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The Vanishing Cultures Project
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After spending months in the Amazon with the Xikrin people, we're proud to announce the publication of VCP's newest book, THE XIKRIN: INDIGENOUS LIFE IN A CHANGING AMAZON. Today, the Xikrin are still fighting the construction of the Belo Monte Dam. This book captures the Xikrin's traditional lifestyle that hangs in the balance.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Xikrin-Indigenous-Changing-Amazon/dp/0991489608/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1400055760&sr=8-1&keywords=xikrin+indigenous
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Xikrin men and women gather in a house in the Amazon rainforest to have their bodies painted. The Xikrin are fighting against construction of the Belo Monte - the world's third largest dam - being built a few miles away on the mighty Xingu River.
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Lost Tribes, Lost Knowledge - A 1991 cover article in Time Magazine. Still incredibly relevant. http://ow.ly/ryvYK
by Eugene Linden. This article appeared in Time, September 23, 1991, pp.46-54. One horrible day 1600 years ago, the wisdom of many centuries went up in flames. The great library in Alexandria burned down, a catastrophe at the time and a symbol for all ages of the vulnerability of human knowledge ...
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Great article about the Awá, described as the most endangered tribe on earth. Feat. images by Sebastiao Salgado: http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2013/12/awa-indians-endangered-amazon-tribe
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A Xikrin woman climbs a genipap tree in the Amazonian village of Poti-Kro. Genipap fruit is mixed with charcoal and used to paint the bodies of Xikrin men, women, and children.
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Many Xikrin women smoke pipes to keep the Amazonian mosquitos at bay.
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Have them in circles
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Nguy, an indigenous Moken man living on Ko Surin island, rows his small sampan out into the shallow waters in front of his village. Moken, often called sea nomads, have lived in the Mergui Archipelago of Thailand and Myanmar for hundreds of years, but are being increasingly forced to settle because of development and overfishing.
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Looking for a beautiful and unique holiday gift that supports a good cause? Take a look at our prints from Mustang and Mongolia. http://www.vcproject.org/books-prints/upper-mustang-prints
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A Xikrin father in the Amazonian village of Poti-Kro cares for his young son.
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Every two weeks, Xikrin women in the Amazon gather to repaint their bodies.
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Many scientists say construction of the Belo Monte Dam will dry up the Bacaja River, threatening the Xikrin people.
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A rainbow breaks through the clouds as Xikrin warriors return from a successful hunting trip.
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Have them in circles
54 people
Adam Hanuljak's profile photo
Karma Thinlay Thome's profile photo
WILSON HEARD's profile photo
Benjamin La Framboise's profile photo
Sukumar Periwal's profile photo
Piyush Pandey's profile photo
Noel McLellan's profile photo
Adir .C's profile photo
Bethany Meuleners's profile photo
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Devoted to assisting indigenous groups preserve their culture.
Introduction
The Vanishing Cultures Project is a nonprofit organization devoted to assisting indigenous, traditional groups worldwide preserve their culture by documenting their lifestyle through photography and research, funding local preservation initiatives, and educating the public about these groups. The books and photos we produce aim to amplify the voices of indigenous peoples, spread awareness on global diversity, and promote geographic literacy by providing a public archive of cultural information. The funds raised through book and print sales, donations, and grants are given to local cultural preservation initiatives to empower indigenous people in preserving aspects of their own culture.