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The Vanishing Cultures Project
53 followers -
Devoted to assisting indigenous groups preserve their culture.
Devoted to assisting indigenous groups preserve their culture.

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After spending months in the Amazon with the Xikrin people, we're proud to announce the publication of VCP's newest book, THE XIKRIN: INDIGENOUS LIFE IN A CHANGING AMAZON. Today, the Xikrin are still fighting the construction of the Belo Monte Dam. This book captures the Xikrin's traditional lifestyle that hangs in the balance.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Xikrin-Indigenous-Changing-Amazon/dp/0991489608/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1400055760&sr=8-1&keywords=xikrin+indigenous

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Nguy, an indigenous Moken man living on Ko Surin island, rows his small sampan out into the shallow waters in front of his village. Moken, often called sea nomads, have lived in the Mergui Archipelago of Thailand and Myanmar for hundreds of years, but are being increasingly forced to settle because of development and overfishing.
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Xikrin men and women gather in a house in the Amazon rainforest to have their bodies painted. The Xikrin are fighting against construction of the Belo Monte - the world's third largest dam - being built a few miles away on the mighty Xingu River.
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Looking for a beautiful and unique holiday gift that supports a good cause? Take a look at our prints from Mustang and Mongolia. http://www.vcproject.org/books-prints/upper-mustang-prints
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Great article about the Awá, described as the most endangered tribe on earth. Feat. images by Sebastiao Salgado: http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2013/12/awa-indians-endangered-amazon-tribe
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A Xikrin father in the Amazonian village of Poti-Kro cares for his young son.
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Every two weeks, Xikrin women in the Amazon gather to repaint their bodies.
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A Xikrin woman climbs a genipap tree in the Amazonian village of Poti-Kro. Genipap fruit is mixed with charcoal and used to paint the bodies of Xikrin men, women, and children.
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Many scientists say construction of the Belo Monte Dam will dry up the Bacaja River, threatening the Xikrin people.
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