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Adreana Langston
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Solid Gold SEO | Ideas Through Execution
Solid Gold SEO | Ideas Through Execution

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From Bloomberg Newsweek March 27, 2017 issue - by line by Stephanie Baker, Michael Smith and David Kocieniewski - 10 min audio read.

While Cambridge Analytica has faced scrutiny before over whether its data models actually work, a closer look at the past practices of its London-based affiliate, SCL Group Ltd., reveals a corporate DNA less predisposed to dazzling technologies to sway voters than to using old-fashioned tricks and political subterfuge.

READS FOR YOU
Reads For You is a weekly video playlist in which the most interesting, engaging articles from newspapers and magazines are produced as audio reads. Hot long read articles being discussed in the media and interesting reads from magazines that may be new to you. Stay informed through your ears even when you don't have time to read every article with your eyes . Join the Reads For You email list to receive alerts on new audio read playlists AND a weekly curated list of podcasts you may have missed by need to hear each week: http://eepurl.com/cK1dZb #CambridgeAnalytica #AlexanderNix #BigDataAnalysis 

Why I Will NEVER, EVER Purchase A Nexus Device
My letter to Google (in feedback) re SEE INSIDE tours

Dear +Google Maps
I am unhappy that the SEE INSIDE tour is no longer in the SERP knowledge box when web surfers search for a business.

I am unhappy that the SEE INSIDE tour is no longer at the top of the left hand info column when web surfers click on a business in Google Maps.

I am unhappy that the SEE INSIDE tour is not AUTOMATICALLY the first image in the carousel when Google Maps is in carousel view.

Your company promoted the HELL out of SEE INSIDE tours. While Google specifically did not get the money, this was not a free service. My employer has over 70 stores. My employer spent thousands and thousands of dollars paying photographers to produce SEE INSIDE tours for our retail outlets because the tour featured so prominently on Google. Now Google, without warning, has totally downgraded the prominence of the tour after my company made a SUBSTANTIAL INVESTMENT.

This is the kind of thing that discourages businesses and individuals from adopting Google goods and services. I am so glad I never purchased a Nest thermostat for my home because Google abandoned it. I totally regret encouraging my employer to put resources into Google Catalogs because Google abandoned it. I am so glad I never purchased the Google router for my home because Google abandoned it. And THAT is the reason I will never buy a Nexus phone nor will I ever purchase the Google device that competes with Amazon Echo.

And it is with GREAT reluctance that I will suggest to my employer that resources be put into any new services Google offers (like Meet and/or Chat) that require a monetary investment.

When you suggest/encourage/ask people to SPEND MONEY on a good or service or SEO technique that you then abandon, it does NOT engender trust. It really degrades your credibility.

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What about the house cleaner and the gardener?

The Google Streetview vans do their work in the light of day. Well doctors, lawyers, stock brokers and other high paid professionals are at work in the light of day most days and they get to work by driving their expensive vehicles.

You know whose vehicle are parked in the driveway or in front of the houses of High Household Income neighborhoods during the day? The maid's car. The nanny's car, the gardener's truck and so on.

I really don't see how these MIT researches could assume that the cars on the street during the day are cars belonging to people who live in the neighborhood as oppose to people who work in the neighborhood when the neighborhood is residential.

_But how does the population of vehicles in an area relate to the local demographics? To find out, the team trained another deep-learning algorithm to learn the correlation between vehicle types and the data from U.S. Census and presidential election voting patterns in each precinct (an area of about 1,000 people). This training data set consisted of the data from 35 cities.

They then used the rest of the data to test the deep-learning algorithm. The question they wanted to answer was: given the pattern of vehicles in an area, could the algorithm accurately predict the demographics as recorded in the U.S. Census and presidential voting data?

It turns out that the deep-learning algorithm can do this remarkably well. “Using the classified motor vehicles in each neighborhood, we infer a wide range of demographic statistics, socioeconomic attributes, and political preferences of its residents,” they say.

For example, sedans are most closely associated with Democrats, while extended cab pickups are more closely associated with precincts that voted Republican. “We found that by driving through a city for 15 minutes while counting sedans and pickup trucks, it is possible to reliably determine whether the city voted Democratic or Republican,” say Gebru and co._



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Robots and Artificial Intelligence Are Upending The Art Of The Sale
Six minute audio article from +The Washington Post.

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Not having diversity in tech actually has CRIMINAL implications for high melanin people

Bias programming in - bias results out

Does it surprise you AT ALL that the algorithm programmed mostly by White Men returns the majority if its false positives on women, children and high melanin people? So basically everyone BUT White Adult Men. This should not even be CALLED a Facial Recognition Database. It should be called "An algorithm programmed to accurately recognize White adult male faces.

Women - algo gets confused by cosmetics
Children - algo gets confused by the smoothness of their features and how their faces change over relatively short periods of time because they are growing.
High Melanin People - Their skin tones make it harder for algo to distinguish their features.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you've ever wondered how much the government knows about you, here's one more thing to consider - about half of all American adult faces are now searchable in police databases, and some law enforcement agencies can identify people on video surveillance in real-time. This is according to the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law School. Alvaro Bedoya co-authored this new report, and he joins us now in our studios in Washington. Thanks for coming in.

ALVARO BEDOYA: Thanks for having me.

MARTIN: So explain how this works. What does it take for an ordinary citizen to end up in one of these databases?

BEDOYA: All it takes is to have a driver's license photo taken. This is a profound shift in the way we police society. So unless you've committed a crime, in general, you're not going to be in a criminal fingerprint database. You're not going to be in a criminal DNA database. Yet by simply standing for a driver's license photo, 26 states enroll you in basically a virtual lineup just like in the movies, except it's not a human being pointing to the suspect. It's an algorithm.

MARTIN: So this is going to come as a surprise to many people who didn't know this. Just by getting a driver's license...

BEDOYA: Right.

MARTIN: ...In 26 states...

BEDOYA: That's right.

MARTIN: ...You're saying that that image is then put into a police database that they then cross-reference when a crime happens.

BEDOYA: So some of them are put into a police database. Others remain in the DMV database, but the police can either directly run searches or request them. There are no audits. There's little transparency. And so simply by being a citizen who drives, you are subject to thousands of warrantless searches. And there's no laws that control any of this

Listen to: Police Facial Recognition Databases Log About Half Of Americans - http://one.npr.org/i/499042369:499042370
#FacialRecognition #BiasProgramming #GovernmentSurveillance #Prism #NSA #OverPolicing #Privacy #DMVDatabase

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Does it surprise you AT ALL that the algorithm programmed mostly by White Men returns the majority if its false positives on women, children and high melanin people? So basically everyone BUT White Adult Men. This should not even be CALLED a Facial Recognition Database. It should be called "An algorithm programmed to accurately recognize White adult male faces.

Women - algo gets confused by cosmetics
Children - algo gets confused by the smoothness of their features and how their faces change over relatively short periods of time because they are growing.
High Melanin People - Their skin tones make it harder for algo to distinguish their features.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you've ever wondered how much the government knows about you, here's one more thing to consider - about half of all American adult faces are now searchable in police databases, and some law enforcement agencies can identify people on video surveillance in real-time. This is according to the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law School. Alvaro Bedoya co-authored this new report, and he joins us now in our studios in Washington. Thanks for coming in.

ALVARO BEDOYA: Thanks for having me.

MARTIN: So explain how this works. What does it take for an ordinary citizen to end up in one of these databases?

BEDOYA: All it takes is to have a driver's license photo taken. This is a profound shift in the way we police society. So unless you've committed a crime, in general, you're not going to be in a criminal fingerprint database. You're not going to be in a criminal DNA database. Yet by simply standing for a driver's license photo, 26 states enroll you in basically a virtual lineup just like in the movies, except it's not a human being pointing to the suspect. It's an algorithm.

MARTIN: So this is going to come as a surprise to many people who didn't know this. Just by getting a driver's license...

BEDOYA: Right.

MARTIN: ...In 26 states...

BEDOYA: That's right.

MARTIN: ...You're saying that that image is then put into a police database that they then cross-reference when a crime happens.

BEDOYA: So some of them are put into a police database. Others remain in the DMV database, but the police can either directly run searches or request them. There are no audits. There's little transparency. And so simply by being a citizen who drives, you are subject to thousands of warrantless searches. And there's no laws that control any of this

Listen to: Police Facial Recognition Databases Log About Half Of Americans - http://one.npr.org/i/499042369:499042370
#FacialRecognition #BiasProgramming #GovernmentSurveillance #Prism #NSA #OverPolicing #Privacy #DMVDatabase

Bias programming in - bias results out

Does it surprise you AT ALL that the algorithm programmed mostly by White Men returns the majority if its false positives on women, children and high melanin people? So basically everyone BUT White Adult Men. This should not even be CALLED a Facial Recognition Database. It should be called "An algorithm programmed to accurately recognize White adult male faces.

Women - algo gets confused by cosmetics
Children - algo gets confused by the smoothness of their features and how their faces change over relatively short periods of time because they are growing.
High Melanin People - Their skin tones make it harder for algo to distinguish their features.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you've ever wondered how much the government knows about you, here's one more thing to consider - about half of all American adult faces are now searchable in police databases, and some law enforcement agencies can identify people on video surveillance in real-time. This is according to the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law School. Alvaro Bedoya co-authored this new report, and he joins us now in our studios in Washington. Thanks for coming in.

ALVARO BEDOYA: Thanks for having me.

MARTIN: So explain how this works. What does it take for an ordinary citizen to end up in one of these databases?

BEDOYA: All it takes is to have a driver's license photo taken. This is a profound shift in the way we police society. So unless you've committed a crime, in general, you're not going to be in a criminal fingerprint database. You're not going to be in a criminal DNA database. Yet by simply standing for a driver's license photo, 26 states enroll you in basically a virtual lineup just like in the movies, except it's not a human being pointing to the suspect. It's an algorithm.

MARTIN: So this is going to come as a surprise to many people who didn't know this. Just by getting a driver's license...

BEDOYA: Right.

MARTIN: ...In 26 states...

BEDOYA: That's right.

MARTIN: ...You're saying that that image is then put into a police database that they then cross-reference when a crime happens.

BEDOYA: So some of them are put into a police database. Others remain in the DMV database, but the police can either directly run searches or request them. There are no audits. There's little transparency. And so simply by being a citizen who drives, you are subject to thousands of warrantless searches. And there's no laws that control any of this

Listen to: Police Facial Recognition Databases Log About Half Of Americans - http://one.npr.org/i/499042369:499042370
#FacialRecognition #BiasProgramming #GovernmentSurveillance #Prism #NSA #OverPolicing #Privacy #DMVDatabase

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So now someone could get a commercial real estate license and work for Amazon.com scoping out new convenience store locations

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Online Privacy Tips From Consumer Reports
63 Easy Steps For Protecting Your Online Privacy
From the October 2016 issue of Consumer Reports
This is a straight up screen grab of the digital edition of the ​ Consumer Reports magazine. So reading on your phone might not be so easy though a tablet or desktop read should be fine.

If you are an #AmazonPrime member you can read this article for free. Amazon Prime now offers Kindle readable magazines as part of the Prime services available to members. Consumer Reports is one of the available titles.

#OnlinePrivacy #OnlineSecurity #Prism #Hacking #IdentityTheft #CyberSecurity  
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2016-10-10
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