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Sandy Sisti
Works at Wild at Heart Images, Wildlife and Nature Photography
Lives in Wapiti, WY
2,699 followers|1,831,486 views
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Sandy Sisti

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"Morning Majesty"

This handsome fellow made a very brief appearance in Yellowstone, before he disappeared into the trees as the sun began to rise.
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After the bison calf incident in Yellowstone, I thought I'd share this image of a bison calf with you. These little guys couldn't be any more adorable, and I'd be lying if I didn't admit that sometimes it's really hard for me to think clearly around all that cuteness. But no matter how cute they are or how concerned we are for their well being, it's important that we let them be. ‪#‎keepwildlifewild‬
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Well said, +Sandy Sisti. Some individuals have forgotten or do not respect why Yellowstone and other places like it was formed to begin with. Please keep personal safety first.
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"Wide Eyed"

With Yellowstone being so busy, I've been trying to photograph outside the park when I can. While walking around Wapiti last week, I heard some squawking, and found this great horned owlet and his sibling calling for their mother from an old pine tree. Mom was nearby, keeping an eye on her brood, but since it was the middle of the day, she was more interested in resting than feeding the youngsters.

Since I located the family, I've been trying to photograph them as much as I can, but I hadn't seen them since Wednesday. This afternoon, a friend called me and told me that one of the owlets had fallen from the tree and wound up near the roadway. A bird rehabilitation center in Cody was contacted and determined the owlet was injured. Yesterday they took the owlet to their rehab facility where they will care for him (or her) until he can be released into the wild.

I was so sorry to hear that the little owl was injured, but I'm glad there is a facility in Cody that can care for him until he is well again. As for the rest of the family, I'm not sure where they've gone, but I hope wherever they are that they are safe.
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Great shot Sandy!!!
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Happy Mother's Day to all the amazing moms out there...including mine!
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Liz C
 
Oh how beautiful. Our new national mammal!
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Baby, I'm a Star.....

I've been spending so much time focused on the foals at McCullough Peaks lately, that I nearly forgot about my favorite stallion, Washakie.....well, not really. Funny thing is, it almost seemed as though this handsome stud missed having his picture taken, since he put on quite a show this morning. He certainly knows how to make me forget about all the other horses on the range...even the babies. What can I say, he really is a star!
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Great shot Sandy, and sorry to hear about scar face.
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It breaks my heart to report that legendary Yellowstone Grizzly 211, known to all of us as Scarface, was shot and killed just outside of Yellowstone in November of last year. After living in the wild for 25 years, he deserved to die the death of a wild bear, not staring down the barrel of a gun. Rest in peace, my old friend. You will be missed.  Below is the original press release.

OFFICIALS IDENTIFY GRIZZLY KILLED IN NOVEMBER INCIDENT
(Bozeman, Mont.)—Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks has confirmed that the male grizzly bear shot in late November 2015 was the bear known to researchers as No. 211. No. 211 was killed in the Little Trail Creek drainage north of Gardiner, Montana on the Gallatin National Forest, an event under investigation by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
No. 211 was recognizable because of distinctive scars on the right side of his face likely the result of typical fights with other male grizzlies for females during mating season or to claim deer and elk carcasses. No. 211 was known to many photographers and wildlife watchers. For this reason, his life was often documented in the media.
In his prime, No. 211 weighed approximately 600 pounds. At his last capture in 2015, he had lost nearly half of his body weight, weighing in at only 338 pounds. His body condition was probably linked to his advanced age of 25 years. Less than 5 percent of male bears born in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem survive to 25 years.
The grizzly bear is protected by both the federal government and the State of Montana as a threatened species. The Service routinely investigates incidents affecting threatened and endangered species and is conducting an investigation with the assistance of Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks.
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Yep, noble animal like that deserved a wild death, not by a bullet shot by a piece of human technology.
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Sandy Sisti

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Prayers for the Littlest Angel.....

In the wild world, nature can be cruel and unforgiving. Sometimes you witness scenes that break your heart so much that you must look away. While at other times, you see sights so beautiful that they will stay with you forever.

The last few days with this newborn wild filly have been both heartbreaking and uplifting. Less than 48 hours into her young life, the injured filly was abandoned by her mother and their band. I can’t explain why this happened, just as I can’t explain why the band stallion, Bridger, would not accept the newborn into his family. His constant badgering of the filly and her mother, Ms. Packman, injured the young one and finally caused her mother to reject her. I don’t want to paint Bridger as a villain, he is a band stallion just acting as nature requires. Perhaps Bridger sensed the filly was unfit or maybe he did not want another stallion’s foal in his band. There is no way of knowing what caused his behavior, but once Bridger rid the band of the filly, he quieted down and the family dynamic returned to normal. As I watched them yesterday there was no sign of the aggressive stallion I had witnessed over the last few days. Bridger grazed quietly with Ms. Packman by his side, both seemingly oblivious to the newborn only a few hundred feet away.

Like you, I thought the story of this little filly would end at this moment, but sometimes even in the darkest of times, there is light. I’ve never been one to believe in miracles, but what happened after this little one was abandoned is as close to a miracle as I’ve ever seen. Once she was rejected by her family, the injured filly was surrounded by the stallion, Washakie and his three mares, Adobe Girl, Cheyenne and Sanita. If I were to predict what would happen next, I would think Washakie’s band might attack the filly, quickly ending her young life. But these horses did something I would never expect, they adopted the little filly, with Washakie’s young mare, Sanita acting as her mother and showing the little one as much love as Ms. Packman did during her first 24 hours.

As I watched Washakie and his band protectively huddle above the filly as she slept, I had hope that maybe this story would have a happy ending. Washakie even nuzzled the frightened newborn as his own when two bachelor stallions bickered nearby. It even appeared that the filly was nursing from Sanita, who pushed the baby to her teats when she stood. But when the filly tried to walk, I saw her crippling injuries and was reminded that most times these stories of survival don’t end as we wish they would. I won’t stop hoping that there will be a different ending to this story, but even if there isn’t, it comforts me to know that this special little filly will feel tenderness and compassion during her last hours on this earth and will die feeling loved…. and I know that’s all any of us can ask for.

Image: Ms. Packman and her filly, just 3 hours after her birth on May 20, 2016.
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Please keep us posted on the little filly, +Sandy Sisti and good luck out there!
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Please Respect our Wildlife...
Yellowstone's summer season has just begun, but already complete disregard of the safety and well-being of the park's wildlife is rampant. So far, we have two instances of people petting bison (that we know of) and one near unbelievable situation of a family putting a bison calf in their vehicle because they thought it was cold and dying. The people involved in these incidents weren't injured, but that's not always the case. Just last week in Custer State Park, a woman had to be life-flighted out of the park when she was gored after approaching a bison too closely.

It's accidents like these that reinforce the importance of staying the required 100 yards from wolves and bears and 25 yards from all other wildlife. I photograph bison all the time, but most of my photos are taken from the safety of my car with a telephoto lens. I've seen bison gore and kill each other, so I certainly don't want to get too close.

I really can't stress enough how important it is to never approach bison. These 2,000 pound behemoths can move at speeds of up to 30 mph and are extremely unpredictable, with bulls being incredibly dangerous and ill-tempered at all times. Because of this, it's so important to respect bison and give them their space, which means no selfies, no posing with them and no petting. And that goes for all the wildlife in Yellowstone...for your safety and theirs, please respect them!
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In answer to your question, with bison, either a horn or a hoof.
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I'm incredibly honored to share with you that National Geographic licensed my red fox father and kit photo to use as the cover of their new book, "Amazing Dads". This photo was taken in 2010 when a fox family denned under an old building at Pahaska Tepee, just outside of Yellowstone's East Entrance. The fact that Nat Geo will be using this image for their "Amazing Dads" book is very special to me, as I lost my amazing dad 16 years ago. My dad always encouraged me to do what I love and I hope that somehow he knows that I took his advice. Thanks for all you did for me, Dad. I miss you. This is for you.......
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Well, I don't speak for others who follow your journey into Yellowstone but what I can do is express how honored I am to have journeyed with you (and hubby!) these past 3 years. It comes as no surprise that you're receiving high ranking attention; I feel you put a lot of love into your art. Congratulations, +Sandy Sisti! You've earned this!
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Oh Happy Day.....

Just when you're starting to feel a bit sorry for yourself after taking care of your sick cat for the last two weeks, you finally catch a glimpse of one of the fox kits whose mother has decided your neighborhood is a good place to den. Pity party over! And in case anyone might be wondering, my cat, Damien, is feeling a lot better today. It seems that things are finally looking up!
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So adorable! Wonderful capture +Sandy Sisti​
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I wanted to share with you the first time I saw the grizzly, Scarface. It was in the summer of 2011, in one of his favorite wildflower meadows on the slopes of Mount Washburn. At that time, I had heard stories of Scarface, the formidable grizzly who strode through the park without fear, but had only seen him in photos until that day in early July.

Hoping to photograph the incredible wildflower display that morning, I saw a few cars pulled off to the side of the road with camera lenses pointed in the direction of a thick patch of bluebells. With my curiosity piqued, I pulled my car off the road and pointed my binoculars towards the bluebells where I could see a distinct hump peaking out from above the flowers. Always excited to see any grizzly, I got my camera ready, just in case the bear looked in my direction.

When the bruin finally raised his massive head, I caught sight of his worn research collar, scarred face and torn right ear. I knew then I was seeing the legendary Scarface. Shaking with excitement, I photographed the big boar as he foraged in the wildflower meadow. As was his way at that time, Scarface didn’t stick around long. Once the sun peaked over the horizon, he disappeared into the trees.

Seeing this mighty bear for the first time was an unforgettable experience for me. After our first meeting, I saw Scarface in the same meadow of wildflowers every year since 2011 and I know, out of habit, I will look for him still. Although he has left this world, I'm certain his spirit will reside forever in Yellowstone in his perfect field of flowers. Rest well, old friend. You will be missed.
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Beautiful image!
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"The New Kid in Town"

There's another new face at McCullough Peaks....a tiny colt for the mare, Weeleetka. My friend, Amy, told me about this little fellow last weekend, so I imagine he's about 7-10 days old. He's still very small and alternated his day between sleeping and eating, but he looks really healthy as does his mom. I'm not sure who the father is, but the little family was with an older, brown tobiano stallion. Could it be the stallion, Moon Pie? That would be a guess on my part, but it looks like him to me.
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Great shot Sandy.
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Work
Occupation
Wildlife and Nature Photographer
Employment
  • Wild at Heart Images, Wildlife and Nature Photography
    Wildlife and Nature Photographer, 2008 - present
  • SQA Services
    Certified Process Consultant-Quality Assurance Technical Reviewer, 2012 - 2013
  • Cody Laboratories, Inc.
    Quality Assurance Director, 2007 - 2011
  • GlaxoSmithKline
    Quality Assurance Manager, 2005 - 2007
  • Corixa Corporation
    Quality Assurance Manager, 2000 - 2007
  • Johnson & Johnson
    Sr. Quality Specialist, 1989 - 2000
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Story
Tagline
Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you. – Frank Lloyd Wright
Introduction
I'm a wildlife and nature photographer living just outside the east entrance of Yellowstone National Park. Like a lot of people I meet, after my first visit to Yellowstone, I was hooked. I relocated from Long Island, New York, to be close to the Park and now, here I am. 
Bragging rights
Yellowstone National Park is my backyard.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Wapiti, WY
Previously
New Hope, PA - Victor, MT - East Northport, NY - Hamilton, MT - Cody, WY - Clinton, NJ