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Wolfgang Alexander Moens
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"When you burn fat, where does it go? Many people, even some doctors, think it’s just “burned up.” But that’s not possible! Find out where your fat really goes!"
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When you delete a file, where does it go?
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"The death of bees explained What’s killing the honeybees? While we’re still untangling the causes, it’s clear that our fates are deeply entwined"
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Great video, thanks for sharing
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The Magnus effect is the commonly observed effect in which a spinning ball (or cylinder) curves away from its principal flight path. It is important in many ball sports. It affects spinning missiles, and has some engineering uses, for instance in the design of rotor ships and Flettner aeroplanes.
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"[...] What killed the trees in the ghost forest was saltwater. It had long been assumed that they died slowly, as the sea level around them gradually rose and submerged their roots. But, by 1987, Atwater, who had found in soil layers evidence of sudden land subsidence along the Washington coast, suspected that that was backward—that the trees had died quickly when the ground beneath them plummeted. To find out, he teamed up with Yamaguchi, a specialist in dendrochronology, the study of growth-ring patterns in trees. Yamaguchi took samples of the cedars and found that they had died simultaneously: in tree after tree, the final rings dated to the summer of 1699. Since trees do not grow in the winter, he and Atwater concluded that sometime between August of 1699 and May of 1700 an earthquake had caused the land to drop and killed the cedars. That time frame predated by more than a hundred years the written history of the Pacific Northwest—and so, by rights, the detective story should have ended there.

But it did not. If you travel five thousand miles due west from the ghost forest, you reach the northeast coast of Japan. As the events of 2011 made clear, that coast is vulnerable to tsunamis, and the Japanese have kept track of them since at least 599 A.D. In that fourteen-hundred-year history, one incident has long stood out for its strangeness. On the eighth day of the twelfth month of the twelfth year of the Genroku era, a six-hundred-mile-long wave struck the coast, levelling homes, breaching a castle moat, and causing an accident at sea. The Japanese understood that tsunamis were the result of earthquakes, yet no one felt the ground shake before the Genroku event. The wave had no discernible origin. When scientists began studying it, they called it an orphan tsunami.

Finally, in a 1996 article in Nature, a seismologist named Kenji Satake and three colleagues, drawing on the work of Atwater and Yamaguchi, matched that orphan to its parent—and thereby filled in the blanks in the Cascadia story with uncanny specificity. At approximately nine o’ clock at night on January 26, 1700, a magnitude-9.0 earthquake struck the Pacific Northwest, causing sudden land subsidence, drowning coastal forests, and, out in the ocean, lifting up a wave half the length of a continent. It took roughly fifteen minutes for the Eastern half of that wave to strike the Northwest coast. It took ten hours for the other half to cross the ocean. It reached Japan on January 27, 1700: by the local calendar, the eighth day of the twelfth month of the twelfth year of Genroku.

Once scientists had reconstructed the 1700 earthquake, certain previously overlooked accounts also came to seem like clues. [...]"
The next full-margin rupture of the Cascadia subduction zone will spell the worst natural disaster in the history of the continent. Credit Illustration by Christoph Niemann; Map by Ziggymaj / Getty
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The Orphan Tsunami of 1700 - Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America

http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/pp1707/pp1707.pdf
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Look up! The billion-bug highway you can’t see

The blue sky might look clear, but thousands of feet overhead countless insects are riding their own mass-transit system ...
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Wolfgang Alexander Moens's profile photoBert Shaw's profile photo
 
Links:

a. Look uphttp://aeon.co/video/science/look-up-the-billion-bug-highway-you-cant-see-insects-aloft/

b. The biometeorology of high-altitude insect layers: Flight at high altitude is part of a migration strategy that maximises insect population displacement. This thesis represents the first substantial analysis of insect migration and layering in Europe [...] by +Curtis Wood http://www.met.rdg.ac.uk/phdtheses/The%20biometeorology%20of%20high-altitude%20insect%20layers.pdf

c. Aeroplanktonhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeroplankton
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What are the Top Ten Ways Science Fiction Fails to Predict the Future?

"In today’s episode we give a comprehensive list of the sci-fi tropes that bother us the most. While not all science fiction has an obligation to be speculative, we would like to see more science fiction that avoids certain cliches when it comes to predicting the future. We discuss the following tropes:

The Prometheus Problem, The Boot-in-the-face Dystopia, Societal, Regression, Super Now, Isolated technological Advancement, The Lone Inventor, Human Specialness, Primacy of the Real, Unnecessary Anthropomorphism,, andThe Sofalarity.

To find out what these terms mean, listen to the episode! [...]"
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"Persepolis is the poignant story of a young girl coming-of-age in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. It is through the eyes of precocious and outspoken nine year old Marjane that we see a people's hopes dashed as fundamentalists take power - forcing the veil on women and imprisoning thousands. Clever and fearless, she outsmarts the "social guardians" and discovers punk, ABBA and Iron Maiden. Yet when her uncle is senselessly executed and as bombs fall around Tehran in the Iran/Iraq war, the daily fear that permeates life in Iran is palpable. [...]"

Links below!
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Links:

a. Persepolis (comics): Persepolis is an autobiographical graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi depicting her childhood up to her early adult years in Iran during and after the Islamic revolution. The title is a reference to the ancient capital of the Persian Empire, Persepolis. Newsweek ranked the book #5 on its list of the ten best fiction books of the decade. Originally published in French, it has been translated into several languages including English. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persepolis_(comics)

b. Persepolis (film): Persepolis is a 2007 French-Iranian-American animated film based on Marjane Satrapi's autobiographical graphic novel of the same name. The film was written and directed by Satrapi with Vincent Paronnaud. The story follows a young girl as she comes of age against the backdrop of the Iranian Revolution. The title is a reference to the historic city of Persepolis. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persepolis_(film)

c. Marjane Satrapihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marjane_Satrapi
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"And a million more kids are dead."
Is genetically engineered food dangerous? Many people seem to think it is. In the past five years, companies have submitted more than 27,000 products to the Non-GMO Project, which certifies goods that are free of genetically modified organisms. Last year, sales of such products nearly tripled. Whole Foods will soon...
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Great post . Thanks +Wolfgang Alexander Moens 
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Utopia: After a group of people, who meet online, discover a bizarre graphic novel which seems to hold mysterious answers, they find themselves being tracked down by a merciless organization known merely as 'The Network'. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utopia_(UK_TV_series)http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2384811/
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awesome series! go watch it if you haven't already :)
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The Moth shares two stories by Afghan refugee Dori Samadzai Bonner:

a. A new home: http://themoth.org/posts/stories/a-new-home

b. Finding home: http://themoth.org/posts/stories/finding-home
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Links:

a. Dori Samadzai : Dori Samadzai-Bonner was born in Afghanistan, in 1977 during the Russian invasion. At the age of nine, Dori and her family escaped to India ultimately hoping to start their journey to the United States. After spending three years in India, life became ever so difficult as money started to run out. Her parents had to take a leap of faith and entrust a smuggler to bring Dori and her brother to America, while her parents would have to return to Afghanistan. On Christmas Eve 1991, Dori and her brother arrived at J.F.K airport speaking the only English words they knew, “We need asylum…” http://www.southalabama.edu/genderstudies/dori.pdf

b. Democratic Republic of Afghanistan: The Democratic Republic of Afghanistan, renamed in 1987 to the Republic of Afghanistan, existed from 1978 to 1992 and covers the period when the communist People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan (PDPA) ruled Afghanistan. The PDPA came to power through a coup known as the Saur Revolution, which ousted the government of Mohammad Daoud Khan.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Republic_of_Afghanistan

c. The Moth: The Moth is a non-profit group based in New York City dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling.[1] Founded in 1997, the organization presents storytelling events across the United States and abroad, often featuring prominent literary and cultural personalities. The Moth offers a weekly podcast and in 2009 launched a national public radio show, The Moth Radio Hour, which won a 2010 Peabody Award. The 2013 story collection The Moth: 50 True Stories reached #22 on The New York Times Paperback Nonfiction Best-Seller List. http://themoth.org/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Moth
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How do you prevent a problem ten thousand years in advance?

"In 1990, the federal government invited a group of geologists, linguists, astrophysicists, architects, artists, and writers to the New Mexico desert, to visit the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. They would be there on assignment.

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the nation’s only permanent underground repository for nuclear waste. Radioactive byproducts from nuclear weapons manufacturing and nuclear power plants. WIPP was designed not only to handle a waste stream of various forms of nuclear sludge, but also more mundane things that interacted with radioactive materials, such as tools and gloves.

WIPP, which is located deep in the New Mexico desert, was designed to store all of this radioactive material and keep us all safe from it.

Eventually, WIPP  will be sealed up and left alone. Years will pass and those years will become decades. Those decades will become centuries and those centuries will roll into millennia. People above ground will come and go. Cultures will rise and fall. And all the while, below the surface, that cave full of waste will get smaller and smaller, until the salt swallows up all those oil drums and entombs them. Then, all the old radioactive gloves and tools and little bits from bombs –all still radioactive– will be solidified in the earth’s crust for more than 200,000 years. Basically forever.

Storing something safely forever is a huge design problem; in fact, the jury’s still out on whether WIPP has solved the basics of the storage problem at all. In February of 2014, a leak was detected at WIPP which exposed several workers to radiation and WIPP has been closed since. The Department of Energy now predicts that it could be up to three years before WIPP is fully operational again.

We know these facts because we can look them up and read the news in a shared language. The problem that the aforementioned panel was convened to address was how to communicate this information to people 10,000 years in the future. [...]"

Links below!
In 1990, the federal government invited a group of  geologists, linguists, astrophysicists, architects, artists, and writers to the New Mexico desert, to visit the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. They...
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Links:

a. Ten Thousand Yearshttp://99percentinvisible.org/episode/ten-thousand-years/ by +Roman Mars.

b. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, or WIPP, is the world's third deep geological repository (after closure of Germany's Repository for radioactive waste Morsleben and the Schacht Asse II Salt Mine) licensed to permanently dispose of transuranic radioactive waste for 10,000 years that is left from the research and production of nuclear weapons. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waste_Isolation_Pilot_Plant

c. Correction: A previous version of this written story stated that beryllium dust contaminated the town of Tallevast’s water supply. While some Tallevast residents  did contract  berylliosis and other ailments from interacting with beryllium dust, this dust  was not responsible for the contamination of Tallevast’s water. Rather, Tallevast’s water was contaminated by a different toxin called Trichloroethylene (TCE), which also originated from the beryllium refining plant.

d. 10​,​000​-​Year Earworm to Discourage Settlement Near Nuclear Waste Repositorieshttp://emperorx.bandcamp.com/album/10000-year-earworm-to-discourage-settlement-near-nuclear-waste-repositories
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It's ironic really ... Marriage is not a religious invention ... we invented Religion in order to try to explain to our kids the Mystery of Marriage ... which . to this day . remains a mystery  :-)
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