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Jason CranfordTeague
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Temporal Design Thinking & Trust by Design
Temporal Design Thinking & Trust by Design

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What is a Dyson Sphere? They are likely in humanity’s future, if we can survive that long.

http://bit.ly/2l7aLkK
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Chris Hawkins - A Brief History of Goth - @bbc6music
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Floating Water Bridge

When a high voltage is applied across two beakers filled with deionized water a phenomenon known as an electrohydrodynamic bridge can occur. The unsupported strand of water appears to defy gravity as the beakers are slowly separated. First demonstrated in 1893 by Sir William Armstrong, the floating water bridge has yet to be fully explained despite involving a number of important water science concepts.

The polar molecule water (H2O) has a permanent dipole moment and therefore acts as a dielectric fluid because it can be polarized in the presence of an applied electric field. The macroscopic behavior of the polarized fluid is governed by electrohydrodynamics, which describes several phenomena that occur as the magnitude of the electric field increases. These include an increase in meniscus height (electrowetting), bulk fluid circulation (Sumoto effect), and the ejection of charged droplets (electrospray). The electric field also exerts a force known as dielectrophoresis on the water molecules, which causes water to flow across the bridge and is likely involved in holding the stream together.

While this particular demonstration was performed using deionized water, any polar dielectric fluid could be used instead (e.g. glycerol or DMSO).

Source: https://youtu.be/2RSr2pHJJ98
Learn More: https://doi.org/10.3791/51819 (JoVE)

#ScienceGIF #Science #GIF #Water #Voltage #Beaker #Bridge #Floating #Electrohydrodynamic #Electric #Hydrodynamic #Physics #Molecules #Polarity #Electricity
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Traditional solar cells harvest only a narrow sliver of the electromagnetic energy pouring down onto Earth, and that’s one of the reasons it’s been so challenging to get solar efficiency beyond 20-30 percent.
A team of researchers from George Washington University has devised a new layered solar panel that can absorb light from a wider range of the spectrum, pushing the efficiency as high as a stunning 44.5 percent. This could be one of the most efficient solar cell in the world, if all goes as planned.
These panels won’t look like the standard photovoltaics you see on roofs or in open solar farms. They are based on concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) panels, which uses a lens or reflector to focus sunlight on a smaller surface area. CPV can make solar power generation more efficient and cheaper since the panels don’t have to be as big.
The current record for solar efficiency is 46 percent, which made use of a CPV panel design. In the case of the new study, the team is targeting a panel that’s less than one millimeter square.

What really makes this new design potentially revolutionary is the way cells are stacked on top of each other.
Each layer is used to absorb a specific wavelength of light, allowing others to pass through to be collected further down.
Most of the solar energy falling on Earth has wavelengths of wavelengths of 250nm to 2500nm. Specifically, this layered cell is much better at collecting those longer wavelengths of light into the infrared.
Those have less energy than shorter wavelengths, but there’s a lot of it. The current record-holder design maxes out at 1750nm, so the George Washington University team has room to grow.

There are two different materials used in the construction of the cells to accomplish this. The upper layers are composed of conventional photovoltaic substrates, which are adept at capturing shorter wavelengths of light.
Below that, the team used an advanced GaSb-based material in the cells that can absorb energy from longer wavelengths. Additionally, the stacking procedure uses what’s known as transfer printing, which allows the layers to be easily lined up and assembled for maximum performance.
New solar panel technology is notoriously difficult to implement in real life. The main drawback right now is the very high cost of this stacked solar cell. It’s not effective from a cost standpoint, but the cost of materials and manufacturing will be reduced in the future.
The 44.5 percent efficiency rating may be boosted with additional refinements as well.
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I'm Looking for Product/Project Management groups & organizations that would be interested in a Quickstart Design Thinking Workshop.

This could be either half a day or a full day introduction to help product creators hone their skills for finding innovative solutions to stubborn product problems.

If you know of any groups or companies that need this training, please let me know.

DETAILS» http://cranfordteague.com/speaking/workshops-2/
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cranfordteague.com
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‪Just finished my 49th trip around the sun ☀️ 🌎!‬
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23 science fiction and fantasy novels to read this March - The Verge
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