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Linda Crampton
805 followers -
Biology, nature, and health writer
Biology, nature, and health writer

805 followers
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Mary Anning was a nineteenth century fossil collector who made some important discoveries in paleontology, although she wasn't always given credit for them. She has been called "the greatest fossilist the world ever knew". There is renewed interest in her work today.

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This is a very worrying and sad report about the animals that are disappearing from the Earth, often due to human activity. The animal shown in the photo lives in Madagascar and is known as a blue-eyed black lemur. Only around a hundred of the animals still exist in the wild.
The vanishing animals that future generations will never see

Some of the world’s most exotic animals could be extinct within months, conservationists have warned, with future generations growing up in a world without many of the species that are alive today.

The WWF claims that some animals, such as the vaquita porpoise, could be wiped out in the next few months.

Some would now be extinct had zoos not provided a ‘Noahs Ark’ from which to reestablish populations.

Habitat loss, poaching, hunting and disease are pushing many species to the brink to such an extent that the world has now entered a sixth mass extinction.

More than 23,000 species are on the IUCN Red List threatened with extinction, including 41 per cent of the world’s amphibians, 25 per cent of mammals and 13 per cent of birds.

Numbers of vaquita - dubbed the panda of the sea - have dropped by 90 per cent since 2011 because the porpoise are getting tangled in illegal fishing nets.

There are only 30 now left in the wild, and all live in Mexico’s Gulf of California. Conservationists have warned they could be extinct by the autumn if the Mexican government does not do more to protect the area..... http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/05/20/vanishing-animals-future-generations-will-never-see/
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Research suggests that at least some plants may be able to detect sound vibrations, including those created by water moving through a pipe, the chewing sounds created by insects as they feed, and the buzzing of bees at a particular frequency. Exactly how plants detect sound vibrations—if they do—is a fascinating topic to contemplate and investigate.

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The strange case of Phineas Gage still fascinates scientists and students today. In 1848, a tamping iron accidentally pushed through Gage's left cheek and then travelled behind his eye socket, into his brain, and out the top of his head. The accident didn't kill him, but the brain damage changed his personality dramatically. As one researcher has said, it's inspiring to know that the personality change disappeared after two to three years, suggesting that rehabilitation is possible even in some cases of severe brain damage.

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I love the wide variety of rhododendrons that I see at this time of year.
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This is my favourite rhododendron colour. The plants grow very well where I live. I enjoy photographing them.
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Mary Anning made important contributions to science. I'd love to explore the part of Britain where she found so many Jurassic fossils.
Birthday girl Mary Anning has many nicknames, including the “princess of paleontology,” the “mother of paleontology,” and—our favorite—“the greatest fossil hunter the world has ever known.”
http://on.natgeo.com/2pYqVlG
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Chili peppers contain capsaicin, which is responsible for their heat. The more capsaicin that is present, the hotter the pepper and the stronger its effects when eaten. At the right concentration, the chemical has health benefits. The creation of a new and extremely hot pepper may be very significant with respect to health.

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This vault in the Arctic contains almost a million seed packets. It was designed to save food crops for humanity in case there was a disaster on Earth. Melting permafrost in the Arctic recently sent water into the entrance tunnel of the vault. The water didn't reach the seeds and eventually froze. The ice has been removed, but the ability of the vault to protect the seeds is now a concern.

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Scientists have reprogrammed skin cells from mice so that the cells "hunt" and attack brain cancer. If this works in humans, it could be a wonderful new method of shrinking or destroying brain tumours. The researchers are especially hopeful that the technique could be used in glioblastoma, which is an aggressive form of brain cancer that is very hard to treat surgically. 
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