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Luis Gonzalez
37 followers -
I'm a serious writer, tackling serious subjects, but doing so in a humorous and serious way.
I'm a serious writer, tackling serious subjects, but doing so in a humorous and serious way.

37 followers
About
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Some things are just in one's blood.
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I wouldn't be a real Cuban without one of these.
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Thank you to the editors of Urban Dictionary for making it official. "Terracism" is now part of the Urban English Landscape. Please visit link:    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=terracism … 
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Luis Gonzalez commented on a post on Blogger.
So very proud and honored to receive this award for my book. A humungous and heart-felt thank you to All Authors!

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So very, very proud to be named a recipient of the All Authors Certificate of Excellence Award for my work on Luz.

Please share in this great news.

http://allauthorsce.com/…/meet-the-newest-aace-recipient-l…/
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Monday morning you sure look fine. . . . first you love me . . . and then you fade away . . .
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I thought I'd add something new to this page: excerpts from LUZ, kind of an "on-line book reading" especially for those of you curious about the story or my writing. Please let me know what you think and feel free to share.

From book i: Chapter 3, Visitations

My father always seemed wrapped up in his work, and even when I was little, I viewed him as emotionally detached and distant. I was forever devising ways to lure him from his detachment. One day, when I was ten, I thought I found the perfect way: by showing a genuine interest in that which captivated him so.

“What is it about that culture that fascinates you?” I asked.

“The marketplaces,” he replied wistfully. “Whenever I see pictures of marketplaces in the Middle East, or of the surrounding architecture of the squares, or of the men sipping coffee and smoking cigarettes while discussing politics and history in that sea of sound and smell and color, I long to be there. I ache to be there.”

I didn’t get it. To me it seemed like an incongruous pairing: Cuban and Arabic, especially since, as far as anyone knew, nobody in the family carried a drop of Middle Eastern blood in their veins. Thank goodness too. Even from a young age I felt no affinity with that culture, especially their treatment of women and how the men from that region of the world required females to cover up from head to toe just to appease their primitive insecurities. My father’s side of the family hailed from a long line of teachers, so it made perfect sense that he always stressed education and higher learning. He went on to earn a doctorate from the Institute of Advanced Linguistic Studies in Havana, and the state certified him with a rating of native speaker in Arabic, Hebrew, Farsi, and Armenian. Only in Aramaic had he received a rank of mediocre, and this forever proved a thorn in his side.
My father taught classes, not only at the language institute where he earned his doctorate, but all over Cuba. He was that renowned

One day officials from the Ministry of the Exterior approached him about a thrilling new project for which he had been recommended and personally selected. Representatives came to him with a proposal shortly after the start of the Gulf War in ’91, and if he accepted, it meant my father would be traveling to the Middle East posthaste. It didn’t take him long to make up his mind. Nor did it pain him any to arrive at the decision on his own.

“I’m going to Iraq,” he announced matter-of-factly, only three days before he was scheduled to go. “I leave on Friday.”
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Just gettin' the creative juices flowing again--that's all! Have a lot of last minute work to do before book iii: scatterings comes out in December.
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Listen--I'm not cutting out that part of the chapter no matter what anyone says. Think what you want, but it stays! 
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August 14, 1994 . . . Night was swiftly approaching, but darkness would soon be a specter of the past. . . LUZ, chapter one . . . August 14, 2015 . . . Tomorrow morning a light would carry me forward. Tomorrow morning I would start to live and no longer feel dead inside.
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