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Frank Krueger
Works at Krueger Systems, Inc.
Attended Rochester Institute of Technology
Lives in Seattle, WA
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Frank Krueger

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Dear Eligear (+Eli Black-Mizuta),

I need this armor. Please find it for me.
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The best photo I've seen. It would seem that "gendarmerie" is printed right on them... hope that doesn't mean they're custom jobs...

http://img.romerican.com/post070614_gendarme_riot_police_gayfest_2007_in_bucuresti_romania.jpg
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Frank Krueger

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I remember last June like it was yesterday. Broke, tired, lawsuit by CBS threatened, couldn't juggle...

And then one day Kelly agreed that I should work on crazy app for the iPad: iCircuit. Thank you for supporting me and changing my life. Thank you to Rahul for forcing me to take a risk. Thank you to Reuben for supporting me those many years of trial and error. Thank you Geoff for always helping me when I was most distressed. Thanks to Eric for pushing me to improve the app. And thanks to all my other friends who let me blabber about whether content creation apps have a place on the iPad. I couldn't have done it without you. And, finally, thanks to the guys at Xamarin who inspired me to take on big projects and gave me the tools to do it.

http://blog.xamarin.com/2011/10/26/java-to-ipad-in-2-months/
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Oh +Eli Black-Mizuta, you'll get credit. It will just be in the form of a court order.
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Frank Krueger

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Picard's best speech (1 sentence only) starts at 1:10. This is why he was a far better captain than Kirk. Star Trek TNG s03e04 - Who Watches The Watchers part 3
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Seriously.
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Frank Krueger

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Glucose originally shared:
 
Amazing short: Portal LIVE ACTION
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Hah this is pretty sweet.
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Frank Krueger

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Glucose originally shared:
 
For a post I'm doing...

Do you feel like a phony in your profession sometimes? Does that motivate or demotivate?

Tell me your stories!
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Frank Krueger

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Joe Devon originally shared:
 
I prefer the old Internet, the one where a Dave Winer creates the RSS protocol, and blogging services are built on top of it. We were able to switch from the dominant player, Movable Type, to Wordpress, when we stopped liking MT's terms.

New players are allowed in, like Tumblr. Life is good.

They all play well together, to this day.

Email was similarly powerful. And many companies thrived.

Now we have Facebook, Twitter, Google+. Closed services built on top of proprietary protocols and ever changing APIs.

See #4, which contrary to opinions on that thread, is a BAD thing: https://plus.google.com/110318982509514011806/posts/J7MUo5h94DZ

How hard is it to make an RSS style protocol w/ 140 char limits for quick messages, hooks for longer posts, and notifications?

It's not too late. Hopefully + will adopt technologies that Google itself has created, e.g. Webfinger.

But we don't need another social network unless it's open and built ON TOP of an open protocol.

Until they make it so…just say NO.
Here's +Joseph Smarr in an interview about G+ -- glad to see him talking again. (I first became aware of Smarr, a Google engineer, when he answered…
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Frank Krueger

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Glucose originally shared:
 
Priorities in Portland: 
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Frank Krueger

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Guy Kawasaki originally shared:
 
(Sat01) What I Learned From Steve Jobs

Many people have explained what one can learn from Steve Jobs. But few, if any, of these people have been inside the tent and experienced first hand what it was like to work with him. I don’t want any lessons to be lost or forgotten, so here is my list of the top twelve lessons that I learned from Steve Jobs.

Experts are clueless.

Experts—journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus can’t “do” so they “advise.” They can tell you what is wrong with your product, but they cannot make a great one. They can tell you how to sell something, but they cannot sell it themselves. They can tell you how to create great teams, but they only manage a secretary. For example, the experts told us that the two biggest shortcomings of Macintosh in the mid 1980s was the lack of a daisy-wheel printer driver and Lotus 1-2-3; another advice gem from the experts was to buy Compaq. Hear what experts say, but don’t always listen to them.

Customers cannot tell you what they need.

“Apple market research” is an oxymoron. The Apple focus group was the right hemisphere of Steve’s brain talking to the left one. If you ask customers what they want, they will tell you, “Better, faster, and cheaper”—that is, better sameness, not revolutionary change. They can only describe their desires in terms of what they are already using—around the time of the introduction of Macintosh, all people said they wanted was better, faster, and cheaper MS-DOS machines. The richest vein for tech startups is creating the product that you want to use—that’s what Steve and Woz did.

Jump to the next curve.

Big wins happen when you go beyond better sameness. The best daisy-wheel printer companies were introducing new fonts in more sizes. Apple introduced the next curve: laser printing. Think of ice harvesters, ice factories, and refrigerator companies. Ice 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. Are you still harvesting ice during the winter from a frozen pond?

The biggest challenges beget best work.

I lived in fear that Steve would tell me that I, or my work, was crap. In public. This fear was a big challenge. Competing with IBM and then Microsoft was a big challenge. Changing the world was a big challenge. I, and Apple employees before me and after me, did their best work because we had to do our best work to meet the big challenges.

Design counts.

Steve drove people nuts with his design demands—some shades of black weren’t black enough. Mere mortals think that black is black, and that a trash can is a trash can. Steve was such a perfectionist—a perfectionist Beyond: Thunderdome—and lo and behold he was right: some people care about design and many people at least sense it. Maybe not everyone, but the important ones.

You can’t go wrong with big graphics and big fonts.

Take a look at Steve’s slides. The font is sixty points. There’s usually one big screenshot or graphic. Look at other tech speaker’s slides—even the ones who have seen Steve in action. The font is eight points, and there are no graphics. So many people say that Steve was the world’s greatest product introduction guy..don’t you wonder why more people don’t copy his style?

Changing your mind is a sign of intelligence.

When Apple first shipped the iPhone there was no such thing as apps. Apps, Steve decreed, were a bad thing because you never know what they could be doing to your phone. Safari web apps were the way to go until six months later when Steve decided, or someone convinced Steve, that apps were the way to go—but of course. Duh! Apple came a long way in a short time from Safari web apps to “there’s an app for that.”

“Value” is different from “price.”

Woe unto you if you decide everything based on price. Even more woe unto you if you compete solely on price. Price is not all that matters—what is important, at least to some people, is value. And value takes into account training, support, and the intrinsic joy of using the best tool that’s made. It’s pretty safe to say that no one buys Apple products because of their low price.

A players hire A+ players.

Actually, Steve believed that A players hire A players—that is people who are as good as they are. I refined this slightly—my theory is that A players hire people even better than themselves. It’s clear, though, that B players hire C players so they can feel superior to them, and C players hire D players. If you start hiring B players, expect what Steve called “the bozo explosion” to happen in your organization.

Real CEOs demo.

Steve Jobs could demo a pod, pad, phone, and Mac two to three times a year with millions of people watching, why is it that many CEOs call upon their vice-president of engineering to do a product demo? Maybe it’s to show that there’s a team effort in play. Maybe. It’s more likely that the CEO doesn’t understand what his/her company is making well enough to explain it. How pathetic is that?

Real CEOs ship.

For all his perfectionism, Steve could ship. Maybe the product wasn’t perfect every time, but it was almost always great enough to go. The lesson is that Steve wasn’t tinkering for the sake of tinkering—he had a goal: shipping and achieving worldwide domination of existing markets or creation of new markets. Apple is an engineering-centric company, not a research-centric one. Which would you rather be: Apple or Xerox PARC?

Marketing boils down to providing unique value.

Think of a 2 x 2 matrix. The vertical axis measures how your product differs from the competition. The horizontal axis measures the value of your product. Bottom right: valuable but not unique—you’ll have to compete on price. Top left: unique but not valuable—you’ll own a market that doesn’t exist. Bottom left: not unique and not value—you’re a bozo. Top right: unique and valuable—this is where you make margin, money, and history. For example, the iPod was unique and valuable because it was the only way to legally, inexpensively, and easily download music from the six biggest record labels.

Bonus: Some things need to be believed to be seen. When you are jumping curves, defying/ignoring the experts, facing off against big challenges, obsessing about design, and focusing on unique value, you will need to convince people to believe in what you are doing in order to see your efforts come to fruition. People needed to believe in Macintosh to see it become real. Ditto for iPod, iPhone, and iPad. Not everyone will believe—that’s okay. But the starting point of changing the world is changing a few minds. This is the greatest lesson of all that I learned from Steve.
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Frank Krueger

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What happened to Goog's quick iterations on G+? Has anything changed since launch? Oh, aside from hate banning people for not using Disney names?
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Frank Krueger

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Vic Gundotra originally shared:
 
Icon Ambulance

One Sunday morning, January 6th, 2008 I was attending religious services when my cell phone vibrated. As discreetly as possible, I checked the phone and noticed that my phone said "Caller ID unknown". I choose to ignore.

After services, as I was walking to my car with my family, I checked my cell phone messages. The message left was from Steve Jobs. "Vic, can you call me at home? I have something urgent to discuss" it said.

Before I even reached my car, I called Steve Jobs back. I was responsible for all mobile applications at Google, and in that role, had regular dealings with Steve. It was one of the perks of the job.

"Hey Steve - this is Vic", I said. "I'm sorry I didn't answer your call earlier. I was in religious services, and the caller ID said unknown, so I didn't pick up".

Steve laughed. He said, "Vic, unless the Caller ID said 'GOD', you should never pick up during services".

I laughed nervously. After all, while it was customary for Steve to call during the week upset about something, it was unusual for him to call me on Sunday and ask me to call his home. I wondered what was so important?

"So Vic, we have an urgent issue, one that I need addressed right away. I've already assigned someone from my team to help you, and I hope you can fix this tomorrow" said Steve.

"I've been looking at the Google logo on the iPhone and I'm not happy with the icon. The second O in Google doesn't have the right yellow gradient. It's just wrong and I'm going to have Greg fix it tomorrow. Is that okay with you?"

Of course this was okay with me. A few minutes later on that Sunday I received an email from Steve with the subject "Icon Ambulance". The email directed me to work with Greg Christie to fix the icon.

Since I was 11 years old and fell in love with an Apple II, I have dozens of stories to tell about Apple products. They have been a part of my life for decades. Even when I worked for 15 years for Bill Gates at Microsoft, I had a huge admiration for Steve and what Apple had produced.

But in the end, when I think about leadership, passion and attention to detail, I think back to the call I received from Steve Jobs on a Sunday morning in January. It was a lesson I'll never forget. CEOs should care about details. Even shades of yellow. On a Sunday.

To one of the greatest leaders I've ever met, my prayers and hopes are with you Steve.

-Vic
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Frank Krueger

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AJ Kohn originally shared:
 
Poll: Do you use Google for Spelling Checking?
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Frank Krueger

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Steve Jobs rejected my app today. I fell to my knees and begged for a second chance, but the knights guard betrayed me and chopped my head off. Wait, did that happen?
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Saw that, congrats!
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In his circles
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95 people
Cynthia Mullen's profile photo
Jen Kirk's profile photo
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Eduardo Scoz's profile photo
Jason Waterman's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Software Developer
Employment
  • Krueger Systems, Inc.
    Software Developer, present
  • Microsoft
    SDE in Test, 2004 - 2005
  • Delphi Harrison Thermal Systems
    Developer, 1998 - 2003
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Seattle, WA
Previously
Lockport, NY - Rochester, NY
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Story
Tagline
Another social network, another one sentence summary of my life. Ge ek. Programmer. Legitimate human being. Single (know anyone?)
Education
  • Rochester Institute of Technology
    Master EE, 1999 - 2004
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Gender
Male