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SterlingMedicalAdvice.com
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Your Personal and Immediate 24/7 Healthcare Consultant
Your Personal and Immediate 24/7 Healthcare Consultant

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Straight, No Chaser (Unless the Chaser is Mouthwash): Halitosis

Let’s talk about bad breath (halitosis).  Putting the silliness of someone’s breath odor (or in some cases, oh dear) aside for a second, the overwhelming majority causes of bad breath are relatively simple things and have easy fixes (specifically flossing and brushing, including the tongue), but it could be a sign of a significant medical issue.  I would hope the next time you stumble across someone with bad breath, you’d care enough to speak up.  You could identify a life threatening disease, such as liver failure or diabetes!  For example…

Simple medical issues: have a sore throat or bad teeth (pharyngitis, laryngitis, a dental infection/abscess)?  How about reflux?  You’ll have halitosis.

You don’t brush and floss?  You don’t clean those dentures as much as you should?  You’ll get gingivitis, gum decay and an abscess = halitosis (bad breath). 

How’s your diet?  You like onions, garlic, curry, cauliflower or coffee?  You smoke or chew tobacco?  You drink way too much?  You probably have halitosis.  Yes, you!

The most important thing is to get to the root of the cause.  Take the example of the dental abscess.  This infection is found at the bottom of a tooth usually with someone already having gingivitis (inflammation of your gums) and cavities (and yep, is probably a cigarette smoker).  It can be treated with penicillin or other antibiotics, but continuing to smoke without getting the cavity closed will continue to cause repeat infections.

At the root of the funk are certain types of mouth-based bacteria not needing oxygen to thrive.  These bugs produce odors as part of their metabolizing the ‘goodies’ they’re chewing on in your mouth, and much in the way a cow produces methane gas when it farts…  That’s why brushing and flossing are so important.  It’s a constant battle to beat back these organisms that live in your mouth.

Sooo… enjoy your day, and remember to take a Tic Tac and a smile.

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) will offer beginning November 1. Until then, enjoy some of our favorite posts and frequently asked questions as well as a daily note explaining the benefits of SMA membership. Please share our page with your Friends on WordPress, Facebook at SterlingMedicalAdvice.com, and on Twitter @asksterlingmd.
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Straight, No Chaser: Stroke Recognition

Let’s talk about strokes, aka Cerebral Vascular Accidents (CVA) and Transient Ischemic Attacks (TIA), and specifically about recognition and treatment. If you don’t remember anything else here, commit the mneumonic FAST to memory. (Details follow.)

A stroke (CVA) is an insult to some part of your brain, usually due to an inability of the blood supply to deliver needed oxygen and nutrients to that part of the brain. The brain actually approximates a “body map,” so depending on what part of your brain is affected, different parts of your body will be predictably affected. Technically, a stroke isn’t a stroke until the symptoms have been there for more than 24 hours; until then and/or if the symptoms reverse within that timeframe, the same scenario is called a TIA or a “mini-stroke.”

Think FAST, Act Faster

Here’s how the layperson can recognize a possible stroke:

•Face: Ask the affected person to show you his/her teeth (or gums). In a stroke the face often droops or is otherwise noticeably different.

•Arms: Ask the person to lift and extend the arms so the elbows are at eye level. In a stroke one side will often be weak and drift downward.

•Speech: Ask the person to say any sentence to you. In a stroke the speech will slur or otherwise be abnormal.

•Time: If any of the above occur, it’s recommended that you call 911 immediately, but if it’s my family, I’m getting in a car and going to the nearest MAJOR medical center—not the nearest hospital, which is where the ambulance will take you. There are important differences in hospitals when it comes to stroke treatment (which you won’t know offhand), because some are designated stroke centers and others are not.

Friends, this is not the situation where you should wait hours or overnight to see if things get better. Time is (brain) tissue. It is VERY important that you act on any of the above symptoms (F-A-S) within three (3) hours of symptom onset. Important treatment options are available within the first four and a half (4 ½) hours that are otherwise unavailable.

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) will offer beginning November 1. Until then, enjoy some of our favorite posts and frequently asked questions as well as a daily note explaining the benefits of SMA membership. Please share our page with your Friends on WordPress, Facebook at SterlingMedicalAdvice.com, and on Twitter @asksterlingmd.
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What should I do if I’m having a hard time coping with recent changes in my life?

Adjusting to change or coping with a recent traumatic event is a difficult process and can lead to some of the same symptoms as mental illness if left unaddressed. Short-term treatment is often very effective to help prevent long-term distress, especially when you seek help sooner than later. Difficulty coping with change is normal, and talking with a professional to help make a healthy transition does not indicate you have a mental illness.

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) will offer beginning November 1. Until then, enjoy some of our favorite posts and frequently asked questions as well as a daily note explaining the benefits of SMA membership. Please share our page with your Friends on WordPress, Facebook at SterlingMedicalAdvice.com, and Twitter @asksterlingmd.
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Fighting a Cold? Drink, Drink, Drink! Dehydration can easily occur (especially if you are running a fever or vomiting). If you're unable to keep fluids down, contact your physician.

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Going in to the flu season, here are some tips from our experts:
1) Wash your hands, a lot!
2) Avoid touching your face
3) Clean household surfaces
4) Smile! It will boost your immune system
5) Don’t re-use tissues

#health #questions #medical #advice #doctor #help #emergency #ER #doctorsoffice #onlinedoctor #onlinemedical #medicaladvice
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