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Garry Hayes
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Garry Hayes

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It's hard to hide a 14,000 foot mountain in California, but someone managed to do it...
And then put a mountain right next to it that is actually white. Seriously. So, quick, what's the name of the third highest mountain in California? And for a bonus point, what is the name of the second highest? No, quicker th...
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Well I've been lying to everyone for years then. Yes I climbed it. A bit too technical for no ropes or safety. Loose rocks. Very steep. But the south side is a very tall and sheer cliff over a purple lake. There are vertical sheets of granite a hundred feet wide or more that are peeling off from the surface of the cliff and are about two or three feet thick. We found a place where one was peeled off about two feet and it's perfectly flat top was like a bar top. We sat on the top of the slab between it and the actual cliff face and ate lunch looking a hundred miles across the southern Sierra ridge. Spectacular. Oh, we watched as group after group of PCT hikers passed by on the ridge above the lake just to the east of Goddard. 
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Garry Hayes

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Exploring an isolated, but spectacular corner of Zion National Park
...unless you've been following my latest blog entries, anyway. The beautiful exposures of the crossbedding in the Navajo Sandstone (above) provides another clue; we are in Zion National Park, but in a section that is ignored...
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I don't do advertisements on my site except for NAGT and a friends mineral supply, so it shouldn't have happened.
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Checking out a tourist destination in Zion Canyon that I've visited many times, but never really seen: the Emerald Pools
There is a somewhat odd relationship between me and Zion National Park. I love the place, I've been there probably 20 times in the last two decades, but I haven't seen a whole lot of the park. The problem is that I'm usually ...
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Did you rush through Bryce Canyon when you visited? Or worse, did you think one hoodoo is as good as another and skip it entirely? It is an incredible place to explore in depth.
One of the mysteries of the origin of the Grand Canyon involves the fact that early rivers flowed in the opposite direction of the Colorado River that exists today. Some of those early rivers ended in lakes that covered hundr...
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I'll never forget camping in Bryce Canyon for a week about 15 years ago, driving all along the escarpment, walking down into the hoodoos... I went in early May and it was gorgeous weather. I'd 'forgotten' how high up we were and got a bad sunburn on top of my head from the sun!!  Got up early for dawn light, stayed up for sunset light, and everything in between. A wonderful adventure.
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The folly of saying we control a river. Glen Canyon dam on the Colorado River.
The Colorado River is a wonder of nature. Starting from glacial cirques high in the Rocky Mountains, the river flows through one canyon after another, culminating in the grandest canyon of them all, the Grand. For 1,450 miles...
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Garry Hayes

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The "Fingers" of Zion, another quiet corner of a crowded national park.
My last few posts have been about finding some quiet corners in one of our busier national parks, the one at Zion Canyon. Sometimes one finds solitude by following popular trails at less popular hours, or by following where t...
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Want a wilderness experience in Zion? Go where the trams go. Not where they stop, but where they go. Today Geotripper explores the upper canyon.
Not where they stop, mind you, but where the trams go. Zion National Park underwent a huge change in 1997 when the park service closed the upper canyon of Zion to private vehicles and instituted a system of free tramways. The...
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Pretty incredible fly-through of the second largest underground cavern room so far discovered.
Maybe you've noticed, but I'm not commonly known to promote commercial enterprises here at Geotripper. Spam comments get immediately squashed, and book reviews and commercial links are very rare. But sometimes, something very...
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Wow!  Nothing more to say - WOW!
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A second set of strange standing stones not at all like the first...Kodachrome Basin State Park in southern Utah
There was a time not all that long ago when there was a part of the United States mainland that was still considered terra incognito. It was in 1948 that National Geographic explored this region and called it not a tour, but ...
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A landscape quite unlike any other on the Colorado Plateau, along the Cockscomb in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.
There are a lot of strange landscapes on the Colorado Plateau and otherworldly scenes. Some are famous enough as to not surprise first time visitors, such as the spires and hoodoos at Bryce Canyon National Park. But others ar...
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A visual journey through the incredible Antelope Canyon in Arizona
Glen Canyon was a beautiful, magical place that was unceremoniously flooded under the waters of Lake Powell (and I'm pretty sure John Wesley Powell would have been appalled that his name was given to the lake). Despite the gi...
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Geology professor
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Geotripper, and geoprofessor in Central California
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