a cultural issue as well. Germany will have a difficult time to iron the wrinkles and contain the contagion.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/11/01/us-greece-referendum-idUSTRE79U5PQ20111101
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Steve Jobs 1996 interview with Terry Gross

Jonathan Ive (chief designer at Apple) accused Steve Jobs stole his ideas. Ive also praised Jobs:
In so many other companies, ideas and great design get lost in the process," Ive said. "The ideas that come from me and my team would have been completely irrelevant, nowhere, if Steve hadn't been here to push us, work with us, and drive through all the resistance to turn our ideas into products.

http://www.npr.org/2011/10/25/141653658/steve-jobs-a-computer-icon-on-life-death-and-apple
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Yes, Jimmy Wales & Tim Berners-Lee deserve much credit. History will praise them to no end, especially the former for disrupting knowledge and empower poor people.

I'm not sure what to say. We're on the same side here.
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So, yes, open access is cheaper. Stupidly cheaper. Absurdly, ridiculously, appallingly cheaper. ~ Mike Taylor

http://svpow.wordpress.com/2011/10/22/economics-of-open-source-publishing/
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Good ideas come from collision of small hunches...

WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM by Steven Johnson
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Have them in circles
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art. cinema. investing.
Introduction
Interests: art, cinema & investing.

I'm operating in finance, art and entertainment media. 

next venture: MoSaigon Art Fund.

Some people I wish I could have met:
Chuang Tzu, Hayao Miyazaki, Hiroshi Shimizu, Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujiro Ozu, Wong Kar-wai, Rumi, Apichatpong Weerasethaku, Robert Johnson, Mu Qi, Liang Kai.

Favorite Artists
:Diego Velazquez, Mu Qi, Rembrandt, Liang Kai, Paul Cezanne, Francis Bacon, Bernini. 

Favorite Directors
: Yasujiro Ozu, Kenji Mizoguchi, Hiroshi Shimizu, Krzysztof Kieślowski, Jean Godard, Jean Renoir, Alain Resnais, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Andrei Tarkovsky, Robert Bresson, Wong Kar-wai, Seijun Suzuki, Carl Dreyer, Stanley Kubrick, Jacques Tourneur, Alfred Hitchcock, Apichatpong Weerasethaku, Hayao Miyazaki.

Favorite Music: 
Bach, Beethoven, Louis Armstrong, Robert Johnson, Tom Waits, Bjork, Mogwai, Radiohead, Dmitri Shostakovich, Johann Strauss. 

Favorite Writers
: K. Abe, Aeschylus, Borges, Balzac, Cormac McCarthy, Gogol, James Joyce, Kafka, Molière, Mann, Mishima, Marguerite Duras, Marquez, Pynchon, R. Bolaño, Saramago, Shakespeare, Shikibu, H. G. Wells . 

Social Network: Quora is my main dish. You can find me there. Facebook feels like high school prison. Twitter is useful for news but I haven't tweeted since last year.
Bragging rights
hedonist, hustler & homer.