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Perry J. Greenbaum
“A Life of Trying to Apprehend the Ways of God and Man”
“A Life of Trying to Apprehend the Ways of God and Man”
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“Rumour is a pipe
Blown by surmises, jealousies, conjectures
And of so easy and so plain a stop
That the blunt monster with uncounted heads,
The still-discordant wavering multitude,
Can play upon it.”
―William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2

All comments ought to reflect the post in question. This stream and all of its Collections are moderated; and inappropriate comments, including those that attack persons, those that use profanity and those that are hateful, will not be tolerated. So, keep it on target, clean and thoughtful. This is not a forum for personal vendettas or to create a toxic environment. The chief idea is to engage, to discuss and to critique issues. Doing so within acceptable norms will make the process more rewarding and healthy for everyone.

Approximating Reality

“So much of what I see and read today approximates reality and appears fake and false, except for the misery. This is more real than anything the news could portray or show. For reality and 'truth' to be found, one has to look in books and at movies, in literature and at films."
—Perry J. Greenbaum, "Notes from the Sixth Floor," February 2017

#news #reality #books #movies #literature #film 

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Coffee Humor

This was hanging on the wall of our favorite coffee hangout, a Second Cup cafe, which is a Canadian coffee chain. There is some truth to advertising, or in this case it rings true. It is a matter of taste.

#coffee #Canada #SecondCup

(c) 2017. Perry J. Greenbaum 
Photo

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SI’s 100 Greatest Moments in Sports History

Lists are always contentious, but in this top 100 ranking Sports Illustrated covers most of the great moments in the history of sport. It is always fun and memorable to look back and remember them. For all kinds of sports fans.

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http://www.si.com/specials/100-greatest/

#sports #SportsIllustrated #top100sportsmoments

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America and Football Viewership

An article, by Eddie Pells, from Associated Press and published in The Christian Science Monitor makes a case that interest in American football and the NFL might be waning in the face of other competitive interests, including from basketball and the NBA. This might be true, but then again it is more than likely that football will always continue to have a strong fan base in the United States for reasons that define the nation.

Football remains a highly popular spectator sport in the U.S.; a point noted in a recent national poll:

"Americans are more likely to say football is their favorite sport to watch. Four-in-ten (40%) Americans say football is their favorite sport to watch, followed by basketball (12%), baseball (11%), and soccer (8%). Among Americans who say they are fans of a particular team, nearly half (49%) say football is their favorite sport." —PRRI, a national public polling firm, [see http://www.prri.org/research/prri-rns-ahead-of-super-bowl-nearly-three-in-ten-americans-support-lifetime-ban-for-football-players-who-commit-domestic-violence/#.VX9FslVViko]

It is true that over-all viewership might decline slightly in the U.S., given the changing demographics of the nation, but the sport will always have a large and significant core fan base who enjoy the particular aspects of the game. This is similar to the way that fans in Canada enjoy hockey.

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More at http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2017/0204/NFL-viewership-decline-Was-2016-a-turning-point-for-fans

Photo:
Richard Vogel; AP

#NFL #football #Americansports #teamsports

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Salamone Rossi’s ‘Songs of Solomon’

The Kuhn Chamber Soloists and Symposium Musicum, under the direction of Pavel Kühn [1938–2003], perform songs from Salamone Rossi’s Songs of Solomon. This is part of a two-CD set, which was released by Panton of the Czech Republic in 1995. It was recorded at Martinek-Studio in Prague, March 24–26 (nos. 1-19), and May 3 and 5, 1994 (nos. 20-33).

Salomone Rossi [1570–1630] was a Jewish violinist and composer employed as concertmaster in the Italian court of Mantua from 1587 to 1628. This collection of Jewish liturgical music—(השירים אשר לשלמה) Ha-shirim asher li-Shlomo, The Songs of Solomon—was published later in life, in 1623. What is unique about this sacred music is that it is performed entirely in the Baroque tradition with no known connection to cantorial tradition and that the biblical “Song of Solomon” does not appear at all in the musical lyrics.

Some Excerpts:
1-1: Qadish
1-3: Bar’ku
1-7: Q’dusha (Keter)
1-8: Elohim Hashivenu
1-12 Shir hamma’alot, ashrei kol y’re adonai
1-16: Qadish: version 2

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More at https://perryjgreenbaum.blogspot.ca/2017/02/salamone-rossis-songs-of-solomon.html

Source: Youtube

#SalamoneRossi #SacredHebrew #SongsofSolomon 
Salamone Rossi’s ‘Songs of Solomon’

The Kuhn Chamber Soloists and Symposium Musicum, under the direction of Pavel Kühn [1938–2003], perform songs from Salamone Rossi’s Songs of Solomon. This is part of a two-CD set, which was released by Panton of the Czech Republic in 1995. It was recorded at Martinek-Studio in Prague, March 24–26 (nos. 1-19), and May 3 and 5, 1994 (nos. 20-33).

Salomone Rossi [1570–1630] was a Jewish violinist and composer employed as concertmaster in the Italian court of Mantua from 1587 to 1628. This collection of Jewish liturgical music—(השירים אשר לשלמה) Ha-shirim asher li-Shlomo, The Songs of Solomon—was published later in life, in 1623. What is unique about this sacred music is that it is performed entirely in the Baroque tradition with no known connection to cantorial tradition and that the biblical “Song of Solomon” does not appear at all in the musical lyrics.

Some Excerpts:
1-1: Qadish
1-3: Bar’ku
1-7: Q’dusha (Keter)
1-8: Elohim Hashivenu
1-12 Shir hamma’alot, ashrei kol y’re adonai
1-16: Qadish: version 2

****************
More at https://perryjgreenbaum.blogspot.ca/2017/02/salamone-rossis-songs-of-solomon.html

Source: Youtube

#SalamoneRossi   #SacredHebrew   #SongsofSolomon  

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Salamone Rossi’s ‘Songs of Solomon’

The Kuhn Chamber Soloists and Symposium Musicum, under the direction of Pavel Kühn [1938–2003], perform songs from Salamone Rossi’s Songs of Solomon. This is part of a two-CD set, which was released by Panton of the Czech Republic in 1995. It was recorded at Martinek-Studio in Prague, March 24–26 (nos. 1-19), and May 3 and 5, 1994 (nos. 20-33).

Salomone Rossi [1570–1630] was a Jewish violinist and composer employed as concertmaster in the Italian court of Mantua from 1587 to 1628. This collection of Jewish liturgical music—(השירים אשר לשלמה) Ha-shirim asher li-Shlomo, The Songs of Solomon—was published later in life, in 1623. What is unique about this sacred music is that it is performed entirely in the Baroque tradition with no known connection to cantorial tradition and that the biblical “Song of Solomon” does not appear at all in the musical lyrics.

Some Excerpts:
1-1: Qadish
1-3: Bar’ku
1-7: Q’dusha (Keter)
1-8: Elohim Hashivenu
1-12 Shir hamma’alot, ashrei kol y’re adonai
1-16: Qadish: version 2

******************
More at https://perryjgreenbaum.blogspot.ca/2017/02/salamone-rossis-songs-of-solomon.html

Source: Youtube

#SalamoneRossi   #SacredHebrew   #SongsofSolomon  

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Ancient Synagogues of Israel: Hukkok

House of Prayer (בית תפילה; Bet Tefila): Synagogues have also long been known as houses of study. chiefly of the ancient sacred Jewish texts; in addition, they have long been the focal point of communal life. Synagogues have existed in Israel for more than two thousand years, including a number that were built before the destruction of the Second Temple. The Galilee and Golan regions of Israel witnessed a boon in synagogue construction in the fourth to sixth centuries C.E. Huqoq (or Hukkok; חוקוק) is the site of an ancient Jewish agricultural village located about six kilometres west of Capernaum and Migdal and 12.5 kilometres north of Tiberias. This particular synagogue is interesting for both its biblical mosaics and its depiction of non-biblical art. Ilan Ben Zion writes, in 2014, for The Times of Israel about the excavation of the Hukkok site led by Jodi Magness, a professor of Early Judaism at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: “Excavations at Huqoq began in 2011, and during the first season archaeologists led by Magness found the wall of a synagogue. In the subsequent seasons, Magness’s team uncovered portions of the Galilean synagogue’s mosaics. The part of the mosaic uncovered this summer, however, stunned archaeologists because it’s the first time they’ve found a synagogue decorated with a non-biblical story scene.” Hukkok is mentioned in the Book of Joshua (19:34).
Photo Credit: Jim Haberman
Source: Live Science

More at https://perryjgreenbaum.blogspot.ca/2017/01/ancient-synagogues-of-israel-hukkok.html


#Israel #synagogues #Hukkok #BetTefila

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Chagall’s Jerusalem Windows

“This is my modest gift to the Jewish people who have always dreamt of biblical love, friendship and of peace among all peoples. This is my gift to that people which lived here thousands of years ago among the other Semitic people.”
—Marc Chagall, February 6, 1962

In the ancient story of the Jewish People, recounted in the Tanakh (תַּנַ"ךְ‎), the Hebrew Bible, the twelve sons of Jacob (also given the name, Israel), are in birth order listed as follows (Genesis 35:23–26): Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, Benjamin. Chagall’s stained glass windows reflect this listing, where the artist note says that he referred to Genesis 49 (Jacob blesses his sons) and Deuteronomy 33 (Moses blesses the 12 tribes of Israel) for inspiration. Blessing is a common theme, but it is more than the blessing of a leader; it is the blessing of a spiritual leader who has gained, after much trial, an intimate relationship with God.

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More at https://perryjgreenbaum.blogspot.ca/2017/01/chagalls-jerusalem-windows.html

#Chagall   #JerusalemWindows  
Chagall’s Jerusalem Windows

“This is my modest gift to the Jewish people who have always dreamt of biblical love, friendship and of peace among all peoples. This is my gift to that people which lived here thousands of years ago among the other Semitic people.”
—Marc Chagall, February 6, 1962

In the ancient story of the Jewish People, recounted in the Tanakh (תַּנַ"ךְ‎), the Hebrew Bible, the twelve sons of Jacob (also given the name, Israel), are in birth order listed as follows (Genesis 35:23–26): Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, Benjamin. Chagall’s stained glass windows reflect this listing, where the artist note says that he referred to Genesis 49 (Jacob blesses his sons) and Deuteronomy 33 (Moses blesses the 12 tribes of Israel) for inspiration. Blessing is a common theme, but it is more than the blessing of a leader; it is the blessing of a spiritual leader who has gained, after much trial, an intimate relationship with God.

As for the small but noticeable discrepancy between the 12 sons and the 12 tribes, one must note that the Bible says that Levi, who was a son of Jacob (through Leah, his wife), received no inheritance of land, since the Levites were a priestly tribe without land who received offerings from the other tribes. Thus, the 12 Tribes are as follows: Reuben, Simeon, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Benjamin, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Ephraim and Manasseh. Ephraim and Manasseh are the sons of Joseph, who were subsequently adopted by Jacob, also known as Israel.

Regardless of the complexity of following and understanding such biblical narratives, they play an important part in the history of the Jewish People, and such is what Marc Chagall offers as an interpretation in these large—each are 11 feet x 8 feet—stained glass windows. They are as beautiful as they are breathtaking. The windows were on display at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York City, from November 19, 1961 to January 3, 1962, before being installed at what was then called Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem on February 6, 1962.


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More at https://perryjgreenbaum.blogspot.ca/2017/01/chagalls-jerusalem-windows.html

Photo
Southern View
Photo Credit & Source: Hadassah Medical Center

#Chagall   #JerusalemWindows   #12TribesofIsrael   #sonsofJacob  

Post has attachment
Chagall’s Jerusalem Windows

“This is my modest gift to the Jewish people who have always dreamt of biblical love, friendship and of peace among all peoples. This is my gift to that people which lived here thousands of years ago among the other Semitic people.”
—Marc Chagall, February 6, 1962

In the ancient story of the Jewish People, recounted in the Tanakh (תַּנַ"ךְ‎), the Hebrew Bible, the twelve sons of Jacob (also given the name, Israel), are in birth order listed as follows (Genesis 35:23–26): Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, Benjamin. Chagall’s stained glass windows reflect this listing, where the artist note says that he referred to Genesis 49 (Jacob blesses his sons) and Deuteronomy 33 (Moses blesses the 12 tribes of Israel) for inspiration. Blessing is a common theme, but it is more than the blessing of a leader; it is the blessing of a spiritual leader who has gained, after much trial, an intimate relationship with God.

As for the small but noticeable discrepancy between the 12 sons and the 12 tribes, one must note that the Bible says that Levi, who was a son of Jacob (through Leah, his wife), received no inheritance of land, since the Levites were a priestly tribe without land who received offerings from the other tribes. Thus, the 12 Tribes are as follows: Reuben, Simeon, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Benjamin, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Ephraim and Manasseh. Ephraim and Manasseh are the sons of Joseph, who were subsequently adopted by Jacob, also known as Israel.

Regardless of the complexity of following and understanding such biblical narratives, they play an important part in the history of the Jewish People, and such is what Marc Chagall offers as an interpretation in these large—each are 11 feet x 8 feet—stained glass windows. They are as beautiful as they are breathtaking. The windows were on display at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York City, from November 19, 1961 to January 3, 1962, before being installed at what was then called Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem on February 6, 1962.


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More at https://perryjgreenbaum.blogspot.ca/2017/01/chagalls-jerusalem-windows.html

Photo
Southern View
Photo Credit & Source: Hadassah Medical Center

#Chagall   #JerusalemWindows   #12TribesofIsrael   #sonsofJacob  
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