Profile cover photo
Profile photo
David Morrell
1,452 followers
1,452 followers
About
Communities and Collections
View all
Posts

Post has attachment
What's wrong with this picture? Some passengers on Southwest Flight 1380 (the one with the exploded engine) put their oxygen masks on wrong. The correct way is over the nose and the mouth. Also some passengers played with their cell phones instead of paying attention to them oxygen masks. At 32,000 feet, the result could have been lethal. (Photo by Marty Martinez, AP)

Here's a link to a USA Today article about listening to flight attendants explain the safety features of an aircraft. I'm a private pilot, and even in my small Cessna 172S, I give a safety briefing to a passenger before we take off. When I finish, the passenger definitely understands what to do in the event of an unplanned landing.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2018/04/18/southwest-1380-oxygen-masks-wrong/530867002/
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I'm fascinated by what happened at the Alamo. For LINE OF GLORY, my author friend Tom Clagett immersed himself in research to dramatize that fateful siege. There were survivors (true), and there was a deserter. Tom draws details from their historical accounts and from those of Mexican soldiers, making me feel I'm behind those battered walls. LINE OF GLORY is compelling and inspiring.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Recently I received an email from someone who was moving from NYC to Tucson, AZ, and had the impression that Santa Fe, NM, had a similar geography. I explained that Tucson was in what's called "low desert" while Santa Fe is in "high desert." We're at 7,000 feet. Here's an example of how green it can be--a photo that I took in a neighbor's backyard last fall.

This is the setting for my upcoming all-day writers' workshop (in Santa Fe, not in my neighbor's backyard). Friday, May 18, It's a rarity. Hands-on detailed page critiques. The workshop focuses on mysteries and thrillers, but the writing principles apply to fiction of any kind.

The event will be offered through Santa Fe Workshops. There’s a fee. This is an intense session in a beautiful location.

https://santafeworkshops.com/workshop/the-world-of-mystery-crime-and-thriller-writing-intensive-2/
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
My Western-watching group recently convened. It was Tom Clagett's turn to bring the selections (Tom is the author of an upcoming, exciting novel about the Alamo, LINE OF GLORY.) He chose an episode from the Nick Adams TV series THE REBEL (1960) and then the 1940 feature film THE WESTERNER, directed by William Wyler (THE BIG COUNTRY), starring Gary Cooper as a drifter and Walter Brennan as hanging Judge Roy Bean (Brennan received his third Oscar for this role).

THE REBEL series (created by legendary Andrew Fennady) is distinguished by Adams' acting and the emphasis on character in the writing. The episode we watched was "Explosion," about nitroglycerin and a hostage situation in a jail.

THE WESTERNER is a 4-star film that somehow I never saw. Director Wyler's work is always interesting, particularly for the performances (lots of long single-camera shots of Cooper and Brennan exchanging quips, some of which might have been improvised). The big fire at the end is one of the best of its kind. The climax is a classic--Brennan enters an empty theater, expecting to see Lily Langtree on stage, only to find Cooper ready to draw on him as the curtain rises, revealing him.

Our group consists of Johnny D. Boggs (whose seven Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America ties those won by Elmer Kelton—read Johnny’s RETURN TO RED RIVER), Tom Clagett (look for his Alamo novel LINE OF GLORY--Tom used to be a film editor who worked on many tv series such as ST. ELSEWHERE), Robert Nott (author of books about Western icons Audie Murphy, Randolph Scott, Joel McCrea, and co-author of Max Evens' memoir about Sam Peckinpah), and Kirk Ellis (Emmy-winning writer/producer of HBO's JOHN ADAMS series and the INTO THE WEST series).
Photo
Photo
4/16/18
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Went to a gas station. After filling the tank, decided to wash the car windows. Couldn't find a windshield washing device in any of the numerous water containers. Asked the attendant, who said, "They get stolen all the time. People steal the paper towels also."
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Last night marked the seventh night of the ALBUQERQUE FBI CITIZENS ACADEMY. I'm proud to be one of 36 New Mexico community representatives who participate in this 9 week event. I'm thrilled to interact with so many people of quality and substance, especially the excellent instructors.

Yesterday's 3 1/2 hour session started with a workshop on how to graph the various elements of a crime--who did what where and when, grouping the elements into categories of "consistent," "inconsistent," and "neutral" under various theories about who committed the crime and how. The group was given a case history of a death that might have been a murder, an accident, or suicide. We had to figure out what happened, based on how we grouped the elements. The most likely hypothesis was the one with the least evidence AGAINST it rather than the hypothesis with the most evidence FOR it. A theory to ponder.

Then we had a lecture from an FBI specialist about Weapons of Mass Destruction. I won't go into a lot of it because, believe me, you don't want to know. But one case study was fascinating. An elderly Albuquerque man died. His relatives arrived to deal with the house he owned. Inside they found what looked like bomb-making equipment everywhere. In every room. In the basement. In the garage. In a storage shed. He also had a geiger counter, which clicked when he turned it on. Turned out he used to work at the Los Alamos lab. After he retired, he decided to continue experimenting. The house contained plutonium, 2 different types of uranium, crystalized sand from where the first atomic bombs were detonated in southern New Mexico in 1945, and various chemicals that, put together, would produce a bomb. If the house caught fire, most of Albuquerque would have needed to be evacuated because of the toxic plume.

Finally, to make our sleep even more restful, we were taught about bomb-making ingredients, many of which can be purchased in a drug store and hardware store. There's a reason why you can't take more than 3 fl oz of various liquids aboard a plane. I'll leave my comment at that.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Here in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on Friday, May 18, I’ll give an all-day hands-on writers workshop that includes page critiques. The workshop focuses on mysteries and thrillers, but the writing principles apply to fiction of any kind, The event will be offered through Santa Fe Workshops. There’s a fee. This is an intense session in a beautiful location. The sign-up deadline is approaching. Here’s a link for the details.

https://santafeworkshops.com/workshop/the-world-of-mystery-crime-and-thriller-writing-intensive-2/
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Mailed the final box of the many Stephen King typescripts that he sent me in the 1980s and that I kept safely until I decided to auction them for the Matt Morrell/Natalie Sanchez Children's Cancer Research fund. This is the box for FOUR PAST MIDNIGHT. The pages totaled over 1,000. 13 pounds. 8 inches tall.

The other typescripts include IT, MISERY, THE DARK HALF, NEEDFUL THINGS, and SK's unfinished film script for THE NIGHTFLIER. It was an honor to be their guardian. SK kindly signed the title page of everything for the auction.

The date for the auction is almost confirmed, probably late May when SK's next book comes out.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Today is publication day for one of the most throughly researched, authentic thrillers that I've read in a long while: KJ Howe's SKYJACK. As a pilot, I was particularly impressed by the accuracy of the airplane details, which are prominent in this novel with an airplane-in-peril on its cover.

I've watched KJ's adventurous progress as a novelist for several years. Her main character is Thea Paris, an expert in the world of kidnap/ransom negotiations/retrieval. KJ was educated around-the-world and knows the international scene. In addition, KJ has interviewed many kidnap/ransom specialists and knows her way around that world also.

What's especially intriguing about SKYJACK is that Thea Paris is a role model in a way that few thriller authors would attempt. This powerful character whose world is filled with action has diabetes.

Highly recommended.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Here's a link to a print conversation between me and KJ Howe, the author of SKYJACK, a thriller that I highly recommend for its authentic details and its terrific main character, who's an expert in the kidnap/ransom world. The topic of our discussion is the problem of writing a second novel. Many debut authors never write a second one. If you'd like to learn some reasons why they don't, here's a link to the print conversation in which I talk about FIRST BLOOD and TESTAMENT while KJ talks about THE FREEDOM BROKER and SKYJACK.

http://thrillbegins.com/2018/04/09/second/
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded