Profile

Cover photo
Hubble Space Telescope
1,154 followers|89,681 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Hubble Space Telescope

Shared publicly  - 
 
A Giant Hubble Mosaic of the Crab Nebula

This is a mosaic image, one of the largest ever taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope of the Crab Nebula, a six-light-year-wide expanding remnant of a star's supernova explosion. Japanese and Chinese astronomers recorded this violent event nearly 1,000 years ago in 1054, as did, almost certainly, Native Americans.The orange filaments are the tattered remains of the star and consist mostly of hydrogen. The rapidly spinning neutron star embedded in the center of the nebula is the dynamo powering the nebula's eerie interior bluish glow. The blue light comes from electrons whirling at nearly the speed of light around magnetic field lines from the neutron star. The neutron star, like a lighthouse, ejects twin beams of radiation that appear to pulse 30 times a second due to the neutron star's rotation. A neutron star is the crushed ultra-dense core of the exploded star.

The Crab Nebula derived its name from its appearance in a drawing made by Irish astronomer Lord Rosse in 1844, using a 36-inch telescope. When viewed by Hubble, as well as by large ground-based telescopes such as the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, the Crab Nebula takes on a more detailed appearance that yields clues into the spectacular demise of a star, 6,500 light-years away.

The newly composed image was assembled from 24 individual Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures taken in October 1999, January 2000, and December 2000. The colors in the image indicate the different elements that were expelled during the explosion. Blue in the filaments in the outer part of the nebula represents neutral oxygen, green is singly-ionized sulfur, and red indicates doubly-ionized oxygen.

More Science on Earth's Blog: → EarthSpaceCircle.blogspot.com

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Hester and A. Loll
Explanation from: http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2005/37/image/a/
63
97
Martin Hedert's profile photoVeronica Flores's profile photoLARRY BLAZE B's profile photoalesa lott's profile photo
8 comments
 
Magnificent
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
1,154 people
Moon's profile photo
Hector Perez's profile photo
Dennis McCunney's profile photo
International Space Station's profile photo
Nathan Watts's profile photo
GROŹNE ZJAWISKA POGODOWE W POLSCE (GZPWP)'s profile photo
Tommy Yim's profile photo
Ashley Piper's profile photo
rajesh sharma's profile photo

Hubble Space Telescope

Shared publicly  - 
14
2
Tylek Carr's profile photoshushan Kruse's profile photoLARRY BLAZE B's profile photo
 
cool
Add a comment...

Hubble Space Telescope has a new profile photo.

Shared publicly  - 
21
4
marek kolbuk-lukasiewicz's profile photoСергей Бородинов's profile photoTársis Valim Olivetti's profile photo‫اسكـنـــدر . لـ .‬‎'s profile photo
2 comments
 
Technology: the amazing thing that allows us to look at a 43ft long, 24,490lb peice of advanced technology that allows us a glimpse into deep space, and hovers about 1,832,160ft (347 miles) above the Earth. The sad thing is that this was taken from the Atlantis upon returning to Earth after the last mission to Hubble. Time marches on.
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
1,154 people
Moon's profile photo
Hector Perez's profile photo
Dennis McCunney's profile photo
International Space Station's profile photo
Nathan Watts's profile photo
GROŹNE ZJAWISKA POGODOWE W POLSCE (GZPWP)'s profile photo
Tommy Yim's profile photo
Ashley Piper's profile photo
rajesh sharma's profile photo
Story
Tagline
Please share this page - Thank You!
Introduction

he Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a space telescope that was carried into orbit by a Space Shuttle in 1990 and remains in operation. A 2.4-meter (7.9 ft) aperture telescope in low Earth orbit, Hubble's four main instruments observe in the near ultravioletvisible, and near infrared. The telescope is named after the astronomer Edwin Hubble.

Hubble's orbit outside the distortion of Earth's atmosphere allows it to take extremely sharp images with almost no background light. Hubble's Ultra-Deep Field image, for instance, is the most detailed visible-light image ever made of the universe's most distant objects. Many Hubble observations have led to breakthroughs in astrophysics, such as accurately determining the rate of expansion of the universe.

Although not the first space telescope, Hubble is one of the largest and most versatile, and is well known as both a vital research tool and a public relations boon for astronomy. The HST was built by the United States space agencyNASA, with contributions from the European Space Agency, and is operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute. The HST is one of NASA's Great Observatories, along with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope.[6]

Space telescopes were proposed as early as 1923. Hubble was funded in the 1970s, with a proposed launch in 1983, but the project was beset by technical delays, budget problems, and the Challenger disaster. When finally launched in 1990, scientists found that the main mirror had been ground incorrectly, compromising the telescope's capabilities. The telescope was restored to its intended quality by a servicing mission in 1993.

Hubble is the only telescope designed to be serviced in space by astronauts. Between 1993 and 2002, four missions repaired, upgraded, and replaced systems on the telescope; a fifth mission was canceled on safety grounds following the Columbia disaster. However, after spirited public discussion, NASA administrator Mike Griffin approved one final servicing mission, completed in 2009. The telescope is now expected to function until at least 2014. Its scientific successor, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), is to be launched in 2018 or possibly later.