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Bryan Cochrane
Works at Imperial College London
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Bryan Cochrane

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The annual Reddit London Social Club Halloween party is back, and better than ever!

This is just a tracker event for your Google Calendar, please post in the rLSC thread here:
http://www.reddit.com/r/LondonSocialClub/comments/2guqhc/251014_halloween_party_the_telegraph_moorgate/

Highlights:
- Newer larger Pub in Moorgate with a late license
- Live band from the SocialJamClub, playing covers and mashups
- A pool of Lego to play with!
- Crafts area for face painting and making ghost lanterns
- Costume Competition with pointless prizes
- The Bake off is making a return!
- The spare costume bags will be available for the unprepared

As always, if you have an idea or want to contribute in anyway get in touch with one of the listed hosts, and of course everyone is welcome!

Also, if you want to make a ghost lantern bring an empty Milk Bottle on the night (I'll supply the sharpies and glowsticks)
LSC Halloween
Sat, October 25, 2014, 6:00 PM GMT+1
Moorgate

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Bryan Cochrane

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CISCO UCS is it any good?
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Bryan Cochrane

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10 Things You Should Never Say To A Photographer

Oh I love this profession :)
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Bryan Cochrane

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Linux on an 8-bit micro? Intro. It is common to see newbies asking in microcontroller forums if they can run Linux on their puny little 8-bit micro. The results are usually laughter. It is also common...
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Bryan Cochrane

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Congratulations to everyone who decided to keep 1000 BTC in your wallets, you are now millionaires!
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El Bell
 
Dip it in cement
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This VAT page is a good example of a design that results from thinking about user needs. Most people will arrive at this page after a search for VAT rates. The answer most people are after is 20%, so ...
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This has the potential to be amazing!
Yikes, quite a statement! For the past 6 months we’ve been travelling around conferences talking about juju and charms. We’ve had charm …
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Kitchen Science - Measure the speed of light with chocolate buttons!

For this experiment you will need:
- 1 bag of chocolate buttons (plus a spare incase the first mysteriously disappears
- 1 Microwave (often found in the kitchen)
- 1 Non-metallic board
- 1 Pen, paper, ruler and a calculator. :)

The instructions are found on each photograph as are as follows:

Step 1. Arrange chocolate buttons on non-metallic board. Ideally board just smaller that internal area of microwave.
Step 2. Make sure the buttons are closely packed to not leave many open areas.
Step 3a. Prepare the microwave. We do not want the chocolate buttons board to rotate like things inside the microwave normally do so remove the top plate and flip over.
Step 3b. Here is the microwave plate flipped... see the bumps? Those connect with the rotating part when on the bottom so if we have them on the top with the spacer ring still in then it shouldn't rotate. Feel free to improvise with your own microwave (and the help of an adult).
Step 4. Place the chocolate button board in the microwave and zap it for about 25-40 second, depending on your microwave power, until you see areas of melting.
Step 5. Poke to work out the centre of the melted bits and then measure the distance between two melted bits.
Step 6. Read off the frequency of you oven... here this oven is 2450 MHz. MHz means mega hertz and this number means that the waves complete a cycle 2 450 000 000 times every second!
Step 7. Inside the microwave you have standing waves which simply oscillate up and down. The chocolate melts earlier at the anti-nodes shown in the photo. The distance in between the melty bits is equal to have a wavelength. So we multiply this distance by two and have the wavelength of our microwaves. (need so be in units as metres rather than centimeters.)
Step 8. Now you need a calculator (I used my phone). Now you have the wavelength in metres (twice the distance measured) you need to multiply that by the frequency you took from the microwave label.. Remember that MHz means you add six zeros to the back of the number. My calculation is shown here and you can see how close i got to the accurately measured value for the speed. Have a go!
Step 9. Always clean up after your science experiments.. Nom! ;)

Have fun!

#sciencesunday
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