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LSEE Research on South Eastern Europe
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South East Europe research unit, London School of Economics
South East Europe research unit, London School of Economics

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[LSEE Blog] South East European countries are now faced with the prospect of rethinking their energy strategy. Options ahead are many but cooperation is essential, argues Julian Popov. “All ingredients for turning the South East Europe into a clean energy generation and storage powerhouse of Europe are there. Political will in and outside the region is the catalyst that is needed”, he writes.
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[LSEE Blog] Russia’s financial support for Transnistria, designed to to buy Moscow political leverage to shape the breakaway state’s foreign policy direction, is at risk of drying up. In spite of a pervasive pro-Russia narrative among locals, the government in Tiraspol is now looking west to foster its economy.
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[LSEE Blog] Russia’s actions in Ukraine should better be ascribed to a quest for domestic legitimacy than an over-arching plan of antagonising the West. But if cornered, Putin could represent a threat to the Baltics, the Balkans and further. LSEE’s Tena Prelec speaks to Konstantin Von Eggert and Nikolay Petrov.
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[LSEE Blog] The pragmatic interests of the Balkan states – which lie in the direction of Europe – are imposing limits on the Kremlin’s drive to regain influence in the region. Dimitar Bechev summarises the Russia in the Balkans conference organised by LSEE Research on South Eastern Europe and SEESOX (South East Europe Studies at Oxford) on Friday, 13 March.
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[LSEE Blog] Milanović government's decision to continue with the policy of fiscal consolidation has overshadowed the initial aim to boost investment - to dismal consequences, argues LSEE’s Will Bartlett. 
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[LSEE Blog] A rapprochement between Serbia and Croatia might well represent a stimulus for growth and normalisation across the Balkans, in a similar fashion to the French-German leadership in driving European integration back in the 1950s. How far are we from a comprehensive settlement? Milan Dinic sets out to discuss.
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