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Breast Cancer Education Association
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Encourage. Engage. Empower.
Encourage. Engage. Empower.

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Every day for the past five weeks Lisa O'Brien lies on a treatment table and holds her breath.

She listens to the low buzzing noise that fills the lead-lined treatment room. Twenty seconds later, the buzzing stops. She waits for the all-clear, and breathes out.

http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/breast-cancer-breathing-technique-reduces-cardiovascular-risk-from-radiotherapy-20170428-gvul1t.html

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For the last few years, we have been hearing more and more about the use of the new 3-D tomosynthesis screening for those with dense breast tissue rather than the traditional 2-D mammography that has been traditionally used.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/3-d-screening-for-breast-cancer_us_58fbd40fe4b0f02c3870eb12

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One in three breast cancer patients under 45 removed the healthy breast along with the breast affected by cancer in 2012, a sharp increase from the one in 10 younger women with breast cancer who had double mastectomies eight years earlier, a new study reports.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/29/well/live/more-women-with-breast-cancer-opt-to-remove-healthy-breast.html?_r=0

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For women who’ve had mastectomies, what to do next is, increasingly, a matter of choice. And what some women are choosing to do may surprise you.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/a-matter-of-choice-mastectomies-without-reconstruction/

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Researchers studied women who, as high schoolers, had consumed diets thought to increase levels of inflammation in the body. Results showed that these women were more likely to develop breast cancer as adults prior to menopause, compared with women who ate a different type of diet as high schoolers.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2017/03/02/how-your-teens-diet-could-affect-her-breast-cancer-risk.html

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Breast cancer patients who eat the most soy foods are also less likely to die early, a new study finds.

Researchers found women who ate the most soy foods were 21 percent less likely to die over 9 ½ years than women who ate the least.

And, contrary to some fears, soy had no bad effects on women with breast cancer fueled by the hormone estrogen, the study found.

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/soy-doesn-t-worsen-breast-cancer-may-prevent-it-study-n729681

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There are no easy answers regarding what should be shared with children as each child is different, one from the other. It is often advisable to have individual conversations with each child involved and address the issues based upon their uniqueness. The other important factor is the age of the child. What is shared with a 5-year-old is not the same as a 12-year-old. Information needs to be tailored to what is needed by each child and their level of understanding and processing.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/breast-cancer-and-the-children_us_58bb4ddce4b02b8b584dfc86
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