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Rachel Konrad
Works at Renault-Nissan Alliance
Attended Northwestern University
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Rachel Konrad

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Most of you know that I favor fuel-efficient cars over rockets... but I give big thumbs up to the Nissan GTR, which just outpaced pretty much every other supercar on the planet in the Top Gear power board. http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/07/84060-nissan-gt-r-beats-pants-off-most-supercars/
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Rachel Konrad

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I just bought our last lead-acid car battery. And I salute Gary Newman for this brilliant horn rock rendition of his best song. DieHard Vs Gary Numan Commercial [Are Cars Electric?]
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No battery required. Gary Numan could have started those cars with his stare alone.
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Devastating Greenpeace spoof of VW's Darth Vader ads. Ouch.
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that is amazing
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Told ya.
In the race to sell electric vehicles to the American public, Nissan so far appears to be outpacing Chevrolet. For the first six months of 2011, Nissan sold 3875 Leaf electric cars, while Chevrolet so...
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Rachel Konrad

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Test drive the Nissan LEAF as well as the Renault Fluence ZE (with swappable batteries) at TED in Edinburgh this week!
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Those going to TEDGlobal in Edinburgh this week get an extra treat: Test drives of the Nissan LEAF (with Quick Charge) and the Renault Fluence ZE (with battery swap). And while you should admire the technology, visitors should remember to drive on the "wrong" side of the road. :)
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Cheers to Renault for reviewing ad policy in News International publications. The French carmaker spent a half a million dollars in 12 months on such ads -- but has no current ads in the papers engulfed in this week's scandal.
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Hi, everyone. I've joined Google+ and will be posting commentary on the intersection of work and life.
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Been too long! I miss the world according to Rachel
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Have her in circles
130 people
Jim Walker's profile photo
scott beseler's profile photo
Roosevelt Gist's profile photo
Rob Hallstrom's profile photo
Aniko Hoover's profile photo
Raul Smith's profile photo
AJ Mitchell's profile photo
Sam Abuelsamid's profile photo
kris blastz's profile photo
Work
Employment
  • Renault-Nissan Alliance
    Director of Communications, 2011 - present
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Story
Tagline
Promoting a sustainable world, one electric mile at a time. :)
Education
  • Northwestern University
    history + journalism, 1989 - 1993
  • Grosse Pointe South High School
    high school, 1984 - 1989
  • Johns Hopkins University
    School for Advanced International Studies, 2002 - 2002
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Excellent views and impeccable service are the highlights of this classic Midwest restaurant. The bottled wine selection is also good (though by the glass is fairly limited), and happy hours are quite lively. The menu is conventional (burgers, steaks, seafood, salads) and has some real stand-outs (lobster bisque is perfection). However, the overall effect is risk-averse, predictable and not so appealing after the first visit: You won't find a lot of Thai chile speasoning, pesto glazes, watermelon gazpacho or other contemporary touches for foodies, and there doesn't seem to be a big difference in the menu from season to season. I wish the chef would take a few more risks and offer some items that are a bit beyond the typical local comfort zone of well-done salmon or steak; you can accomplish this without alienating anyone, and get beyond buttery sole meuniere. Surprisingly for such a conventional restaurant, the Caesar salad was not properly pre-dressed, and it came coated haphazardly in a dressing that was too creamy, not garlicky enough, and heavily blasted with powdered Parmesan (big demerits here -- should have been shaved!). The sushi is OK but not on the same level as the former Southfield haunt Musashi. The restaurant is best known for its large dessert cart, which indeed has some delicious offerings but is not uniformly excellent: The carrot cake is tooth-rattle sweet, and the signature coconut cake is bland. However, key lime pie is delicious, and the molten chocolate cake is dreamy. Overall, a classy place if you have an unambitious palate and are mostly interested in service, view and the see-and-be-seen business vibe -- but foodies will find little to surprise and delight them.
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Public - a week ago
reviewed a week ago
A solid, dependable restaurant for business meals or any special occasion, the Rattlesnake Club's menu has become increasingly daring and of interest to foodies -- while still not alienating "old school" eaters who just want seafood or beef. The menu could best be described as "classic Midwest with international flare." The gazpacho in the summer is one of the best in the city. The cob salad includes the usual suspects (romaine lettuce, bacon, tomatoes) -- as well as huge chunks of Maryland crab, plus any other type of add-on (salmon, chicken, shrimp, etc.) Giant shrimp were laced with coconut and Thai spices for a lovely shrimp cocktail. The bar drinks are phenomenal (try the watermelon mojito). The desserts are also innovative: The "study in s'mores" is basically a deconstructed version of the campfire classic, with a graham cracker leaf, marshmallow ice cream and a chocolate brownie. Big points for going just outside the box enough to be interesting, while catering to the Midwest base of seafood-and-steak lovers. And of course the view (overlooking a gentrifying part of the Detroit River) is only rivaled by restaurants in the Renaissance Center. Service was a special treat, with a waiter who was hilarious but not obsequious. You really can't go wrong here.
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Public - a week ago
reviewed a week ago
Entertaining and conveniently located, but the quality of the equipment was inconsistent. (For instance, the trigger seemed to stop working three minutes early for one person in our party.) Also, there seems to be only ONE person working at the entire place. He's extremely nice and as helpful as possible, but the result is that no one is there to greet you at the ticket counter while the sole employee is giving the how-to-play lesson. (And be warned, no one ever seems to answer the phone.)
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Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
This restaurant is on the well trodden tourist trail but is a highlight of any foodie's trip to Paris. This is one of the world's first restaurants and was the haunt of some of France's best known characters, from Napoleon to Voltaire. Even if you don't eat there, it's worth a stop to see Napoleon's hat and the warren of little rooms throughout the 17th century building. For such a lovely setting, the prices are surprisingly moderate. Five stars for overall value, five stars for location and ambience, five stars for historical value, three stars for service and three stars for the food, which was conventional but tastefully done, with a good selection of the "French classics" (coq-au-vin, etc.). Better than average plates include: endive and Roquefort salad; grilled trout; and pintade in creamy sauce on a bed of savoy cabbage.
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Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
14 reviews
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This restaurant is more like a beloved Parisian bistro than a conventional American restaurant -- and I mean that in the best possible way. This menu is spectacular, with an emphasis on bright flavors, seasonal ingredients and thoughtful presentation. Unlike a lot of the buzz-worthy restaurants in Detroit (Joe Muer's, London Chop House, Roast, etc.), the food here is conventional enough to be familiar and comfortable -- but nearly everything has a unique twist for foodies. Soup of the day was chilled cucumber-yogurt gazpacho with a hint of Thai chile, and the main course of the day was a perfectly cooked, bright pink Columbia River salmon over a bed of couscous, grilled zucchini, tomatoes and eggplant. Innovative touches make even the most ordinary bar food stand out: The perch sandwich includes spicy sauerkraut on panini, an unusual combination that really works. The desserts (especially the chocolate sorbet and the apricot-chevre tarte) were the best I've had in the Midwest. Portions are "right sized" -- not gargantuan monstrosities laden with cheap carbs, so you can have three courses and not feel completely disgusted with yourself. A new deck out back is fine for sunny summer days that aren't too humid. I sincerely hope this restaurant survives and thrives as the neighborhood (which is still "transitional" at best) recovers from decades of blight. 'm so happy that this restaurant exists and highly recommend it for all occasions.
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Public - a week ago
reviewed a week ago
Lovely setting in the heart of the Latin quarter -- one of the very rare restaurants in this now-kitschy neighborhood that's full of locals and retirees, not tourists. Extremely good value for money with a 29 euro lunch ménu that offers your choice of seven options for entrée, seven for the main course, and numerous dessert options, as well as an amuse bouche, kir royale and a half-pitcher of house wine per person. Food is conventional, classic, no-risk "French comfort food," and service is punctual and friendly. Fish dishes are particularly good but you can't really go wrong with any choice here.
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Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Excellent value for the money, with classic French "comfort food" and innovative touches here and there (salade avec des samosas d'Epoisses). Fairly large portion sizes and excellent service in this quaint village restaurant in the medieval "ville haute" of a sleepy but charming Aisne town. Easy parking and only steps away from the ruined facade of a doomed chateaux rich in history. This is the perfect spot to fuel up before hiking or biking the Canal d'Ourcq trail. Highly recommend as a fun day trip from Paris.
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Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago