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Marcelo Fiscella
Lives in Rosario, Argentina
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Marcelo Fiscella

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新年快乐
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Marcelo Fiscella

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In this searing talk, Glenn Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide.”
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"Software engineers should write because it promotes many of the same skills required in programming. A core skill in both disciplines is an ability to think clearly . The best software engineers are great writers because their prose is as logical and elegant as their code.

Code and essays have a lot more in common. Both begin as a blank slate and an idea, then end as a discrete product for an intended audience. The product is a sequence of logical statements, bundled into modular units– whether it be functions or paragraphs. Like good prose, good code is concise (think 'expressive'). Bad code wastes CPU cycles; bad essays waste brain cycles. The writer’s draft is the engineer’s prototype."
Software engineers should write. In elementary school, there were “math kids” and there were “English kids”. You were classified by the other kids' impression of your prowess in each subject. I was a math kid. So I majored in computer science and set off to be a software engineer.
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Great topic!, I fully agree on this part "Even if nobody reads your essay, writing it will make an impact on you.". 
There are things in common between writing for humans and for computers, also a lot of differences; here some :  the shared bio and destiny of the writer/reader (perhaps all differences derive from that), the sound of words, the mandatory interpretation, etc...
the shared bio:  oh computer how can I explain you about smells and that some of them reminds me of places and people, and old times, not to mention explain love (like a malfunction that feels right?, a bug that solve a problem? forget it.. you'll never know).
When we open a IDE, and type for(;;); //to write a forever loop, the computer read it, is ok, it causes no anguish, not to me, no to the computer, but reading in a story "her time stop, she now sleep forever with no dreams", is very different, why? because we all will die, the writer and the reader, and both know or knew that, so questions are how to live, and how life ends? a forever sleep? is a magic dream?, for computers it doesn't mind any of this, it should, because computers will die too.. so, using two digit to represent a year.. y2k, was programming  with a "computer immortality bias" ? mm no, I bet it that was sheer irresponsibility.. 
Sound: Sometimes writing for humans makes you think/feel/guess about how words resound in head,  not only in reference to other words/meanings, but in sound!, rhythm! is important (like in music), in computers we don't mind how a sentence may "sound" while (matcher.find()) {  is ok, on the other hand there is a visual impact (the contrast of text and spaces, indentation, coloring , etc..) that is more important in programming than in writing, because in human texts the reader is already magnetized by the not-so-higher level story and sounds, so text align and colors is not so important, two or three words are enough for us to feel, but the computer programming need specificity, and the story/end result is perhaps too far away of the text (the lower the level of the language by definition is the farther the end result) so we need those visual effects to follow some local meaning while building.
finally mandatory interpretation I use to say it, half in joke, half seriously, that a difference between human language and computer language is that computer is not obliged to parse anything, in fact it doesn't, "syntax error, period." but human is compelled to do it!, we require to parse anything, with no option. For humans, as it is said :
what has been seen, cannot be unseen.

(off topic by the way, Happy new year!!)
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Happy Software Freedom Day! #SFD  

With the rise of cloud computing (1), users are losing control of most of their relevant computations, and their computing devices are basically becoming glorified thin clients. 

The Free Software movement has clearly won most of its battles (2). But  we are now entering into a new era, in which the battle for Free Services is the one we will have to fight and win (3). 

Software Freedom is being able to control your computation

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(1) In this context I'm talking mostly about "SaaS". IaaS and PaaS are extremely important too, but they are pretty well covered by FS.
(2) FS did not win the "battle for the desktop". But in a time when "the browser is the OS" and "JavaScript is the new Assembly", that battle has become totally pointless.
(3) If you're truly interested in this subject, I encourage you to watch "The Dark Ages of Free Software" by Stefano Zacchiroli (see Debian_in_the_Dark_Ages_of_Free_Software)
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Marcelo Fiscella

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His vocabulistics is limited to "I" and "am" and "Groot".  Exclusively in that order. (Rocket Raccoon)

What a challenge for a programming language...!
groot - The Groot Programming Language
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Complexity vs Complications (by Alan Kay)
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With a few honorable exceptions, every single keyboard or typing device that came after this one is just a bad joke.
The first thing you notice about the IBM Model M keyboard, when you finally get your hands on it, is its size. After years of tapping chiclet keys and glass screens on two- and three-pound devices,...
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Muchas veces me he preguntado cómo habrá sido estar el 9 de Diciembre de 1968 en el Centro de Convenciones de San Francisco, momento en el que Douglas Engelbart hizo historia presentando en sociedad numerosas piezas que resultaron fundamentales para la tecnología de las siguientes 3 décadas.

Probablemente nunca lo sabré. Pero la noticia de la publicación del primer prototipo funcional e interactivo del proyecto Xanadu es uno de esos momentos singulares en los que uno puede tener la magnífica chance de presenciar la historia grande en el momento mismo en el que se está escribiendo.

Este es probablemente uno de esos grandes hitos capaces de iniciar revoluciones de grandes proporciones. Y acaso dentro de algunas décadas, algunos se preguntarán cómo habrá sido "estar allí" en el momento en el que finalmente vio la luz la obra cumbre del notable Ted Nelson. 
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You see a central xanadoc ("Origins", by Moe Juste) which is built of excerpts from other documents (sourcedocs). Each excerpt is visibly connected to its source. You may cross a colored bridge to its original context. (The parts Moe Juste wrote are excerpted from. HIS sourcedoc, in blue.) ...
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