Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Royce Howland
4,512 followers -
Photographer and IT consultant (the balance varies) based in Calgary, Alberta.
Photographer and IT consultant (the balance varies) based in Calgary, Alberta.

4,512 followers
About
Royce's posts

Post has attachment
Here's another photo from my series created while visiting the National Music Centre in Calgary. I love this place... :)
Photo

Post has attachment
Here's a new photo from my on-going series made at the abandoned Brazeau Collieries mine site in Nordegg, Alberta. This is part of the processing plant that made coal briquettes. This piece of equipment here (one of four, in identical production lines) is where everything was brought together prior to feeding the coal "dough" mixture into the actual briquette presses, 2 floors down below. The wood sticks on this one are fallen down from a large crow or raven nest up at the top of the ceiling.
Photo

Post has attachment
A couple more vehicle abstracts from my on-going series at the abandoned coal mine in Nordegg, Alberta. Colour or black & white? Sometimes it's obvious to me which I prefer. Most of this series I have done purely as B&W. But these rusty reds resisted being done away with entirely.

My title for this composition is "Coming Unhinged." And yes, it could be considered political commentary if one was of a mind to do so...
Photo
Photo
3/23/17
2 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
One of the things about the new National Music Centre in Calgary is that there’s something interesting in virtually any direction. On each floor there are several points at which views open up into the layers of interior space. Standing at the railing bars, look across but also don’t forget to look up and look down. Anywhere that light could be coming through, there’s probably something cool to see.
Photo

Post has attachment
The interior of the new National Music Centre in Calgary is dominated by a number of walls shaped by sweeping curves. This creates an overall impression of gracefully flowing forms. However in places these forms are allowed to come to abrupt straight edges, resulting in hard, angular negative spaces… like a sharp knife blade cutting through, revealing another layer behind. Fortunately these knife cuts also allow the light to pour through and bounce around the surfaces, creating a luminous glow on the glazed ceramic tiles of the walls.
Photo

Post has attachment
Before it was the National Music Centre in Calgary, most people who knew of it at all would have known it as the Cantos Music Museum, a smaller operation based in one of Calgary’s remaining early-19th-century buildings. Starting from the earliest genesis of the foundation in the late 1980’s, the key people involved undoubtedly possessed bold visions and the ability to see them through. Possibly even the wildest ideas of that original group would not have envisioned the beautiful, world-class music heritage facility of today and the scope of what the NMC may still become. Bridging from that past starting point to the reality of the present and the potential of the future likely has meant making a number of key leaps of faith, and I hope they keep at it.
Photo

Post has attachment
The new National Music Centre in Calgary is an impressive structure. Built to house and present a wealth of Canadian musical heritage, it is also a quite dazzling showcase of architecture. Flowing lines and shapes intertwine amongst themselves, rising and falling as they are cut through by angular light throughout the day. Numerous vantage points offer good views, but I find in many ways that it is in concentrating on small sections, guided by a highway of light, that the visual impact of the space is at its strongest.
Photo

Post has attachment
Here's another new composition from the National Music Centre in Calgary. Replete with gracefully flowing lines punctuated by the occasional sharply-angled slashing line, the space is a visual feast. Staircases on either side play an important role in appreciating the architecture. Aside from their use as a means of moving between floors and looking out into the main space, the staircases also create openings. The surrounding walls fold over and around these openings, and light from adjacent windows cuts through them, illuminating the interior. When you visit, my advice is to avoid the elevators, and take the stairs.
Photo

Post has attachment
This is a new photograph, made this weekend at the National Music Centre in Calgary. Go for the displays of Canadian musical heritage, stay for the beautiful architecture...
Photo

Post has attachment
Here's a colour version of my previous post. My industrial series is almost exclusively B&W, but every so often I hit a composition where I can't resist doing a colour rendition as well. :)
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded