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Wolfgang Alexander Moens
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A moonbow (also known as a lunar rainbow or white rainbow), is a rainbow produced by moonlight rather than sunlight.

Numerous places in the world feature spray-, fog- or mist-induced bows. In the United States such bows may be seen in relation to various waterfalls including Yosemite National Park, California and Cumberland Falls, near Corbin, Kentucky. Victoria Falls, in Africa on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe and Plitvice Lakes in Croatia is also widely known for spray moonbows.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonbow
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"We need to make it normal to pre-register your methods and analytic strategy before you begin your research.

We need to recognize academic journals for what they are: shop-windows for incomplete descriptions of research, that make semi-arbitrary editorial [judgments] about what to publish, and often have harmful policies that restrict access to important post-publication critical appraisal of published research. We need to ensure that researchers publish their full methods, results, analytic code, and data, regardless of what results they get, in open online repositories. And we need to ensure that this information is properly indexed and discoverable, alongside reviews, critiques, expansions and suggestions contributed by peers, no matter who made them, and no matter what or where those criticisms may be." —Ben Goldacre, epidemiology researcher, physician, and author

"Replication studies should be incentivized somehow, and journals should be incentivized to publish ‘negative’ studies. All results matter, not just the flashy, paradigm shifting results." —Stephanie Thurmond, biology graduate student, University of California Riverside

"Being able to explain your work to a non-scientific audience is just as important as publishing in a peer-reviewed journal, in my opinion, but currently the incentive structure has no place for engaging the public." —Crystal Steltenpohl, PhD student in community psychology, DePaul University

"In the age of the internet and its massive demand for new content, there is huge pressure for journalists who cover science to turn every scientific findings into a ‘big idea’ that will immediately change people's lives. It is almost never the case that any single program of research will do that, and these types of insights or discoveries accumulate over many years." —Daniel Molden, psychology professor, Northwestern University


These are dark times for science so we asked hundreds of researchers how to fix it.
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"The question of how much power the Supreme Court should possess has divided justices over time. But the issue was perhaps never more hotly debated than in Baker v. Carr.

On this episode of *More Perfect,* we talk about the case that pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court – and the nation – forever."
<p>The question of how much power the Supreme Court should possess has divided justices over time. But the issue was perhaps never more hotly debated than in Baker v. Carr. On this episode of More Perfect, we talk about the case that pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court – and the nation – forever.</p>
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These are snippets from the new, post- #Brexit United Kingdom. They are originally from a huge Facebook album, and I am resharing them here because some people can't access that album.

https://www.facebook.com/sarah.leblanc.718/media_set?set=a.10101369198638985&type=3

Now, some of you might think I am posting this to make an "anti-British statement. But really, I am not.

Instead, I want to make a statement how close xenophobia and racism are slumbering under the surface of society, and how easily they can emerge.

Because I suspect... no, I know damn well that the same could happen in my native Germany. There are already significant groups pandering to hate, racism, and intolerance. PEGIDA. The Alternative für Deutschland party. And if more mainstream politicians feel that they must pander to these, baser instincts - if they indicate that displaying xenophobia is something socially acceptable - then racist incidents will surge just as much in Germany as it is now happening in the United Kingdom.

This could be us.
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"The global community has reached a devastating new milestone. According to a report released by the United Nation’s refugee agency this morning, the number of people displaced by conflict at the end of 2015 was the highest ever — even greater than the refugee crisis that followed the Second World War. [...]"

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The global community has reached a devastating new milestone.
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Links:

a. The world has more refugees now than ever before. These 2 graphs help explain why.: http://www.vox.com/2016/6/20/11980588/world-refugee-day-un-report

b. Displaced person: A displaced person (sometimes abbreviated DP) is a person who has been forced to leave his or her home or place of habitual residence, a phenomenon known as forced migration. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displaced_person

c. Global Trends: Forced Displacement in 2015: https://s3.amazonaws.com/unhcrsharedmedia/2016/2016-06-20-global-trends/2016-06-14-Global-Trends-2015.pdf
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Hazard lines: The Fukushima disaster shows why the line between high and low risk is individual. Can we learn to manage our own safety?

"People are understandably concerned about health and safety. They worry about hoverboards that threaten to burst into flames, or a Zika virus infection that could harm their unborn children. They worry ceaselessly about health threats and industrial hazards and accidents that they can do nothing to prevent, and they want their governments to protect them. They want to know: is it safe or not?

But safety isn’t as simple as yes or no, and believing it is can lead us into a false sense of security. Or needless worry. Safety is more nuanced and therefore more problematic, as we are learning now, five years on from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power-plant accident. What is more, the safety issues around Fukushima will have a tremendous impact on us all – not just on the local residents of that Japanese city.

Exposure to any potential hazard involves a certain risk. It’s where we draw the line between high risk and low risk that defines what is safe and what is not. This gives rise to an interesting set of questions. Would everyone draw that line in the same place? Would we draw the same line for ourselves as we would for others? And, would we allow others to draw the line for us?

The radiation protection community has had a lot of experience drawing safety lines ever since 1895, when X-rays were discovered. Those lines have shifted like moveable feasts, as each generation, thinking it knows better, has written over the recommendation of another.

One hundred years ago, women factory workers in New Jersey and Connecticut began painting watch dials with fluorescent paint doped with radioactivity. The radioactivity made the paint glow in the dark, and watches with glowing dials were the latest novelty. Spurred by heavy advertising, watch sales rocketed, and the women found it hard to keep pace with the high demand.

But dial-painting was a risky business. [...]"

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The Fukushima disaster shows why the line between high and low risk is individual. Can we learn to manage our own safety?
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Honeyguides and humans: a wonderful mutualism between our species and a wild bird: "The story of our relationship with the Greater Honeyguide, which has the fantastic species name of Indicator indicator, is well known. The BBC had a segment on it, which is where I learned the story. And the story is this: people in Mozambique and Tanzania use honey as an important part of their diet, but the beehives, hidden in trees, are hard to find.

Enter the Honeyguide, a bird that has the ability to find the nests. This has led, over God knows how many years, to a mutualism between bird and humans. The birds let humans know they’re around by chirping. The honey-hunting humans then make a special bird-summoning sound (in the case of the Yao people, the “brrr-hmm” call you can hear in the video below, but the Hadza people of Tanzania use a different “whistle” call), and that attracts the birds, which then lead the humans to a bees’ nest. As the birds fly ahead, the humans keep making that call, which keeps them aligned with the birds. Finally, the bird stops in the nest area, and, more often than not, the humans find the nest, extracting the honey and most of the honeycomb. The humans leave behind wax (and perhaps some honey) for the birds, which consume it.

So we have here a true mutualism, a wonderful alliance of bird and human that benefits each one. My question, when I first heard the tale, was also asked by a group of biologists: Is is this story true? [...]"

Links below!
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Links:

a. Honeyguides and humans: a wonderful mutualism between our species and a wild bird: https://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com/2016/07/22/honeyguides-and-humans-a-wonderful-mutualism-between-our-species-and-a-wild-bird/ by +Jerry Coyne

b. Honey Guide Bird amazing BBC Documentary by jaandil7 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbgBllWeZ4k

c. Greater honeyguide: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_honeyguide

d. Reciprocal signaling in honeyguide-human mutualism: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/353/6297/387.full 
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"Selecting for one trait, or a small number of them, and failing to recognize that individual organisms must be integrated with their environment, leads to catastrophe, [...]"

"Almost everyone who thought about eugenics at that time unquestionably assumed that creating a better society was a matter of selecting the most able individuals, or “hereditary genius”, as Galton put it. Against this background, consider an experiment conducted in the 1990’s by William M. Muir, Professor of Animal Sciences at Purdue University. The purpose of the experiment was to increase the egg-laying productivity of hens. The hens were housed in cages with nine hens per cage. Very simply, the most productive hen from each cage was selected to breed the next generation of hens.

If egg-laying productivity is a heritable trait, then the experiment should produce a strain of better egg layers, but that’s not what happened. Instead, the experiment produced a strain of hyper-aggressive hens, as shown in the first photograph. There are only three hens because the other six were murdered and the survivors have plucked each other in their incessant attacks. Egg productivity plummeted, even though the best egg-layers had been selected each and every generation.

The reason for this perverse outcome is easy to understand, at least in retrospect. The most productive hen in each cage was the biggest bully, who achieved her productivity by suppressing the productivity of the other hens. Bullying behavior is a heritable trait, and several generations were sufficient to produce a strain of psychopaths.

In a parallel experiment, Muir monitored the productivity of the cages and selected all of the hens from the best cages to breed the next generation of hens. The result of that experiment is shown in the second photograph. All nine hens are alive and fully feathered. Egg productivity increased 160% in only a few generations, an almost unheard of response to artificial selection in animal breeding experiments. [...]"

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Selecting for one trait, or a small number of them, and failing to recognize that individual organisms must be integrated with their environment, leads to catastrophe, as this interview with Bill M…
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There's a depressingly popular "management" technique of ranking all employees and firing the bottom 10% every year. Sometimes this is useful the first year. A couple years in, you get the equivalent of paranoid aggressive bald chickens.
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Ian McKellen offers some context before performing Shakespeare:

"The complaint was about strangers in our midst, and the cry was that they should be removed. The usual complaints about strangers: they eat our foods, speak odd languages, take our jobs, take our houses. Better send them back where they came from [...]"

"[...] This is the strangers’ case;
And this your mountanish inhumanity. [...]"

Links below
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Links:

a. The People Speak, Ian McKellen performancehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjEAeOshUGQ

b. Sir Thomas More Sceneshttps://www.playshakespeare.com/sir-thomas-more/scenes/1193-act-ii-scene-4
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It’s Time to Get Serious About Climate Change. Seriously. (Noam Chomsky):

"[...]  We now know that the world was saved from likely nuclear destruction in those frightening days by the decision of a Russian officer, Stanislav Petrov, not to transmit to higher authorities the report of automated detection systems that the USSR was under missile attack. Accordingly, Petrov takes his place alongside Russian submarine commander Vasili Arkhipov, who, at a dangerous moment of the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, refused to authorize the launching of nuclear torpedoes when the subs were under attack by US destroyers enforcing a quarantine.

Other recently revealed examples enrich the already frightening record. Nuclear security expert Bruce Blair reports that “the closest the US came to an inadvertent strategic launch decision by the President happened in 1979, when a NORAD early warning training tape depicting a full-scale Soviet strategic strike inadvertently coursed through the actual early warning network. National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski was called twice in the night and told the US was under attack, and he was just picking up the phone to persuade President Carter that a full-scale response needed to be authorized right away, when a third call told him it was a false alarm.”

This newly revealed example brings to mind a critical incident of 1995, when the trajectory of a US-Norwegian rocket carrying scientific equipment resembled the path of a nuclear missile. This elicited Russian concerns that quickly reached President Boris Yeltsin, who had to decide whether to launch a nuclear strike.

Blair adds other examples from his own experience. [...]"

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Our dysfunctional political system is now a threat to the existence of all mankind.
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I heard both Carter and Clinton at one point had misplaced the nuclear launch codes so maybe in the last case the world was safe...
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Warning: Do not share the pictures linked to in the comments if you live in Turkey.

"[...] Almost 2,000 cases for insulting Mr Erdogan have been opened in recent years. They include a former Miss Turkey and a 12-year-boy. [...]"


A Turkish man gets a suspended one-year jail term for insulting President Recep Tayyip Erdogan by depicting him as the Gollum character from the Lord of the Rings.
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Calls for figuring out the recipe for turkey that the name "Recep Tayyip Erdogan" means. First thing that comes to mind, is a solar oven based recipe. Louis XIV was called "King Sun". And the mirrors fit the ego. Other ideas?
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